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Canada: Reader letter: Strict rules surrounding COVID-19 appreciated

A look at the latest COVID-19 news in Canada

  A look at the latest COVID-19 news in Canada A look at the latest COVID-19 news in Canada: — Quebec Premier François Legault says the number of daily COVID-19 cases in Quebec appears to have peaked, allowing him to lift the curfew on Monday that he imposed to protect hospitals from a record surge in infections. Health experts project that COVID-19-related hospitalizations, which were at an unprecedented 2,994 on Thursday, should peak in the coming days, Legault told reporters in Montreal. Legault introduced the 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew on Dec. 31 — in time to ban people from the streets on New Year's Eve. He had imposed a curfew earlier in 2021 for almost five months, between January and May.

Re: Reader letter: Sad how Canadians are losing their freedom, by Jim Jovanovich, Dec. 31

Jennifer Eriksson is tested as passengers arrive at Toronto's Pearson airport after mandatory coronavirus testing took effect for international arrivals in Mississauga February 1, 2021. © Provided by Windsor Star Jennifer Eriksson is tested as passengers arrive at Toronto's Pearson airport after mandatory coronavirus testing took effect for international arrivals in Mississauga February 1, 2021.

Our forefathers who fought and died for freedom did so against mad men leaders who wanted to conquer innocent countries, wipe out ethnic groups, such as Jewish people, and wanted to run the world with imaginary superior races.

Military soldiers get 12 vaccinations or boosters for polio, measles, hepatitis A & B — and the latest, COVID-19.

How the flouting of COVID-19 restrictions by leaders damages credibility and trust

  How the flouting of COVID-19 restrictions by leaders damages credibility and trust It's not just in Britain where stories about rule-breaking rule-makers who undermine important messaging have made headlines over the course of the pandemic.Johnson offered one such apology this past Wednesday for attending a BYOB garden party in May 2020 involving dozens of Downing Street staff, held in contravention of COVID-19 restrictions that Britons were supposed to be following at the time.

Justin Trudeau I feel will go down in history as a weak prime minister who frequently put the burden on the provincial premiers to make hard decisions on mandatory vaccination for physicians, nurses or anyone on government payrolls.

Thank you Windsor’s city council, CEO David Musyj and to a lesser extent Ontario Premier Doug Ford for having the courage to implement the COVID-19 rules that are in place.

Canadian flags should be flown at half mast for the more than 30,000 Canadians who have died dead from the virus.

Roughly 80 per cent of Canadians have been vaccinated. I hope our leaders continue to have the wisdom to take the side of the overwhelming majority.

Freedoms and rights are always brought up. Where are mine if I need a cancerous tumour removed, heart valve replacement, leg or hip replaced and I’m told the needed operation has been canceled because of COVID-19 patients taking up so many beds in hospitals?

Personally, if I walk into a restaurant and they do not ask me for proof of vaccination, name and phone number, I will walk out.

William Gatto Sr., Amherstburg

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Interest rate announcement, COVID rates across Canada: In The News for Jan. 26 .
In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what's on the radar of our editors for the morning of Jan. 26 What we are watching in Canada Economic eyes will be on the Bank of Canada this morning as the central bank is scheduled to make an announcement about its trendsetting interest rate. Some economists are expecting the central bank to raise its key policy rate from its rock-bottom level of 0.25 per cent, marking the first of multiple hikes over the course of 2022.

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