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News: SNEAK PREVIEW: New look for next year’s IndyCars

5 Tip-Offs to Mechanic Rip-Offs

  5 Tip-Offs to Mechanic Rip-Offs Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Unless you’re a car mechanic yourself, dealing with a repair shop may require a leap of faith. But if you pay attention to what your mechanic says (and does), you’ll find clues that could tell you whether you’re being bamboozled. Here are some things mechanics may say when they’re planning to take you for a ride—and we don’t mean in your car.

2018 IndyCar Aerokit Concept © Autofile.ca 2018 IndyCar Aerokit Concept

The 101st Indianapolis 500 is scheduled to run this Sunday, May 28, 2017, but this will be the last year these cars race in their current configurations. For the 2018 season they’ll get a brand new “body kit” that defines the look and the aerodynamic surfaces of the cars.

Unlike today, all the cars in the series will use the same two body kits – one for high-speed superspeedways, like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, where the Indy 500 is held, and the other for short ovals and road and street courses, like Toronto, where they race each July.


How to Inspect Car Belts and Hoses

  How to Inspect Car Belts and Hoses Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. A belt or hose failure can cause an overheated engine, loss of power steering, and loss of the electrical charging syste m. If a hose leaks coolant or the belt turning the water pump snaps, the cooling system is inoperable. If the engine overheats, it can suffer serious internal damage that requires expensive repairs and can ruin a summer vacation.Overheating can occur anytime, but usually happens in the summer. Underhood temperatures are much higher, and heat can trigger or accelerate deterioration of rubber compounds.

There are two engine suppliers for the race series – Chevrolet and Honda – and each engine supplier now also provides its own aerodynamic body kits. Currently, Honda-powered cars seem to have an aerodynamic edge with their superspeedway kits but the Chevrolet-powered cars have demonstrated an edge on the shorter tracks where higher downforce is required.

Next year, that bodywork difference will be eliminated as the two aero kits will be provided for all competitors by a single source. The change back to common bodywork is expected to reduce the development cost for participating engine providers as well as putting a focus back on their engine performance differences.

The latest images released by IndyCar give an approximate definition of the sleek new universal bodywork kit that will be fitted to the current Dallara IR-12 chassis in 2018. Details remain to be determined, based in part on the results of on-track testing, which is scheduled to begin by mid-summer.

Great Used-Car Bargains Hide among the New-Car Losers

  Great Used-Car Bargains Hide among the New-Car Losers Great Used-Car Bargains Hide among the New-Car Losers Automobiles are crazy expensive, and nobody wants to buy a shoddy product that bleeds us dry, whether it's new or used. We want long-term quality, but nearly every single one of us is blinded by our past experiences and by the billions spent on advertising campaigns that aim to keep us on a straight and narrow path of popular brands and models. We miss the better deals because those screwy headlights in our minds automatically assume that the marketplace ahead is limited to a few good choices.

The supplier of the universal kit has yet to be finalized, but IndyCar says it has been reverse-designed to start with a look of iconic Indy cars of the past while also incorporating the latest technological and safety advancements. The car with the very small front and rear wings in the accompanying photographs is intended to represent a potential superspeedway application, while the one with the huge wings front and rear is more representative of a short-oval/road-course/street-course setup.

The car with the very small front and rear wings in the accompanying photographs is intended to represent a potential superspeedway application, while the one with the huge wings front and rear is more representative of a short-oval/road-course/street-course setup.

Your Car Could Be the Next Ransomware Target .
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. The recent "WannaCry" ransomware attack that crippled computer systems around the globe has highlighted the digital vuln erabilities in our daily lives.One you might not have considered is your car, which increasingly relies on computer chips and more than 100 million lines of computer code to operate.Autos Tips: Jump-Starting Your Car Click to expand Your browser does not support this video require(["binding"], function (binding) { binding("wcVideoPlayer", "#video_player_ec20ca1c-228e-4f2d-a6d7-73130d1080e1").

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