TOP News

Sports: Two players ejected for dirty hits in same World Juniors tune-up game

Why 16- and 17-year-old phenoms could steal World Juniors MVP

  Why 16- and 17-year-old phenoms could steal World Juniors MVP Walking through the heart of Toronto’s Dundas West neighbourhood, a giant billboard is adorned with TSN’s promotional slogan for the World Juniors: The Future of Hockey Lives Here. It’s a clever slogan for the network, which has become synonymous with its decades-long coverage of the tournament, but this year poses an interesting wrinkle to the thesis: how far into the future are we looking, when the two best players in this year’s iteration are just 16 years old? With due respect to the rest of the competition, Canada’s 16-year-old phenom Connor Bedard, 17-year-old Shane Wright (who turns 18 on Jan. 5) and Russia’s wunderkind Matvei Michkov (who turned 17 on Dec.

As anticipation builds toward the start of the world junior hockey championship on Boxing Day, the competing nations are putting the final touches on their squads, with the potential of international glory right around the corner.

There were multiple game misconducts doled out in the Finland-USA game. There were multiple game misconducts doled out in the Finland-USA game.

But the emotions of the buildup toward the tournament seemed to have gotten out of control in a tune-up game between Finland and the United States on Thursday.

In the first period, Finnish defenceman Ruben Rafkin was assessed a major penalty and a game misconduct for a knee-on-knee hit on American forward Brett Berard.

NFL COVID-19 tracker: Updated team-by-team list of players in protocol for Week 16

  NFL COVID-19 tracker: Updated team-by-team list of players in protocol for Week 16 Sporting News has the list of all the players who have entered COVID-19 protocols in Week 16.With the increase of positive tests, and the daily positive test record continuing to be broken (right now it's at 51 in one day), the NFL has adjusted its COVID protocols, including increasing testing.

Berard would eventually return to the game.

With his team up 3-1 in the third period, United States forward Red Savage caught Joakim Kemell with an elbow to the head. He was given a five-minute major penalty and a game misconduct, evening up the playing field.

The penalty turned out to be very costly, as Finland roared back to tie the game, scoring twice on its extended power play and forcing overtime.

Toronto Maple Leafs prospect Roni Hirvonen stepped up in the extra frame, jamming a loose puck home to top off his team’s big comeback.

World Junior Championship: One Prospect to Watch from Every NHL Team

  World Junior Championship: One Prospect to Watch from Every NHL Team With the World Junior Championship set to begin on Boxing Day, Rachel Doerrie and Tony Ferrari bring you one prospect from every NHL franchise to watch. © Provided by Hockey News on Sports Illustrated Stan Szeto-USA TODAY Sports It's the ultimate hockey prospect showcase. The 2022 World Junior Championship is finally here, and there's no shortage of top prospects ready to showcase their talents. This year, every NHL team except for Tampa Bay and the New York Islanders, are represented. In Tampa's case, nobody feels bad because they've won the past two Stanley Cups.

The IIHF Disciplinary Committee will surely review both incidents that led to the game misconducts, with the possibility of supplemental discipline to come.

Both Finland and the United States are slated to open their respective tournament schedules on Dec. 26 in Alberta. Team USA will be looking to repeat as champions while the Finns aim to improve on last year's bronze-medal finish.

More from Yahoo Sports

Baseball Hall of Fame 2022: TSN's Ryan Fagan explains his BBWAA ballot .
Here are the eight players I voted for, in alphabetical order by last name: Bobby Abreu, Barry Bonds, Mark Buehrle, Roger Clemens, David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez, Scott Rolen and Gary Sheffield. MORE: The 50 greatest seasons in sports history, ranked For the players who are ballot hold-overs, you’ll see a lot of similar thoughts from previous columns, which are here: for the class of 2021, for the class of 2020, for the class of 2019, for the class of 2018 and for the class of 2017. As always, I tried to explain my thinking not just on the players I voted for, but those whose names were not marked on my ballot.

See also