World: Moscow and Kiev once again reproach each other for new attacks at the Zaporiyia nuclear power plant

Peter Dutton to consider proposing nuclear energy in Australia

  Peter Dutton to consider proposing nuclear energy in Australia Liberal leader Peter Dutton has launched a review into whether the party should back nuclear power at the 2025 federal election. Despite being emissions free, nuclear power has been banned in Australia since 1998 under Commonwealth laws. © Provided by Daily Mail Opposition Leader Peter Dutton addresses Coalition Members and Senators during a Coalition party room meeting on Tuesday In Government the Liberal-National Coalition said bi-partisan support from both sides of politics was needed to reverse the ban.

Russia and Ukraine have once again accused each other of attacks at the Zaporiyia nuclear power plant in recent hours, despite warnings from the UN nuclear agency that they are "playing with fire" and that the risk of a nuclear disaster "is very serious".

File image of Ukrainian soldiers in Kharkov, Ukraine. - -/Ukrinform/dpa © Provided by News 360 File image of Ukrainian soldiers in Kharkov, Ukraine. - -/Ukrinform/dpa

According to Russia, the Ukrainian Army has fired a missile at the plant during the night, while the Ukrainian nuclear authority, Energoatom, has singled out Russian forces for opening fire on the facility.

"Tonight, Ukrainian armed formations launched an attack with a 220 mm Hurricane MLRS cluster rocket. Approaching the power units, the rocket released fragmentation submunitions" that caused the material damage, the Russian administration occupying the town of Energodar, near the plant, has learned in a report carried by Russia's TASS news agency.

Ukraine warns of risk of hydrogen leakage and possible fires at attacked Zaporiyia power plant

  Ukraine warns of risk of hydrogen leakage and possible fires at attacked Zaporiyia power plant Ukrainian nuclear power operator Energoatom warned Saturday that the Zaporiyia nuclear power plant is in danger of a hydrogen leak and a possible fire following attacks in the past two days for which Moscow and Kiev are blaming each other.

Both reports agree that the attack damaged a spent nuclear fuel storage facility and several sensors used to detect radiation.

"Three sensors have been damaged by enemy fire," Energoatom said. "Now the nuclear power plant staff will not be able to detect in time if there is a radiation leak from the containers with spent fuel," it has lamented.

"A station employee was also injured. He received shrapnel wounds and was hospitalized," the operator has added on its Telegram account.

This Saturday, the secretary general of the International Atomic Energy Organization (IAEA), Rafael Grossi, warned that the attacks in recent days in Zaporiyia are "increasingly alarming."

"It underlines the very real risk of a nuclear disaster that could threaten public health and the environment in Ukraine and beyond," he has warned. Military activity around the power plant "must be avoided at all costs," Grossi has stressed.

The World Needs to Wake Up to Putin’s Nuclear Terrorism .
To Russia’s long list of crimes against humanity associated with its invasion of Ukraine, we must add nuclear terrorism. While many worried that Russia might use nuclear weapons if the war grew more desperate for them—and senior U.S. government officials do not rule that possibility out—Moscow has already done something that could have similarly catastrophic consequences. In early March, Russian forces seized the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power station. Since then, they have taken a number of steps, each of which has raised the risk of a nuclear disaster. They have turned the facility into a military base. They have mined parts of the facility.

See also