Sports: Jack Todd: Hockey Canada's so-called leaders need to resign

Timeline: Hockey Canada's handling of 2018 sexual assault allegation

  Timeline: Hockey Canada's handling of 2018 sexual assault allegation A timeline of Hockey Canada's response to an alleged sexual assault involving eight players in London, Ont., in 2018: Jan. 5, 2018 — Canada's world junior hockey team defeats Sweden in the gold-medal final in Buffalo, N.Y. June 18, 2018 — Hockey Canada Foundation Gala & Golf event begins in London. June 19, 2018 — A woman's stepfather informs Hockey Canada she alleges she was sexually assaulted by eight players, including members of the world junior team, while intoxicated the previous night following the event. Hockey Canada says it spoke with its insurance provider and then informed London police, which opened an investigation.

Witnesses Scott Smith, Hockey Canada President and Chief Operating Officer, left, and Hockey Canada Chief Financial Officer Brian Cairo, appear at the standing committee on Canadian Heritage in Ottawa on Wednesday, July 27, 2022, looking into how Hockey Canada handled allegations of sexual assault and a subsequent lawsuit. © Provided by The Gazette Witnesses Scott Smith, Hockey Canada President and Chief Operating Officer, left, and Hockey Canada Chief Financial Officer Brian Cairo, appear at the standing committee on Canadian Heritage in Ottawa on Wednesday, July 27, 2022, looking into how Hockey Canada handled allegations of sexual assault and a subsequent lawsuit.

It was not a good sign.

One day before parliamentary hearings into the burgeoning Hockey Canada scandal were to recommence, the organization’s embattled executives put out an Action Plan to “shatter the code of silence and eliminate toxic behaviour in and around Canada’s game.”

Players who don't participate in Hockey Canada sexual assault investigation will be banned: investigator

  Players who don't participate in Hockey Canada sexual assault investigation will be banned: investigator A third party investigator hired by Hockey Canada to look into an alleged group sexual assault said players who don't participate in her investigation will be banned from Hockey Canada for life, and that many players she hasn't interviewed are concerned that some politicians and Hockey Canada have pre-judged them guilty.Danielle Robitaille, a partner at law firm Henein Hutchison LLP, told the House of Commons standing committee on Canadian Heritage that Hockey Canada has advised her that players who don't take part in her reopened investigation will be banned from Hockey Canada and will be named publicly.

It was a blatant and desperate attempt to hang on to their cushy jobs on the part of executives who have fostered that code of silence and that toxic behaviour for a quarter-century or more, up to and including the alleged 2018 sexual assault in a London hotel room that would eventually tear the scab off a wound that has been festering far too long.

As the hearings soon made clear, the Action Plan won’t wash. Too late, wrong people. As hockey writer Ken Campbell pointed out, Hockey Canada’s first reaction upon learning that a young woman had allegedly been assaulted by eight players was not to call the police.

These same executives, we also learned, pay themselves bonuses each time Canadian hockey teams win a tournament — even though they’re almost always favoured to win. This would include the Olympic gold medal women’s team, inadvertently creating bonuses for the very people who have so conspicuously failed the women of this country.

Sex assault survivors after Hockey Canada executives’ testimony: ‘Get out of the way now’

  Sex assault survivors after Hockey Canada executives’ testimony: ‘Get out of the way now’ Alongside calls for Hockey Canada executives to resign, former players who allege abuse are speaking out in reaction to committee testimony, calling for more change. "They're not focused necessarily on doing the right thing," Greg Gilhooly, an alleged survivor of disgraced Winnipeg minor hockey coach and convicted sex offender Graham James, told Global News in reference to Hockey Canada executives’ handling of the sex abuse allegations. Read more: Hockey Canada made nine settlements totalling $7.

As the principals in this scandal testified one after another, it became clear that nothing short of a very wide broom is going to begin to clean up this mess.

Obtuse, tone-deaf, awash in their own entitlement and power, the key players for Hockey Canada left an entire nation in need of a long shower. CEO Scott Smith and former CEO Tom Renney left the impression that they’re unable to fathom the depths of this scandal and the damage already done to our national game by the very people who were supposed to protect it.

We’re left wondering whether there’s a way to pry hockey from the jaws of Hockey Canada on behalf of the hundreds of thousands of young people in Canada who simply want to play the game. Yet Smith, whose capacity for self-deception is as bottomless as the scandal itself, still clings to power.

