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Food: of the Devil Krone

Putting a pre-Christmas scare into an Austria town

  Putting a pre-Christmas scare into an Austria town Townsmen dressed head-to-hoof in shaggy black sheepskin costumes and scaring children -- welcome to Austria's annual Saint Nicholas play awarded UNESCO heritage status. "We are very proud to have preserved our tradition," said Martin Rainer, 56, who heads the group that organises the play, which won its UNESCO intangible cultural heritage status in 2020. Your browser does not support this video "We are certain we'll be able to continue it in the next century because of younger people's interest," he added.

Volbeat-Rocker: Poulsen © Tom Wesse Volbeat-Rocker: Poulsen

Once used to vehemently differentiate themselves from the parents. A trend that started in the United States in the late forties and early fifties, which started his triumphal march around the world. What started with Elvis Presley continued. Evolutionary genre progressions of Rockabilly and Rock ’n’ roll to beat, psychedelic and progressive rock to hard ’n’ hiyy, glamrock and punk repeatedly challenged the establishment again-even put under social upheavals.

Nowadays there is a completely different status quo: Rock culture as such has long been an integral part of the mainstream, no trace of revolution. What is evident at events in great arbor. At the StippviSite of the Danish formation Volbeat, entire family associations can be found in the sold -out Frankfurt Festhalle: mom and dad, around the offspring, sometimes even grandma, grandpa, uncle and aunts. Herr Papa meticulously banned the family outing of his by video and photo on his smartphone. Then the little ones get showed how the right pose works: to take the tongue out, look really angry, watch your eyes very much, both thumbs up, and also the frame fork, better known as the devil's greeting or Mano Cornuta of the hard metal absence.

Lucifer, Satan or as the fallen angel from the Old Testament calls himself, in the repertoire of the Volbeat, lifted out of baptism in 2001 by vocalist, guitarist and composer Michael Poulsen in Copenhagen “, A hard-metallic mega riff that Black Sabbath or Deep Purple would not have managed better in their heyday, the crowd of visitor charges at an optimal party break is literally kicking into the delirium. The devil's issue is not surprising, which flares again in the last third by "The Devil Rages On". Before Michael Poulsen formed Volbeat, he acted in the Latin-Satanian Death Metal team Dominus. The early Volbeat with roots in rockabilly and rock ’n’ roll proved to be a rather radical departure.

In the 21st year of existence, this with drummer Jon Larsen, Sologitarist Rob Caggiano and Bassist Kaspar Boye Larsen, demonstrated a very wide range of spectrum, as if it wanted to combine all significant styles in solidarity: Rockabilly and Rock 'N' Roll joins in a hand -picking In -house compositions added the already mentioned palette from beat to punk, from hard rock to heavy metal. Straightlessly serves on a gigantic high-tech stage with a non-stop flood of images of background impressions and an all-round catwalk that can be walked all around for the musicians. In its interior, there is even an audience-this exclusivity can be enjoyed against a ticket purchase. Poulsen, Caggiano and Larsen make plenty of use from the catwalk in the multifaceted style discourse. On the short excursion on the acoustic guitar, cover versions shine: "I only want to be with you" by Dusty Springfield and "Ring of Fire" by Johnny Cash. The confetti machine shoots considerable quantities twice. All in all with the Support Acts Bad Wolves and Skindred a very varied four-hour plus marathon in the overwhelmed phon thunderstorm.

Putting a pre-Christmas scare into an Austria town .
Townsmen dressed head-to-hoof in shaggy black sheepskin costumes and scaring children -- welcome to Austria's annual Saint Nicholas play awarded UNESCO heritage status. "We are very proud to have preserved our tradition," said Martin Rainer, 56, who heads the group that organises the play, which won its UNESCO intangible cultural heritage status in 2020. Your browser does not support this video "We are certain we'll be able to continue it in the next century because of younger people's interest," he added.

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