TOP News

Health: How the Gender Health Gap affect women today

Katherine's 35 year battle for answers

  Katherine's 35 year battle for answers Katherine struggled for 35 years before she was diagnosed with autism , so why are thousands of women falling through the cracks? It all has to do with stereotypes.They imagine little boys with fixations on computers or trains, who grow into socially awkward and oftentimes brilliant men.

When Chinese Premier Li Keqiang called for a “sense of urgency” about growing economic risks during a meeting with provincial officials earlier this week, it was his third such warning in days.

“We need to be highly vigilant for unexpected changes in the international and domestic situations, and downward economic pressure has further mounted,” China’s No 2 official told a symposium in Jiangxi province on Monday, according to a report in South China Morning Post, less than a week after drawing attention to the “complicated and evolving” global situation and COVID-19 outbreaks at home.

As China’s draconian “dynamic zero-COVID” pandemic restrictions and uncertainties including the war in Ukraine weigh on growth, Beijing appears increasingly concerned about the prospects for the world’s second-largest economy.

Proactive Fertility Tests: I Confronted My Fears and Went Through the Process for You

  Proactive Fertility Tests: I Confronted My Fears and Went Through the Process for You From my late teens all the way through to my mid-to-late twenties, I considered myself a ‘relationship girl’ (cringe, I know). I was someone who didn’t much enjoy casual dating, and often found myself cosied up in long-term relationships. In my naive mind, I assumed there would be a neat, linear process to my romantic story, leading to me getting hitched and popping out a child by 30. Thoughts about fertility planning, non-traditional families (whatever that even means), and solo living never even popped up on my radar. Because, at that point, I’d never seen any of those other roads taken by anyone close to me.

The uncertain outlook casts doubt on the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s ability to reach its target of 5.5 percent economic growth in 2022, even as state media insist the ambitious goal remains within reach, adding to mounting risks for the global economy that include war in Europe, soaring energy prices and upcoming interest rate increases in the United States.

And it raises questions about how far policymakers may go – regardless of adverse economic consequences – to meet Beijing’s lofty ambitions.

Shanghai’s ultra-strict lockdown is weighing on the economy and global supply chains [File: Aly Song/Reuters] © Provided by Al Jazeera Shanghai’s ultra-strict lockdown is weighing on the economy and global supply chains [File: Aly Song/Reuters]

If COVID-19 cannot be quickly brought under control – which seems increasingly unlikely – then either Beijing’s zero-tolerance pandemic strategy or the growth target will have to go, said Carsten Holz, an expert on the Chinese economy and professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST).

Jetson One: First flying car on the market

 Jetson One: First flying car on the market It is more and more distinguishes that the relief of road traffic should not only be made on the rail, but also in the air. Through flying cars! © Imago / Cover-Images Jetson One The first pictures were almost hypnotic: In an official video of the Swedish manufacturer Jetson, a man climbs the Jetson One , a Quadcopter, which actually for the period of 20 minutes with electric power float through the air.

“In the face of lockdowns, the old channel from state-directed credit to state-directed investment or production becomes inoperative,” Holz told Al Jazeera. “A relatively lockdown-free rural sector cannot save the real GDP growth rate: Agriculture’s share of GDP is only eight percent.

“Industry, the largest sector in GDP, cannot, either, as long as there are lockdowns, nor can the travel and hospitality industries,” Holz said.

Among China’s top 100 cities by GDP, all but 13 are under some level of pandemic restrictions, with the intensity of those controls on the rise, according to a recent analysis by global investment research firm Gavekal.

In Shanghai, a strict lockdown has forced manufacturers such as Tesla and fellow carmaker Nio to suspend production and delay shipments at the city’s port, the largest of its kind worldwide, while sparking rare displays of civil unrest among the metropolis’s 26 million residents.

Harry’s subtle new insight into royal exit

  Harry’s subtle new insight into royal exit Prince Harry has shared a subtle new insight into his decision to quit his role as a senior working royal, revealing that he believes quitting a job for the sake of your mental health should be “celebrated”. Prince Harry has shared a subtle new insight into his decision to quit his role as a senior working royal, revealing that he believes quitting a job for the sake of your mental health should be "celebrated". The Duke of Sussex made the revelation when he sat down to discuss his role as Chief Impact Officer for San Francisco-based company BetterUp, a role he began in March.

In March, China’s factories saw activity drop at the quickest pace in two years, while vehicle sales fell nearly 12 percent year on year.

‘Life at the forefront’

Despite the mounting costs, Chinese President Xi Jinping, who is bidding to secure an unprecedented third term at the next party congress in October, has repeatedly ruled out any shift away from dynamic zero-COVID, insisting this week the country should “persist putting people above all, life above all.”

