TOP News

Canada: Ground search plans at former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Ontario to be announced soon

B.C. First Nation says more than 160 unmarked graves found

  B.C. First Nation says more than 160 unmarked graves found The Penelakut Tribe in B.C.'s Southern Gulf Islands says it has found more than 160 "undocumented and unmarked" graves in the area, which was also once home to the Kuper Island Residential School. The school operated from 1890 to the 1970s on Penelakut Island, formerly known as Kuper Island. The Penelakut Tribe in B.C.'s Southern Gulf Islands says it has found more than 160 "undocumented and unmarked" graves in the area, which was also once home to the Ku The tribe informed neighbouring First Nations communities of the discovery in a newsletter posted online on Monday morning.

Mark Hill, elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River, says the ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., needs to start as soon as possible. © Bobby Hristova/CBC Mark Hill, elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River, says the ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in Brantford, Ont., needs to start as soon as possible.

The elected chief of Six Nations of the Grand River says plans of a ground search at the former Mohawk Institute Residential School will be announced in the coming days.

It will be the start of a solemn journey "in the hopes of recovering all of our children," Mark Hill told reporters in Brantford, Ont., on Monday afternoon.

"We're hoping to start the search as soon as possible ... we need to find all of them," he said, with more than 100 shoes and toys spread out behind him on the stairs of the former residential school.

Plaque donated by residential school teacher elders say abused children removed from Sask. church

  Plaque donated by residential school teacher elders say abused children removed from Sask. church Elders from the Cote First Nation in Saskatchewan have succeeded in getting a plaque removed from the property of St. Philip's Roman Catholic Church in Kamsack that they say was donated by a music teacher who sexually abused Indigenous boys who were forced to attend the St. Philip's Indian Residential School.According to elders, the plaque was donated by Ralph Gray, a longtime music teacher at the St. Philip's Indian Residential School, which operated from 1928 to 1969. Gray has since died.

Hill said the initiative will be survivor-led and a group is being formed to determine how to search the grounds.

He said work is underway to get funding from the federal and provincial governments, adding the initial ask was for $10 million.

Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site, in an effort to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves, as have been discovered in other parts of Canada.

It all started in May, with the discovery of grave sites near a former school in Kamloops, B.C. Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation said preliminary findings from a survey of the site by ground-penetrating radar, combined with previous knowledge and oral history, indicated 215 children had been buried at the site.

Regina archbishop attends Cote First Nation gathering of residential school survivors

  Regina archbishop attends Cote First Nation gathering of residential school survivors The survivors shared painful, graphic stories of their time at the St. Philip's Indian Residential School in Kamsack, Sask.Survivors at the Cote First Nation told Regina Archbishop Donald Bolen he was brave for making the effort, but told him talk is useless without action.

a vintage photo of a house: Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site of the Mohawk Institute, to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves. © Canada Dept. of the Interior/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043613 Hill and survivors have been asking for a search at the site of the Mohawk Institute, to determine if it too is the location of unmarked graves.

John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 years old when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School.

He was known as No. 72.


Video: Calls for the Canadian government to provide money for investigations at former residential school sites (Global News)

"The first day they brought us here, we ran away, me and my brother," he said.

Every Christmas, he and his brother would run back home to Six Nations.

Elliott said searching the grounds is a "great idea."

"I think there's a few boys around here."

The Mohawk Institute opened in 1828 as a day school for boys from the reserve before it started accepting boarders and girls in 1834.

"The intent was ... to change us, to make us someone other than who we are," Hill said.

Researchers say that TB at residential schools was no accident

  Researchers say that TB at residential schools was no accident (ANNews) – Two experts in tuberculosis say the mass death from TB at residential schools was no accident, but the result of deliberate neglect that was part of Canada’s broader genocidal project. Lena Faust, a PhD student at the McGill International TB Centre in Montreal, and Courtney Heffernan, manager of the Tuberculosis Program Evaluation and Research Unit at the University of Alberta, acknowledged in a July 12 Globe and Mail op-ed that it’s unknown how many of the children whose remains were uncovered from unmarked graves in the past two months died as a result of TB.

He said the school closed in 1970, making it one of the oldest and longest running residential schools in Canada.

Two years later, the Woodland Cultural Centre opened in the school building. It serves as a museum and provides education about the Mohawk Institute's history.

a man wearing a hat: John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School, where he remained with his brother from 1946 to 1952. © Bobby Hristova/CBC John Elliott, 84, said he was 10 when he entered the Mohawk Institute Residential School, where he remained with his brother from 1946 to 1952.

Dawn and Roberta Hill, sisters who survived the school, have been part of the planning to search the grounds.

They hope the nothing will be found, but still think the search is needed.

Roberta said she's optimistic, but won't believe the search is happening until she sees it.

"Until there's a cheque in hand, I don't trust anybody," she said.

"But I think ... it would look pretty bad if they did back out. The whole community wants this to be done."

Do you have information about unmarked graves, children who never came home or residential school staff and operations? Email your tips to CBC's new Indigenous-led team investigating residential schools: [email protected].

Acclaimed TV series 'Mohawk Girls' makes U.S. debut on NBC streamer Peacock .
MONTREAL — U.S. viewers are getting a chance to meet the "Mohawk Girls." NBC's streaming service Peacock has picked up the acclaimed TV series, which originally aired on APTN from 2014 to 2017. "Mohawk Girls" follows four women in their 20s as they try to find a balance between work, love, sex, culture and community. The half-hour dramatic comedy was created by Tracey Deer and Cynthia Knight, based on Deer's 2005 documentary of the same name. Video: Cast Previews 'Ted Lasso' Season 2 (ET Canada) Your browser does not support this video Rezolution Pictures says all five seasons of "Mohawk Girls" started streaming in the United States earlier this month.

See also