TOP News

Canada: Everyone likes parks, concludes $150,000 Parks Canada survey

Tim Horton’s reputation plummets in new survey — why Canadians may be fed up

  Tim Horton’s reputation plummets in new survey — why Canadians may be fed up Tim Horton’s reputation plummets in new survey — why Canadians may be fed upTim Hortons' reputation has taken a hit, according to a new survey, and experts believe it's linked to its reduction in employee benefits.

Fortess of Louisbourg: A couple of costumed interpreters walk through the restored Fortress of Louisbourg. According to the report, Canadians enjoy historic sites primarily for their historic connections.© Postmedia File A couple of costumed interpreters walk through the restored Fortress of Louisbourg. According to the report, Canadians enjoy historic sites primarily for their historic connections.

A $150,000 Parks Canada survey has concluded that Canadians enjoy parks and like to be in them very much.

“Enjoyment of Canada’s national parks and historic sites and waterways in the summer of 2017 was almost universal among visitors,” says the report prepared by EKOS Research Associates.

Specifically, 94 per cent of visitors to Canada’s national parks during the summer months reported that they “enjoyed” it.

The Trudeau Liberals are failing to turn economic success into votes

  The Trudeau Liberals are failing to turn economic success into votes The Trudeau Liberals are failing to turn economic success into votes0000

Five per cent deemed the parks “average” and only a mysterious one per cent of respondents reported that they “did not enjoy” the likes of Banff National Park, the Rideau Canal or the Halifax Citadel.

The survey was based on telephone interviews with 3,000 Canadians who visited a Parks Canada site during the summer of 2017. That year saw historically high rates of park use as a result of fees being removed in celebration of Canada’s sesquicentennial.

The report was delivered to Parks Canada in November, but has just been made publicly available through Library and Archives Canada.

While data is important to the running of any government agency, many of the conclusions of the report may come off as a bit obvious.

“Scenery” and “natural surroundings” ranked as the number one most-enjoyed thing about Canada’s national parks, followed by “physical activity access” in a distant second place.

Doug Ford targets seats in northern Ontario, long a wasteland for PC party

  Doug Ford targets seats in northern Ontario, long a wasteland for PC party Doug Ford targets seats in northern Ontario, long a wasteland for PC party Maydo is co-owner of a mechanical contracting firm in Thunder Bay, a city that has sent Liberals to Queen's Park for 23 years straight.

The categories of “water/beaches” and “wildlife/animals” also made a strong showing in terms of enjoyment.

“Those visitors between the ages of 45 and 54 were more likely than older and younger visitors to point to the water … as central to their enjoyment of the visit,” the report says.

While enjoyment levels were similarly meteoric for historic sites, the survey nonetheless found that Canadians enjoyed them for different reasons. “Among historic site visitors, the opportunity to learn about the site and its historic contribution was key,” the report says.

The report also made sure to distinguish visitor “satisfaction” from visitor “enjoyment.” Although, perhaps unsurprisingly, virtually every visitor who had enjoyed their visit also pronounced it satisfying.

The survey generally failed to yield any coherent information on areas where Parks Canada could improve, with suggestions ranging from “more advertising” to “better food” to “improve restrooms.”

NASA's new planet-hunter to seek closer, Earth-like worlds

  NASA's new planet-hunter to seek closer, Earth-like worlds NASA is poised to launch a $337 million washing machine-sized spacecraft that aims to vastly expand mankind's search for planets beyond our solar system, particularly closer, Earth-sized ones that might harbor life. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, is scheduled to launch Monday at 6:32 pm (2232 GMT) atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Its main goal over the next two years is to scan more than 200,000 of the brightest stars for signs of planets circling them and causing a dip in brightness known as a transit.

However, a small plurality of respondents noted that they would prefer to continue not paying park fees.

The dubious utility of national park surveys is not specific to Canada.

IK20170321-028.JPG: Bison graze at Elk Island National Park. Most visitors to national parks seek out scenes like these and are satisfied to encounter them.© Ian Kucerak / Postmedia Bison graze at Elk Island National Park. Most visitors to national parks seek out scenes like these and are satisfied to encounter them.

The U.S. National Park Service similarly carries out regular visitor satisfaction surveys, only to discover almost universal approval for their sites.

In their most recent survey, the U.S. National Park Service only found two sites that didn’t score an approval rating higher than 90 per cent: Manhattan’s Castle Clinton (79 per cent) and Tennessee’s Fort Donelson (88 per cent).

• Twitter: TristinHopper | Email: [email protected]

SpaceX blasts off NASA's new planet-hunter, TESS .
NASA on Wednesday blasted off its newest planet-hunting spacecraft, TESS, a $337 million satellite that aims to scan 85 percent of the skies for cosmic bodies where life may exist. "Three, two, one and liftoff!" said a NASA commentator as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) soared into the blue sky atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:51 pm (2251 GMT).The washing machine-sized spacecraft is built to search outside the solar system, scanning the nearest, brightest stars for signs of periodic dimming. These so-called "transits" may mean that planets are in orbit around them.

See also