Canada: Work set to begin on replacing Newfoundland's rodent-infested, 19th-century jail

Montreal Alliance falls to lowly Newfoundland at Verdun Auditorium

  Montreal Alliance falls to lowly Newfoundland at Verdun Auditorium In a battle of cellar-dwelling teams, the Montreal Alliance lost 94-71 to the Newfoundland Growlers in Canadian Elite Basketball League action at the Verdun Auditorium on Friday night. With the loss, Montreal’s record dropped to 4-12, including 4-4 at home. Newfoundland improved to 4-12. The teams share last place in the standings. Reserve forward Nathan Cayo led the way for the Alliance with 18 points on 8-of-12 shooting. Guard Alain Louis added 11 points and Hernst Laroche 10. Kemy Ossé scored only 7 points on 2-of-7 shooting, including 2-for-6 from deep. Video: Canadian men's relay team secures spot in final at world championships (cbc.

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. — The Newfoundland and Labrador government says a company has been selected to prepare the land where a replacement for its crumbling, 1850s-era jail will be built.

  Work set to begin on replacing Newfoundland's rodent-infested, 19th-century jail © Provided by The Canadian Press

The Department of Justice said in a release today it has awarded a contract for site remediation at the 12-hectare spot in the east end of St. John's, N.L.

The new jail will accommodate 264 inmates in medium- and high-security settings, as well as 12 beds for community reintegration.

It will replace Her Majesty's Penitentiary, which was built in 1859 and has long faced criticism from inmates, lawyers and advocates for its disintegrating infrastructure.

A provincial Supreme Court judge highlighted the facility's rodent problems in a decision earlier this month, saying inmates had to hang their food from the ceiling in order to keep it away from the mice.

The Justice Department says it expects a proposal for the new facility later this year.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 27, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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