Offbeat: Bulgaria chooses a new parliament

Colombia: Taking advantage of a new law, a senator comes with his horse to the Parliament

 Colombia: Taking advantage of a new law, a senator comes with his horse to the Parliament An elected ecologist thinks that he wanted to "ridicule" the choice of parliament to authorize parliamentarians to come with their pets © AFP Colombian senator Alio Barrera and his horse, in front of Parliament, in Bogota on September 27, 2022. Animal protection - an elected ecologist thinks that he wanted to "ridicule" the choice of parliament to authorize parliamentarians To come with their pets is a world first that has led to an atypical consequence.

in Bulgaria will be chosen for the fourth time on Sunday a new parliament. In June, the government of Liberal Prime Minister Kiril Petkow was overthrown in office after only seven months by a vote of no confidence. Petkow's newly founded party "We continue the change" (PP) is around 16 percent in the surveys, the Conservative Party of its predecessor Bojko Borissow is around 25 percent.

In Bulgarien wird am Sonntag zum vierten Mal binnen 18 Monaten ein neues Parlament gewählt. Im Juni war die Regierung des liberalen Ministerpräsidenten Kiril Petkow nach nur sieben Monaten im Amt durch ein Misstrauensvotum gestürzt worden. © Nikolay Doychinov In Bulgaria, a new parliament will be chosen for the fourth time within 18 months. In June, the government of Liberal Prime Minister Kiril Petkow was overthrown in office after only seven months by a vote of no confidence.

The election campaign in the poorest EU member state was dominated by the Ukraine War and the uncertain gas deliveries. Bulgaria is historically and culturally very closely linked to Moscow. The invasion of Ukraine has caused deep divisions in the country with its 6.5 million inhabitants. While Borrissow tries not to endanger relationships with both the EU and Russia and Turkey, Petkow took a clear pro-European attitude in the election campaign.

Noe/KBH

Carson Jerema: Canada, where the rule of law goes to die .
I have a solution for all of Canada’s problems, at least as they pertain to the coming battles between the Trudeau Liberals and the not-quite separatists in both Quebec and Alberta. Let’s all accept once and for all that the Constitution, frozen in time and awkwardly imported from Great Britain as it is, is merely a set of suggestions. The Constitution’s text may clearly lay out the separation of powers between the provinces and Ottawa, but no level of government takes it seriously. And Canada’s legal tradition may extend back to the Glorious Revolution, even to Magna Carta, but that doesn’t mean our political leaders behave as if they have a duty to uphold such traditions.

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