TOP News

Health: HRW accuses Ghana of inaction in failing to prevent shackling of people with mental health problems

HRW urges Nepalese government to take action to address dengue outbreak

  HRW urges Nepalese government to take action to address dengue outbreak The NGO Human Right Watch has urged the Government of Nepal on Tuesday to take measures to address the outbreak of dengue fever that the country has been suffering in recent months, due to the expectation that mosquito-borne diseases will become more widespread and severe in the Asian country as a result of the effects […]"As temperatures rise, the federal executive and local governments must work together to protect people from the growing threat posed by disease outbreaks," said HRW South Asia Director Meenaskshi Ganguly.

The NGO Human Right Watch (HRW) on Thursday accused the Government of Ghana of failing to take adequate measures by not preventing the shackling of people with mental health problems in the country.

At a traditional healing center in Ghana, Human Rights Watch found 22 men in a dark, suffocating room, all of them with chains, no more than half a meter long, around their ankles. - 2022 SHANTHA RAU BARRIGA/HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH © Provided by News 360 At a traditional healing center in Ghana, Human Rights Watch found 22 men in a dark, suffocating room, all of them with chains, no more than half a meter long, around their ankles. - 2022 SHANTHA RAU BARRIGA/HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

After visiting five traditional healing camps in the central and eastern region of the African country, the organization has found that in all centers people with mental health problems were chained or confined in small cages, and that in some cases they had been so for more than seven months.

Lockdown was tough on kids, but don’t burden them with ‘mental health disorders’

  Lockdown was tough on kids, but don’t burden them with ‘mental health disorders’ Our children have lived through extraordinary times. The pandemic caused real stress and trauma, but sometimes mental health difficulties are best thought of as normal reactions to abnormal events.We rely on a constellation of symptoms that then constitutes a disorder or illness. Your history is our assessment. But there is a lot of overlap between conditions and making an accurate diagnosis is as much an art as it is a science.

During visits, HRW identified that more than 60 people were chained or caged, including some children.

"Shackling people with psychosocial disabilities in prayer camps and healing centers is a form of torture," said the NGO's disability rights director, Shantha Rau Barriga.

"The newly formed Visiting Committees and Mental Health Tribunal in Ghana must ensure that the chains are broken and that people have access to local services that respect the rights of people with mental health problems," Barriga said, citing a body recently formed by the country's authorities to monitor implementation of the law and investigate complaints of human rights violations.

In the five camps visited by HRW, people were being held against their will, which amounts to indefinite detention. A 40-year-old man detained for more than two months at Mount Horeb Prayer Center said they spend 24 hours a day, seven days a week, locked in a room.

The designer both Kate and Meghan love

  The designer both Kate and Meghan love Whenever Catherine, Princess of Wales steps out in a pastel, fitted-yet-flared number, it's easy to assume the outfit is the work of one of her favourite designers, Emilia Wickstead. While not opting to don Wickstead's pieces quite as often as her sister-in-law, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex has on occasion elegantly sported her designs. Here are some of the duchess' most notable Emilia Wickstead dresses. Whenever Catherine, Princess of Wales steps out in a pastel, fitted-yet-flared number, it's easy to assume the outfit is the work of her favourite New-Zealand born and London-based fashion designer, Emilia Wickstead.

"This Christmas we are not going home. We want to go home and be with our family. Help us. Please help us," asked another man at the same facility.

Ghana's Mental Health Act of 2012 states that people with psychosocial disabilities "shall not be subjected to torture, cruelty, forced labor or any other inhumane treatment," including shackling.

The law also establishes visiting committees and a Mental Health Tribunal to monitor camps and traditional healing centers for compliance with the law.

Upon learning that the practice of shackling continues, Ghana's Deputy Minister of Health, Tina Mensah, conveyed to the NGO her astonishment, "With all this education, they are still shackling?"

"People with mental health problems are human beings just like you and me. They are holders of their rights. A mental health diagnosis is not a death sentence. We should be investing in services in the community," Caroline Amissah, interim executive director of the country's Mental Health Authority, has told HRW.

What is Gaslighting? The True Meaning Behind Merriam-Webster‘s Word of the Year for 2022

  What is Gaslighting? The True Meaning Behind Merriam-Webster‘s Word of the Year for 2022 We have all heard the term ‘gaslighting’ at some point, but the term has a reputation where it loses its meaning somewhere along the way. So, what is gaslighting? Merriam-Webster‘s Word of the Year for 2022, gaslighting has roots in deep psychological learnings, however, much like the word ‘Simp‘, it’s been seamlessly integrated into the […]In this Gaslighting article…

Local non-governmental organizations, especially those led by people with psychosocial disabilities, have been active in pushing for improvements in mental health services and monitoring of existing facilities in Ghana.

The Mental Health Society of Ghana supports the training of Visiting Committees and the Mental Health Tribunal and advocates for greater investments in community mental health. MindFreedom Ghana is establishing community support networks in six of Ghana's 16 regions. Another organization, Basic Needs Ghana, has been facilitating peer support groups.

"Despite the ban on shackling in Ghana, the government has failed to ensure that people with psychosocial disabilities no longer live in such inhumane conditions," Barriga has said.

"The Visiting Committees and the Court have an important role to play in ensuring an end to these long-standing abuses," he has added.

As life speeds up and pandemic drags, burnout is biting hard .
Chronic time-pressure, loss of work-life boundaries and mental exhaustion linked to the pandemic have left more Australians feeling burnt out – especially working parents. Psychologists, workplace experts and researchers say workers in many industries not usually associated with high burnout rates report feeling emotional exhaustion. © Joe Armao Lyanne Morel feels signs of burn out as a parent coming out of COVID.

See also