Facing deteriorating economic prospects, Beijing has flagged accelerating the rollout of pro-growth measures such as tax cuts and rebates and sales of special-purpose bonds (SPBs) to fund infrastructure projects.

On Monday, the China Securities Regulatory Commission announced that it would ask long-term investors and major shareholders to buy up shares to help stabilise the country’s sagging stock market, which in March saw foreign outflows of $11.2bn in bonds and $6.3bn in stocks.

Many analysts expect more sweeping measures, including interest rate cuts and looser lending rules, to follow in the near future.

ASX Health Stocks: Alcidion wins Aussie government contract, while Resonance seeks US FDA nod

  ASX Health Stocks: Alcidion wins Aussie government contract, while Resonance seeks US FDA nod The ASX 200 Health Index (XHJ) is down by 0.67% at the time of writing, compared to the broader index Read More The post ASX Health Stocks: Alcidion wins Aussie government contract, while Resonance seeks US FDA nod appeared first on Stockhead.

“Up until now, Chinese leaders have been extremely cautious about stimulus, but if things continue the way they’re going, Beijing may have little choice but to return to the infrastructure stimulus playbook to goose growth,” Joe Mazur, a politics and finance analyst at Trivium China, told Al Jazeera.

Taylor Loeb, a finance and politics analyst also at Trivium China, said economic conditions have reached the point where “support policies are going to have to cast a wider net”.

“That means cuts to banks’ reserve requirement ratios (RRRs), a measure that gives the financial sector more agency in who they lend to,” Loeb told Al Jazeera.

“We’re also seeing a quickened rollout of the SPBs that typically fund local government infrastructure projects. SPB funds, like RRR cuts, run the risk of ending up in unproductive projects – as happened throughout the 2010s – but that may be a risk central policymakers have to take to juice the economy.”

Holz, the HKUST professor, suggested Beijing could possibly entertain drastic measures to reach its goal, such as doubling the salaries of state and Communist Party employees.

“It would create a budget deficit on the order of, roughly, 20 percent, but that would not become fully apparent until after the 20th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party,” he said.

'A living hell': The pregnancy condition leaving women bedridden and unable to function

  'A living hell': The pregnancy condition leaving women bedridden and unable to function Imagine that all the things you enjoy doing have been taken away. And in their place all that is left is crippling nausea, constant vomiting, food and smell aversions, anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation. Now, imagine all of this is happening to you because of what the world tells you is the most wonderful that will ever happen to you – pregnancy. This is what it's really like to experience Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) - a complication of pregnancy in which sufferers experience extreme levels of nausea and vomiting.Sydney mother-of-two Caitlin Kay-Smith suffered from HG with both her pregnancies and tells 9Honey Parenting that it was "the worst" time of her life.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has ruled out moving away from a zero-tolerance approach to the coronavirus [File: Andy Wong/AP] © Provided by Al Jazeera Chinese President Xi Jinping has ruled out moving away from a zero-tolerance approach to the coronavirus [File: Andy Wong/AP]

Even so, many economists are sceptical that anything in Beijing’s toolkit will be sufficient to avert a significant slowdown in growth.

On Friday, Morgan Stanley slashed its growth forecast for the Chinese economy this year to 4.6 percent, down from 5.1 percent.

“The policy stimulus will not be that effective as long as mobility is restricted on a broad scale,” Tommy Wu, lead economist at Oxford Economics in Hong Kong, told Al Jazeera.

“The government will have to reduce their emphasis on their growth target and be realistic about how the domestic headwinds and a challenging external environment will affect China’s economy through this year.”

If China’s opaque leadership can’t stomach adjusting its economic goals, particularly in a politically sensitive year, it could seek to change the narrative instead.

“Party Secretary Xi Jinping’s likeliest calculation will be that the easiest solution to the conundrum is to blame COVID-19 for not being able to reach the growth target, keep the death rate low with the help of extensive lockdowns, and secure his tenure as party secretary at the 20th party congress. The PRC’s real growth rate in 2022 could be anything, 0 percent or even negative,” Holz said.

“And should public discontent with lockdowns reach unprecedented dimensions, he could cite new scientific evidence and let the COVID wave roll as long as he can present himself as the rational, well-meaning leader that deserves another term as party secretary and president.”

2022 Flu Vaccine: Why Do We Need a New Shot Every Year? .
Free influenza (flu) vaccines are now available for eligible groups, subject to local supply arrangements, with health authorities encouraging booking in from mid April. For those who aren’t eligible for a free vaccine, flu shots are available now for a small fee (around A$25) from pharmacies and GPs (though you might also have to pay a consultation fee). This year, you can get your flu shot on the same day as your COVID booster. Not ‘just the flu’ Influenza is a disease of the respiratory tract. It can cause a runny nose, coughing, sneezing, sore throat, fever and chills, headache and body aches. It can cause vomiting and diarrhoea, which is more common in children.

See also