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Sports: Baseball Hall of Fame 2023: Carlos Beltran headlines newcomers on next BBWAA ballot

Government extends repayment deadline to emergency business account to 2023

  Government extends repayment deadline to emergency business account to 2023 OTTAWA — Businesses struggling under yet another round of lockdowns and capacity restrictions will have an extra year to repay emergency interest-free loans issued by the federal government, but business groups say that might not be enough breathing room for the hardest hit. The Canada Emergency Business Account offered interest-free loans of up to $60,000 to small businesses and not-for-profits. When the government first created the CEBA program at the onset of the pandemic, it set a repayment deadline of Dec. 31, 2022, for anyone who wanted to take advantage of zero interest and having a portion of the loan forgiven.

The power of the thunder and lightning that accompanied the release of the class of the 2022 Hall of Fame ballot — and the discussion about the ballot and the reveal of the final vote totals — will be turned down a few notches when we do this all again next winter.

  Baseball Hall of Fame 2023: Carlos Beltran headlines newcomers on next BBWAA ballot © Provided by Sporting News

For one thing, the controversial 10th-year trio of Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling is off the ballot. And the newcomer class doesn’t have nearly the same level of intrigue as the class of 2022 newbies. It would have been tough for anyone to top the level of debate sparked by the arrival of Alex Rodriguez and David Ortiz, but the only newcomer with a shot at being elected isn’t free of controversy.

Former CFL quarterback Ealey named for induction into College Football Hall of Fame

  Former CFL quarterback Ealey named for induction into College Football Hall of Fame Chuck Ealey no longer has to guess why he's not in the College Football Hall of Fame. Ealey, 72, was named for induction Monday. It comes over 50 years after Ealey completed his collegiate career at Toledo with a 35-0 record as its starting quarterback before embarking on a seven-year CFL career. "I was emotional about it, it was almost an avenue of, 'Oh my goodness, this is over, thank-you,' in the sense that it comes up every year," Ealey saidEaley, 72, was named for induction Monday. It comes over 50 years after Ealey completed his collegiate career at Toledo with a 35-0 record as its starting quarterback before embarking on a seven-year CFL career.

MORE: Ryan Fagan explains his Hall of Fame ballot | Marc Lancaster explains his

Let’s take a look at the potential class of 2023 ballot newcomers. The ballot, by the way, is typically released in mid-to-late November, with ballots due to be postmarked by Dec. 31.

Has the numbers to get in

Carlos Beltran, OF. Beltra had a long and productive career. He's right near the career bWAR for the "average" Hall of Fame center fielder — he's at 70.1, the average is 71.6 — and he’s one of only five players in MLB history with at least 400 homers and 300 stolen bases; he had 435 and 312, respectively. The others are Willie Mays, Andre Dawson, Barry Bonds and Alex Rodriguez. He was an All-Star Game regular, with three Gold Gloves and MVP votes in seven seasons (though often down-ballot).

Seville Research Newcastle for Diego Carlos

 Seville Research Newcastle for Diego Carlos FC Sevilla is not interested in the sale of its central Defender Diego Carlos. © Provided by Football 365 {Persons} During The Liga Match. Sep 29, 2019. (Alterphotos / Manu R.B.) Newcastle United is eager to acquire the defender of FC Sevilla Diego Carlos, but the Andalusians rejected a second offer of magpies. Marca learned that an offer of 25 million euros was presented by the Premier League Club, but Seville is not interested in the sale of its central defender.

But it's not that simple with Beltran. He was heavily involved in the sign-stealing scandal that marred the Astros' 2017 World Series title, and that will impact his chances. Wrote more about that here.

Definitely on the ballot

Francisco Rodriguez, CL. The Hall door seems to be cracking open to relievers, so here’s the question: Has it been forced open wide enough for K-Rod to gain entry during his allotted 10-year span on the BBWAA ballot? If you’re of the thinking that the Hall shouldn’t have only inner-circle closers (Mariano Rivera, Trevor Hoffman, Dennis Eckersley, etc), Rodriguez makes a compelling case. He’s fourth on the career saves list — ahead of Cooperstown residents Eckersley, Rollie Fingers and Bruce Sutter.

And the Angels absolutely don’t win the 2002 World Series without K-Rod as a rookie; he threw 8 2/3 innings of relief in four World Series games! He also had 15 more saves than Billy Wagner, who received XX percent of the vote on this year’s ballot. I am genuinely fascinated to see what his first-year vote totals look like.

Tamron Hall Reflects on Her Career 'Journey' While Honoring Today's 70th Anniversary: 'Grateful'

  Tamron Hall Reflects on Her Career 'Journey' While Honoring Today's 70th Anniversary: 'Grateful' "I'm appreciative of all the stops I made on my journey," Tamron Hall said in a post on FridayTamron Hall is looking back on how far she's come in her broadcast journalism career.

John Lackey, SP. Speaking of that 2002 World Series, the Angels don’t win without Lackey as a rookie, either. He started Game 7 on three days rest — remember, as a rookie! — and held the Giants to one run in five innings. Lackey was a reliable, durable workhorse during his career, but the Hall of Fame ballot is probably as far as his Cooperstown journey goes. His 37.3 career bWAR is tied for 207th all time for starting pitchers, with Bullet Joe Bush and Guy Hecker; the average bWAR for Hall of Fame starting pitchers is 73.0.

Jacoby Ellsbury, OF. The left-handed hitter had some really good years, including his second-place finish in the 2011 AL MVP race and his three seasons with at least 50-plus stolen bases. He’s the only AL player since 1997 with at least 70 stolen bases in a season (2009). Any outside shot at a second-half-of-the-career Cooperstown run ended when it was clear that his time with the Yankees was going to be disappointing, at least, and a debacle at worst.

