Tech & Science : Antarctic: Researchers discover gigantic living beings

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Astonished scientists have discovered that despite the inhospitable climate of the continent, a millions of square kilometers may be lurking under the icy surface of the Antarctic.

Antarktis © ray hems/iStock Antarctic

researchers have found that could live five million square kilometers in size under the icy surface of the Antarctic .

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The frozen continent is generally considered an

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scientists have long observed flowers of

Photosynthetic algae that appear in the warmer months when the seasonal sea ice of the Antarctic melts.

until recently it was believed that the algae only occur in summer, since the thick layer of ice from Antarctic keeps any sunlight.

New research results of a team of

Brown University in the USA and the New Zealand University of Auckland indicate that a large part of it could live permanently below the surface of the continent, reports Newswey .

Christopher Horvat , who headed the study, said: "The discovery of these flowers in question is the paradigm that there is no life in regions under the sea ice, and raises important new questions about the food networks under the ice cream Antarctic could be. "

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"We believe that they could cover up to 5 million square kilometers of the lower ride region in the southern ocean."

The team, whose research results were published in the specialist magazine Frontiers in Marine Science, made his discovery with the help of data collected by

NASA monitoring satellites , as well as with the help of sea swimmers on site.

The

sea ice of the South Pole Armeer consists of layers of ice with small spots open water in between.

The researchers believe that these water areas also let light through in the winter months so that the

algae can operate photosynthesis all year round.

The ice itself is also thin enough to let a little light through.

, however, life has already been found on the sea floor, where there is no light at all.

"Most of the bold feet are so thick that no light reaches the sea floor underneath," said a researcher,

Last year a team found a team on a boulder

almost a kilometer below the surface of the sea , protected by an antarctic shelf, on the Seabed.

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"We know very little about life among the floating mischief of the Antarctic. Schelfeis covers about a third of the continental shelf - 1.5 million square kilometers - but our knowledge is based on a handful of bores through the mischief," said the. Scientist.

The

algal flowers may be able to survive even in the coldest months of Antarctic (picture: Getty Images)

"These holes give us small snapshots of what lives on the sea floor and in the water column, but most of it What we know comes from short video clips and photos that cover a very small area. "

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