Health & Fitness: We should support trans men who wish to chest-feed their babies, Royal college advises

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A royal college has advised in new draft guidelines that transgender men should be supported if they decide to chest-feed their babies. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) says trans men should be asked about their preferred method of feeding prior to their baby being born, with adequate support then given.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says the guidelines 'aim to improve the care and experiences of transgender and gender-diverse individuals' © PA The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists says the guidelines 'aim to improve the care and experiences of transgender and gender-diverse individuals'

The document, which has been put out for review until September 6, covers care for trans and gender-diverse people through childbirth, contraception, fertility, gynaecological procedures and cancer treatment and care. The guidelines makes a series of recommendations to help improve care, including:

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  • Trans and gender-diverse people should be offered advice about fertility preservation when considering gender-affirming surgery or hormone therapies.
  • Trans men who conceive while taking masculinising-hormone therapy should stop taking the hormones “as soon as possible”, while those who are planning to conceive should stop their therapy for three months prior to conception.
  • Healthcare workers should be aware that trans and gender-diverse people can face barriers when accessing healthcare services and take steps to ensure “easy access to care without their gender being questioned or their confidentiality breached”.
  • People should always be addressed and referred to by their preferred title, name, pronouns and family relationships.

The document also states that “gender-diverse people should be offered health screening in accordance with national public health policies and clinical guidelines”. It follows the Government’s women’s health strategy which said that transgender men and non-binary people with female reproductive organs should always receive screening invites so they can access cervical and breast cancer screening.

Trans men should be supported to 'chestfeed' their babies, new guidance urges

  Trans men should be supported to 'chestfeed' their babies, new guidance urges Trans men should be supported to chestfeed their babies should they choose to do so, experts have said. © Associated Press New guidelines are on the table looking at ensuring inclusive provision for trans and gender diverse people in healthcare. Picture: Associated Press A new draft guideline from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) says trans men should be asked about their preferred manner of feeding before their baby is born and those who chose to chestfeed should be offered "chestfeeding support in the same manner as for cis-women".

RCOG president Dr Edward Morris said: “This is an important guideline which aims to improve the care and experiences of transgender and gender diverse individuals accessing obstetric and gynaecological services. Sadly, trans and gender diverse individuals say they often feel judged and misunderstood by the health service.

“This can act as a barrier for them when it comes to accessing vital care and we as healthcare professionals have a role to play in making them feel listened to and recognised. This draft guideline is our first attempt to ensure we are providing personalised care for all our patients. We welcome feedback on this draft to ensure the guideline is the best as it can be for clinicians and the trans and gender-diverse individuals who use our services.”

Commenting on the guidelines, Asha Kasliwal, president of The Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, added: “There are a number of reports detailing poor clinical outcomes as a result of failure to properly understand and evaluate gender diverse people’s healthcare needs. This draft guideline seeks to break down barriers and improve the experiences of trans and gender-diverse people accessing obstetric and gynaecological services.”

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