MORE: What's next for Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Curt Schilling?

Matt Cain, SP. For an eight-year stretch (2006-13), Cain was really special. He averaged 32 starts and 209 innings per year, posting a 3.38 ERA/3.67 FIP. In eight postseason starts (all 2010 and 2012), Cain posted a 2.10 ERA, including only three runs allowed in 14 2/3 World Series innings. And, of course, there was the perfect game in 2012. Injuries, though, are cruel. Cain averaged just 91 innings, with a 5.23 ERA/5.04 FIP his last four years and finished with a 29.3 career bWAR (again, 73.0 is the average SP number). He richly deserves a spot on the ballot and even a few votes, but he won’t reach the 5 percent minimum.

Joe B. Hall, who led Kentucky to 1978 NCAA title, dies at 93

  Joe B. Hall, who led Kentucky to 1978 NCAA title, dies at 93 LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Joe B. Hall, who succeeded Adolph Rupp and guided Kentucky to a national championship in 1978, has died. He was 93. The program announced Hall’s death in a social media post Saturday morning after the coach's family notified current Wildcats coach John Calipari. Hall and Calipari were close, and Hall was a a frequent presence at Kentucky practices and games. The retired coach would sometimes provide the “Y” when cheerleaders spelled out the state name during timeouts. Calipari, who led Kentucky to the program's eighth national title in 2012, called Hall “my friend, my mentor and an icon in our state and in our profession” in a series of tweets.

Jayson Werth, OF. His impact on the field — what he did to establish the Nationals as contenders in D.C. — isn’t necessarily reflected in his statistics. His late arrival as a regular in the big leagues made any sort of legitimate Cooperstown run unrealistic; he had just 825 MLB plate appearances heading into his Age 28 season with the Phillies. He almost certainly won’t reach the minimum to stick around, but he definitely deserves to be on the ballot.

Jonathan Papelbon, CL. Again, the question is, where’s the line for closers? Papelbon spent 10 years as a dominant closer — 2.33 ERA, 10.2 K/9, 0.999 WHIP — and he’s 10th on the all-time saves list. But he only threw 725 2/3 innings, more than 300 fewer than any other pitcher in the Hall of Fame who spent most of his career in the NL/AL; Bruce Sutter, with 1,042 innings, is currently at the bottom. He should be on the ballot, but putting Papelbon in the Hall would require a MASSIVE rethinking of what a Hall of Famer is.

Probably on the ballot

Jered Weaver, SP. Weaver, who was a rotation stalwart for the Angels for 11 seasons, had an outstanding career, with three top-five Cy Young finishes and a career 3.63 ERA. His spot on the ballot would be well-earned.

Jhonny Peralta, SS. Peralta had a long, productive career — three All-Star nods, 30.4 career bWAR — but he’ll mostly be remembered for his Biogenesis suspension of 2013.

MLB nixes plan for Montreal to share a team with Tampa Bay: reports

  MLB nixes plan for Montreal to share a team with Tampa Bay: reports Major League Baseball has rejected a plan for the Tampa Bay Rays to play half their home games in Montreal, according to reports in the Tampa Bay Times and La Presse. As part of the plan, which has been gestating for years, open-air stadia would have been built in both Montreal and Tampa Bay. The suggestion that governments might provide partial financing for the Montreal stadium was rebuffed by a bevy of provincial and municipal politicians in December. Rays owner Stuart Sternberg is due to address the media on Thursday afternoon. This story will be updated.

Coco Crisp, OF. Besides having an all-time name, Crisp had a better career than you might remember. He’s one of only 41 players to finish his career with at least 130 homers and 300 stolen bases, and he had six seasons with a bWAR or 3.0 or higher. Not a Hall of Famer, but worthy of a spot on the ballot.

J.J. Hardy, SS. If you’re building a team, you’d want a shortstop with a little pop in his bat — Hardy had five seasons with at least 22 homers — and who is a defensive asset, and Hardy won three Gold Glove awards.

Mike Napoli, 1B/DH. The dude could hit a baseball a long way. Napoli had eight seasons with at least 20 homers and finished with 267 in his career, plus eight more in the postseason.

R.A. Dickey, SP. His story is pretty amazing. Dickey turned to the knuckleball and revived his career; he made more than 15 starts for the first time in his Age 35 season, and from that year through the end of his career he threw 1,631 innings with a 3.66 ERA, and he won the 2012 NL Cy Young award.

Potentially on the ballot

Bronson Arroyo, a mainstay in the Reds rotation for nine years — at least 32 starts in eight of them — absolutely deserves a spot on the ballot. When Aaron Hill was good, he was very good — three seasons of a 5-plus bWAR, three seasons with at least 26 homers is outstanding for a second baseman — but he fought injuries much of his career and finished with a 24.4 bWAR. Ubaldo Jimenez’s ERA from 2006 to 2010, playing for Colorado, was 3.52. His ERA from 2011 to 2017 was 4.85. A spot is not certain.

A solid outfield starter for the Dodgers for a decade, Andre Ethier was done as starter by his Age 34 season. Beloved catcher Carlos Ruiz was huge part of the success of those outstanding Phillies teams from 2007 to 2011. Again, closers: Huston Street had 11 consecutive seasons with at least 16 saves, including five with at least 33.

412 Empty ballot issued: no winner in presidential election in Italy - even after third-time ballot .
Italy is waiting for a successful choice of the new head of state. Even with the third vote, no candidate reached a two-third majority. © Photo: Imago Images / Nurphoto / Andrea Ronchini The Italian Parliament Building also the third round of the election of a new president in Italy has not brought a result. Once again, no candidate reached the necessary two-thirds majority.

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