Tech & Science : Taking aspirin or beta blockers: Why young people also have an increased risk of heart attack at high temperatures

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Bestimmte Medikamente sorgen dafür, dass wir unsere Körpertemperatur nicht mehr so gut regulieren. (Symbolbild) © Getty Images Certain drugs ensure that we no longer regulate our body temperature as well. (Symbol image) Certain medication ensure that we no longer regulate our body temperature as well. (Symbol image)

Certain medication that should actually protect your heart and reduce your blood pressure could cause the exact counterattack at high temperatures. This is shown by a study that was published on August 1, 2022 in the "Nature Cardiovascular Research" . The investigation was carried out by a research team of the Helmholtz Center Munich for Health and Environment, together with scientists from Yale University.

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The team analyzed from 2001 to 2014. They examined almost 2500 heart attack cases , which occurred from May to September in order to look at the warm season. They also compared which medication had taken the patients - including beta blockers who are prescribed at high blood pressure, and so -called thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors (TAH) that prevent the development of blood clots. Aspirin is also one of the tah.

Previous studies had already confirmed that high temperatures could increase the risk of heart attacks. The researchers now wanted to find out whether medication also plays a role.

up to 75 percent higher risk

The result: in humans that take beta blockers or a tah ( for example Aspirin ), the risk of a heart attack on hot days was 63 to 65 percent higher compared to cooler days. Anyone who took both medication even had a 75 percent higher risk of suffering a heart attack. However, the scientists could not find an increased risk of hot days for those who did not consume any of the medication.

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But one should not rashly conclude that the medication is to blame for the increased risk. Because even if there is a connection, it does not necessarily mean that the medication is solely responsible for the increased risk. Rather, the reason why those affected should take the medication can also be responsible for the heart attacks, according to the researchers. After all, poor heart health ensures a higher risk of heart attack even without medication. Nevertheless, the study was able to demonstrate that the study - who generally had a healthier heart - was higher in young people - the risk of a heart attack was higher than in humans over 60 if they took beta blockers or Tha. People under 60 also had a three -time risk of a heart attack in the heat if they took statins. These are medication that lower the cholesterol level.

Medicines make it difficult to regulate body temperature

The researchers suspect that some medication ensures that we can no longer regulate our body temperature so easily. This is a problem, especially at high temperatures, says Kai Chen, co-author of the study and assistant professor at Yale University.

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Other studies show that

Aspirin increases body temperature

. Blood pressure medication is also related to an increased risk of heating stock . "Patients who take these medication have an increased risk," warns Chen in a press release. "You should therefore be particularly careful during the upcoming heat waves." to avoid a heat stroke or a heart attack due to the weather, you should be as little as possible in the sun. Avoid being outside of the hot hours, avoiding physically exhausting activities and drinking enough liquid. With the help of fans, airy clothing, cold showers and water -containing food, you can regulate your body temperature.

This article was translated by Hendrikje Rudnick from English. You can find the original

here.

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