TOP News

Australia: Storms, heavy rains drench parts of regional Queensland, with BOM forecasting more wet weather to come

Victorian wild weather hits music festivals, more extreme wind and rain on the way

  Victorian wild weather hits music festivals, more extreme wind and rain on the way Wild winds and rain are expected to continue in Victoria, after the weather last night forced the mid-performance cancellation of a Melbourne music festival and left dozens of people bogged at another event near Geelong. Punters persisted through the rain on Saturday night at a concert headlined by Crowded House at Mt Duneed Estate, west of Melbourne, in conditions one attendee labelled "awesome but dangerous".Organisers of A Day on the Green at Mt Duneed Estate told attendees before the event began that the show was safe to go ahead, but warned people to wear appropriate footwear and bring a raincoat.

Heavy rain is expected to drench central Queensland this week. (Supplied: Richard Fairley) © Provided by ABC News (AU) Heavy rain is expected to drench central Queensland this week. (Supplied: Richard Fairley)

After months of talk about another La Niña and wet summer for Queenslanders, the rain is officially here.

Heavy rain fell across parts of regional Queensland overnight and the Bureau of Meteorology is urging residents to prepare, with storms and possible hail predicted for the rest of the week.

Over the 24 hours to 9am this morning, 118 millimetres was recorded at Kenbula, south-west of Rockhampton, 81 at Jambin, 79 in the Banana Range, 64 at Boyne Island and 59 was recorded in Rockhampton.

Hot weather conditions prompts fire bans and increased chance of severe storms in parts of Queensland, BOM says

  Hot weather conditions prompts fire bans and increased chance of severe storms in parts of Queensland, BOM says The weather bureau warns hot conditions across Queensland today could cause fires in the south and severe thunderstorms in the north. Brisbane is expected to hit 35 degrees Celsius, while Cairns, Rockhampton and Mt Isa are all predicted to reach 34C today.The Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) senior forecaster Kimba Wong said Queensland's weather was a "tale of two stories", with dry heat in the south and humid heat up north.In south-east Queensland, a dry air mass is starting to spread.

"There's a possibility of some severe thunderstorms which could see some really heavy rain, even the possibility of some windy conditions and some hail along with that too," The Bureau's community information officer Patch Clapp said.

He said current forecasts predicted between 40 to 70 millimetres of rain for Rockhampton tomorrow, and between 50 to 90 millimetres in Gladstone.

"But if you're under the right thunderstorm cells, that could be higher again, up around that 100-millimetre mark," Mr Clapp said.

He added there was a higher chance of severe storms on Wednesday, but the possibility of storms would continue until the weekend.

Rain brings joy for some and fear for others

Ian Groves, a fruit grower west of Yeppoon, said the rain was not welcome.

Why Kanye West’s career may be over

  Why Kanye West’s career may be over Kanye West has long been a lightning rod for controversy, but his most recent comments and actions have clearly gone too far. He’s alienated almost everyone at this point, and is running out of places to speak out (which is probably why he’s buying Parler). Unfortunately, the signs for this happening were always there, and after reading this lengthy list of Ye’s misdeeds, you’ll likely be “So Appalled.”

Mr Groves has been to harvest his lychee and mango crops on his Bungundarra property.

He said he hasn't had much rain overnight, but after receiving more than 350 millimetres in October, he's nervous about more heavy falls over the coming days and weeks

"We really don't want to have 300 millimetres now, that would bring the birds and the bats out to jump all over the nets of the lychee trees and test how good our nets are.

"It also downgrades the quality of mangoes while they're hanging on the trees."

Mr Groves said another summer of La Niña weather would not be not good news for farmers like him.

"The best time for rain in our sort of horticulture is late summer, February [and] March," Mr Groves said.

"That way, we've got a bulk of our summer fruits off, our lychees and mangoes are off and that's sort of more of a traditional time for rain.

"[Our] Dams are currently full from the 300 millimetres we had back in October.

The Victorian Liberals say the state's debt is larger than any other state and larger than NSW, Queensland and Tasmania combined. Is that correct?

  The Victorian Liberals say the state's debt is larger than any other state and larger than NSW, Queensland and Tasmania combined. Is that correct? Victoria's Shadow Treasurer David Davis and the Liberal Party say Victoria's debt is larger than Queensland, NSW and Tasmania combined. RMIT ABC Fact Check runs the numbers. The verdictMr Davis's claim is gilding the lily. So are similar claims from Mr Guy, Mr Bach and the Liberal Party organisation.It's important to note that Victoria's net debt in June 2022 was $99.98 billion.It is not yet the $165.9 billion it is projected to be in June 2026, despite Liberal Party claims it has already "blown out" to similar magnitudes and Mr Davis's claim that it will reach that level by 2025.

"We don't really need a lot of rain. it's nice to keep the grass green but consistent heavy rain it just slows down what you're trying to do.

"I guess we just take what we get and handle the situation as best we can as we always do."

Biloela grazier Wil Barlow' said he had 70 millimetres of rain overnight, which came as a surprise. He said he had spent the morning preparing for the worst in case there was more rain to come.

"This morning [I was] bringing cattle over to this side of the creek so I can keep an eye on them and if worst comes to worst, I can bring them up to higher ground," Mr Barlow said.

"If I hadn't of gotten that rain overnight, I wouldn't have been so worried about the cattle on this side of the creek but because the country is so wet…. if you get torrential rain on it it's going to run down to the creek."

Mr Barlow said he was still excited about the season ahead, and that in his lifetime he had never seen such consistent, welcome rainfall.

"In this rural and agricultural game if the rains are not devastating it's usually money in the bank so that's something to look forward to," he said.

"We just hope that it keeps coming in in moderate falls."

Embracing a wet soggy few days

While some are anxious about the rain, herb grower Richard Fairley embraced a "wet soggy start to the day".

Mr Fairley has a property near Biloela and recorded about 38mm in the past 24 hours.

He said it was nice to enjoy the wet weather now his wheat harvest was done.

"The wheat had a lot of rain on it while we're trying to harvest. We're finished now and we're ready for this lot of rain," Mr Fairley said.

"The last few weeks we headed in and out of paddocks in between lots of rain, but it's all finished now. So it is enjoyable."

Looking ahead, Mr Fairley said he's prepared for a wet summer.

"I think December will be wet and February be wet and it will just be a matter of [the] next planting windows for summers crops."

"As long as the hail stays away, should be able to handle some good rain."

Why landlords will be laughing next year as house prices increase .
SQM Research is expecting property prices to start recovering next year after the Reserve Bank of Australia stops raising interest rates. This would benefit landlords as rents keep soaring.SQM Research is predicting some double-digit home price rises in 2023, with managing director Louis Christopher forecasting an end to Reserve Bank of Australia rate hikes by the middle of the year - and a return to rate cuts.

See also