TOP News

Canada: Mark Meadows burned several documents in final weeks of Trump administration

The Jan. 6 Committee Thinks Some Trump Allies Lied to Them—and Mark Meadows Provided the Roadmap

  The Jan. 6 Committee Thinks Some Trump Allies Lied to Them—and Mark Meadows Provided the Roadmap The committee suspects Trump aides falsely claimed under oath to not recall facts, and that Mark Meadows' book influenced their answers.That was among the details in the 154-page document the committee released on Monday, which it said was an executive summary to the final report that will be made public later this week.

  Mark Meadows burned several documents in final weeks of Trump administration © Provided by Washington Examiner

Former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows burned several documents in his office fireplace roughly a dozen times in the final weeks of the Trump administration, according to newly released testimony published by the Jan. 6 committee.

During the final month of Trump’s term in office, Meadows was seen putting documents into his fireplace once or twice a week throughout December 2020, according to testimony from then-White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson. It’s not clear what documents were burned in the fireplace, but the incidents typically occurred after Meadows came out of meetings with other officials, she said.

Jan. 6 committee postpones release of final report on Capitol attack, Trump

  Jan. 6 committee postpones release of final report on Capitol attack, Trump The Jan. 6 report will culminate an 18-month inquiry into what led to the worst attack on the Capitol since 1814 and what happened that day. With Republicans who labeled the panel partisan and illegitimate taking control of the House in January, the report will be the committee’s last opportunity to summarize its findings and make recommendations aimed at preventing another attack.Here is what we know so far:The report will have at least eight chapters, which track the blockbuster hearings the committee held in August.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION DRAFTED MEMO CALLING TO FIRE STAFFERS WHO DIDN’T BELIEVE 2020 ELECTION WAS RIGGED

“Roughly a dozen times I remember seeing him, and it was when we would have the General Services Administration staff come light it first thing in the morning, and then they had logs next to his fireplace and his closet, too,” Hutchinson told the Jan. 6 committee. “Throughout the day, he would put more logs on the fireplace to keep it burning throughout the day. And I recall roughly a dozen times where he would take the [fireplace cover] off and then throw a few more pieces of paper in with it when he put more logs on the fireplace.”

The White House has specific policies for burning documents rather than throwing materials into trash cans, Hutchinson said. All documents that staffers wish to discard must be placed into burn bags that are then classified based on their contents.

Publix grocery heiress was willing to give up to $3 million to the pro-Trump Jan. 6 rally, transcript reveals

  Publix grocery heiress was willing to give up to $3 million to the pro-Trump Jan. 6 rally, transcript reveals Julie Fancelli reportedly gave money to conservative figures Charlie Kirk, Alex Jones, and Roger Stone, and said in a text: "Charlie Kirk is my hero."Before testifying in the investigation launched against her former boss' involvement in the Capitol riots, Hicks was the youngest White House communications director in history. But prior to joining the 2016 Trump campaign, she had no political experience.

“It’s standing protocol, I believe, for previous and future administrations, too, for record-keeping purposes,” Hutchinson testified. “The Presidential Records Act only asks that you keep the original copy of a document. … However, I don’t know if [the documents Meadows burned] were the first or original copies of anything. It’s entirely possible that he had put things in his fireplace that he also would have put into a burn bag that there were duplicates of or that there was an electronic copy of.”

Hutchinson recalled one specific instance in which Meadows burned documents after a meeting with Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) about the vice president’s role in the certification of the 2020 election on Jan. 6, 2021. Beginning in December 2020, Perry began meeting with Meadows to discuss “what he believed could happen on Jan. 6,” Hutchinson testified.

During these meetings, Perry would bring physical papers to the White House and the pair would prepare various PowerPoint presentations, according to Hutchinson.

Ivanka Trump grew 'visibly upset' as she failed to get her father to rein in his supporters on Jan. 6, before retreating to an office

  Ivanka Trump grew 'visibly upset' as she failed to get her father to rein in his supporters on Jan. 6, before retreating to an office The January 6 committee report details how aides to Donald Trump, including Ivanka, implored him to help stop the attack on the Capitol. Ivanka Trump appeared "visibly upset" after she attempted to persuade her father, then-President Donald Trump, to call off his supporters as they attacked the Capitol on January 6, 2021, a report by the House committee investigating the riot found.

“I remember one time, his door was propped open. He put a few things in the fireplace,” Hutchinson said. “And there were a few people in the office with him, but I don’t remember who else was. Mr. Perry brought a few other people to meet him.”

At the time, Perry was “directly involved” with efforts to appoint Jeffrey Clark as the attorney general in order to back now-former President Donald Trump’s claims the 2020 election was influenced by widespread voter fraud, according to the Jan. 6 committee.

Hutchinson’s testimony was released on Tuesday as part of the committee’s latest evidence dump detailing its investigation into the Capitol riot.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The committee's full report exceeds 800 pages, including four appendices that focus on security at the Capitol, the National Guard's slow deployment, how foreign adversaries used Trump's election claims to their advantage, and the financial backing of the "Stop the Steal" rally that devolved into the riot. The panel also voted to refer Trump to the Department of Justice for criminal prosecution.

GOP Sen. Mike Lee said that 'Rudy is walking malpractice' after Giuliani left him an accidental voicemail on January 6

  GOP Sen. Mike Lee said that 'Rudy is walking malpractice' after Giuliani left him an accidental voicemail on January 6 "You can't make this up," Lee texted Robert O'Brien after getting a voicemail intended for Sen. Tommy Tuberville. "Rudy is walking malpractice."Before testifying in the investigation launched against her former boss' involvement in the Capitol riots, Hicks was the youngest White House communications director in history. But prior to joining the 2016 Trump campaign, she had no political experience.

Overall, the report seeks to prove Trump is liable for the violence at the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, when a mob of his supporters tried to halt Congress from certifying the electoral vote counting that formalized Joe Biden's election as president.

Washington Examiner Videos

Tags: January 6 Committee, January 6, Mark Meadows, Trump administration, White House

Original Author: Cami Mondeaux

Original Location: Mark Meadows burned several documents in final weeks of Trump administration

Former Trump White House aide told Jan. 6 panel Mark Meadows burned documents a dozen times during the transition period .
The January 6 committee released another batch of transcripts Tuesday, including two more of its interviews with blockbuster witness Cassidy Hutchinson and testimony from several other Trump White House officials. The latest batch reveals new details about Hutchinson’s dueling loyalties that led her to ultimately switch lawyers and provide damning testimony about what she saw and heard at the White House after the 2020 election. One of the transcripts released Tuesday was her final deposition with her initial, Trump-funded lawyer, Stefan Passantino, which was conducted on May 17.

See also