TOP News

World: Finland to bar Russians after Putin’s mobilisation order

Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the Russian army 'is not able to fight' as the Kremlin plans troop mobilisation

  Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the Russian army 'is not able to fight' as the Kremlin plans troop mobilisation As thousands look to leave Russia following Vladimir Putin's troop mobilisation, European nations are divided on whether to welcome those fleeing the draft. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the Russian mobilisation is a tacit acknowledgement that its "army is not able to fight".Speaking with a US broadcaster, the Ukrainian leader also said he was bracing for more Russian strikes on Ukraine's electrical infrastructure, as the Kremlin ramps up pressure on Ukraine and its Western backers in anticipation of a difficult winter."They will shoot missiles, and they will target our electric grid.

Finland will refuse entry to Russians with Schengen tourist visas starting Friday, following a surge in arrivals after Moscow’s mobilisation order to fight in the war in Ukraine.

“The decision aims to completely prevent the current situation of Russian tourism to Finland and the related transit through Finland,” Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto told a news conference on Thursday, adding Moscow’s mobilisation announcement’s “significant impact” on Helsinki’s decision.

On September 21, President Vladimir Putin announced a partial mobilisation in Russia following Ukraine’s success in counterattacking Moscow’s troops.

Kazakhstan to ‘ensure safety’ of Russians fleeing draft

  Kazakhstan to ‘ensure safety’ of Russians fleeing draft President Tokayev says his country must take care of those escaping ‘hopeless situation’ in neighbouring Russia.“A lot of people from Russia have come here over the last few days,” Tokayev said in a speech on Tuesday.

Putin argued he was defending Russian territories and said the West wanted to destroy his country.

According to Finland’s new rules, Russians entering the country for work, study and family visits – such as trips to see one’s parents, grandparents and children – will still be allowed in, local news outlet Helsingin Sanomat reported.

Passengers of a bus from Russia to Finland walk to the border control at the Vaalimaa border checkpoint in Virolahti, Finland, on September 23, 2022 [Sasu Makinen/Lehtikuva/Finland OUT/AFP] © Provided by Al Jazeera Passengers of a bus from Russia to Finland walk to the border control at the Vaalimaa border checkpoint in Virolahti, Finland, on September 23, 2022 [Sasu Makinen/Lehtikuva/Finland OUT/AFP]

As of September 1, Finland slashed the number of visas, including for tourism purposes, issued to Russian citizens to one-tenth of the typical number, a move seen as a show of solidarity with Ukraine.

of the Russians flee in Finland, fearing a closed border "forever"

 of the Russians flee in Finland, fearing a closed border © VIKEN KANTARCI worried about a possible closure of the border "forever" after the Moscow Order of Moscow for the War in Ukraine, a number Crescent of Russians of fighting age flee, via Finland, at the border post of Vaalimaa. © Alessandro Rampazzo of people queuing in the passport control zone at the border post of Vaalimaa, September 29, 2022 in Finland "Now I believe that your status is not important.

Another European Union member Latvia, shortly after Putin’s announcement said it would not offer refuge to any Russians escaping Moscow’s mobilisation of troops.

Meanwhile, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, at least 2,400 anti-war protesters were arrested in demonstrations across Russia against mobilisation. It was reported that many of those arrested were handed draft notices by the authorities.

The order for mobilisation came a day after Putin gave his support to referendums on joining Russia that were held this week in four occupied Ukrainian regions, the first step to formally annexing a chunk of Ukraine the size of Hungary.

Moscow-installed administrations in the four regions of southern and eastern Ukraine claimed on Tuesday night that 93 percent of ballots cast in Zaporizhia supported annexation, as did 87 percent in the Kherson region, 98 percent in the Luhansk region and 99 percent in Donetsk.

However, Western nations including the United States and Canada have dismissed the referendums as a meaningless “sham” staged by Moscow in an attempt to legitimise its invasion of Ukraine launched on February 24.

Russians Terrified by Putin’s Bunker Mentality as He Turns 70 With His Finger on the Nuclear Button .
Only a handful of people know the exact location where President Vladimir Putin is celebrating his 70th birthday in St. Petersburg on Friday, but critics say he spends more and more of his time isolated deep inside nuclear bunkers. The Kremlin has announced that Putin will spend his birthday working. Mired, as he is, in the biggest self-made disaster of his presidency, that just raises more worrying questions about what kind of orders he’s going to issue on his big day.

See also