What happened in London was no accident. It has happened before. Again and again. Hockey Canada even had a fund that paid almost $9 million in what is effectively hush money to 21 victims — a revelation that offended the prime minister himself.

This Former Child Star Quit Acting Because She Was 'Embarrassed' by Her Roles

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No. The only “action plan” Canadians want to hear at this point is the one that begins “I tender my resignation from Hockey Canada, effective immediately.”

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A Tale of Two Teams

They occupy roughly the same position, flanking the colossus that is the CH, fighting for attention from fans who love nothing so much as to spend the month of July arguing over whether the Canadiens should give up the farm for the dubious commodity known as Pierre-Luc Dubois .

They are the Montreal Alouettes and the Club de Foot Montréal (awkwardly named but deft on the soccer pitch) and they are headed in opposite directions.

While the Alouettes plummet toward the bottom under Danny Maciocia following the inexcusable dismissals of head coach Khari Jone s and defensive coordinator Barron Miles, our MLS franchise is making steady headway under the guidance of Wilfried Nancy, the tall Frenchman who has some of the sideline presence that Felipe Alou once brought to the Expos dugout.

Q&A with minister of sport Pascale St-Onge: ‘I feel a responsibility to change things’

  Q&A with minister of sport Pascale St-Onge: ‘I feel a responsibility to change things’ In a sitdown interview with Sportsnet’s Iain MacIntyre, minister of sport Pascale St-Onge discussed her thoughts on what Hockey Canada needs to change, what she plans on doing to make sports federations more accountable and what’s next. Here is the edited transcript of that conversation. Sportsnet: Minister of Sport Pascale St-Onge, thank you for joining us today and giving us some of your very valuable time. What have the last few months been like for you, as a new cabinet minister dealing with a crisis in sports in Canada? St-Onge: Well, one of the reasons why I got involved in politics is to be an agent of change.

Against the reigning MLS Cup champions New York City FC Saturday, Nancy’s team had the best of the chances and likely would have won it at Stade Saputo had Mason Toye not shanked a point-blank chance in the 55th minute.

Much as we hate nil-nil draws, this one confirmed the Montreal club’s status as a bona fide contender and was a fitting salute to former player and assistant coach Jason Di Tullio , who died of cancer Friday.

 Hamilton Tiger Cats linebacker Jovan Santos-Knox (45) celebrates his tackle on Montreal Alouettes running back Jeshrun Antwi (20) during first half CFL football game action in Hamilton July 28, 2022. © Provided by The Gazette Hamilton Tiger Cats linebacker Jovan Santos-Knox (45) celebrates his tackle on Montreal Alouettes running back Jeshrun Antwi (20) during first half CFL football game action in Hamilton July 28, 2022.

The Als, meanwhile, showed little or nothing Thursday against the Tiger-Cats, despite a late comeback sparked by a Hamilton turnover. They can blame medical interference on a late concussion ruling that kept quarterback Trevor Harris from making the final play, but they were very fortunate to be in it at all.

Owner Gary Stern, in one of his quirkily punctuated Twitter pronouncements after the Hamilton game, appeared to be doubting Maciocia’s leadership — but he followed that with another statement fiercely defending Maciocia.

Meanwhile, nine years after he played his last game at quarterback, offensive coordinator Anthony Calvillo has still not been replaced at the position he dominated. With William Stanback injured, the list of marquee offensive players is pretty much down to receiver Eugene Lewis.

Maciocia is in far over his head, but he has succeeded in confirming one of Todd’s Rules for Team Owners: What if the GM comes to you wanting to fire the coach and take over behind the bench himself?

Fire the GM.

Heroes: Chloe Kelly, Bill Russell, Kim Clavel , Summer McIntosh, Maggie Mac Neil, Kelsey Mitchell, Hannah Kaminski, Annemiek Van Vleuten, Aaron Judge &&&& last but not least, Wilfried Nancy and CF Montreal.

Zeroes: Scott Smith, Tom Renney, Bob Nicholson, Hockey Canada, Danny Maciocia, Greg Norman, Bubba Watson, Claude Brochu, David Samson &&&& last but not least, Jeffrey Loria.

Now and forever.

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Calls for accountability and change within Canadian hockey mount in the wake of national scandal .
Calls for accountability and change with in Canadian hockey are growing in the wake of the national organization's alleged sexual abuse scandal — but there is also hope it will be the catalyst to finally change the sport's toxic culture."I'm not sure it [change] can happen without a change in leadership," said Daryl Fowler, president of Hockey Winnipeg, which represents about 10,000 players.

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