Australia: SA drops mask mandate for public transport

Queen's death: All public transport in NSW will be free on Sunday for proclamation of King Charles

  Queen's death: All public transport in NSW will be free on Sunday for proclamation of King Charles Premier Dominic Perrottet will use the lure of free train, bus, light rail and ferry travel to encourage the state's residents to witness the proclamation of Australia's new head of state King Charles. The Queen's son and heir will be proclaimed His Majesty the King in a ceremony beginning at 12.30pm on Sunday outside Parliament House in Sydney. © Provided by Daily Mail All public transport will be free across New South Wales on Sunday following the Queen's death.

South Australia will drop COVID-19 mask mandates for public transport after the latest advice from health officials.

South Australia is scrapping its mask rule for public transport in a new easing of restrictions. © Dan Himbrechts/AAP PHOTOS South Australia is scrapping its mask rule for public transport in a new easing of restrictions.

The new provisions will take effect from Tuesday, bringing SA into line with most other jurisdictions.

"This is another step forward in terms of the management of the pandemic," Premier Peter Malinauskas said.

"We are very determined to relax restrictions as soon as it is safe to do so.

"We think this is another practical step going forward."

As of Friday, QR check-ins for disability, health and aged care settings will also be removed along with COVID-19 vaccine mandates for visitors to aged care centres.

Mask mandates for aged care and other health settings, including pharmacies and hospitals, will remain.

The changes come after SA recorded 3631 new virus infections last week, in the first change from daily to weekly reporting.

SA Health also reported 58 more deaths, taking the toll in SA since the start of the pandemic to 860.

She Had to Be Seen to Be Believed .
Queen Elizabeth II had an instinctive grasp of the need to sustain the spell of royal enchantment. Her son Charles III may be less blessed with that gift.A huge and complex contraption of official mourning, rehearsed to exhaustion over the past 15 years, lurched into action. Public events were canceled. The media uncorked a day-and-night flow of solemn eulogy and familiar images. Rain fell, cold and heavy, on Londoners gathering with umbrellas outside Buckingham Palace. Before the announcement, nobody could imagine—wanted to imagine—quite how they would feel. But when it came, they felt only a slow, numbing sadness, and fear.

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