Health & Fitness: Heart disease: Study finds how you could reduce your risk by spending time outdoors

Conquer Any Terrain With Our Pick Of The Best Walking Boots

  Conquer Any Terrain With Our Pick Of The Best Walking Boots Do your soggy socks a favour. Pick up a pair of these tried and tested waterproof walking boots.

There are various layers when it comes to your risk of health conditions and heart disease is no different. However, a new study has found that getting more sun could boost your levels of a certain vitamin and reduce inflammation, which can consequently cut your risk of heart disease.

Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, the research suggests that getting enough vitamin D from the sunshine can help lower inflammation.

Although inflammation can be a normal part of your body's immune system as well as other processes, too much can boost your risk of developing chronic conditions like heart disease, according to Hopkins Medicine.

Heart attack warning: Sign on the ear that could predict the condition - ‘Frank's sign'

  Heart attack warning: Sign on the ear that could predict the condition - ‘Frank's sign' HEART attacks occur when the flow of blood to the heart suddenly stops. One of the most dangerous forms of heart disease, heart attacks can sometimes be predicted by signs in other parts of the body, including the ears.Dr Frank first observed the phenomenon when he noticed it in patients with chest pain and coronary artery blockages.

Looking at 294,970 subjects from the UK Biobank, the research team investigated the link between vitamin D and inflammation.

People who had higher levels of the sunshine vitamin were less likely to show signs of inflammation, which is considered a precursor of various conditions.

READ MORE: Dr Mosley shares the 15p snack that can lower 'bad' cholesterol by 23% - 'Delicious'Link

Heart disease: Getting vitamin D from sun could reduce risk - study. © GETTY Heart disease: Getting vitamin D from sun could reduce risk - study.

How can I get vitamin D from the sun?

While there are many different ways to boost your vitamin D levels, one of the easiest ways is to spend time outside in the sun.

The NHS explains that from about late March till the end of September, the majority of people in the UK should be able to make vitamin D from the sunlight.

Run to the beat: 10 best heart rate monitors for runners – chest-straps, watches and headphones

  Run to the beat: 10 best heart rate monitors for runners – chest-straps, watches and headphones The best HR-tracking straps, watches and headphone for staying in the zoneStrap on a heart rate tracker, whether round your chest, arm or in your ears, and you can unlock useful insights into your real-time performance, helping you train at the right effort for your goals. It can estimate your fitness levels, indicate potential peak performance, help with recovery recommendations and even spot your susceptibility to injury or incoming illness.

Your body is able to organically synthesise the vitamin just from spending time outdoors with bare skin, which landed the nutrient its nickname as the sunshine vitamin.

While most people are able to top up their levels during the spring and summer, the NHS recommends taking a vitamin D supplement during autumn and winter due to the lack of sunshine.

DON'T MISS How to live longer: The golden drink 'significantly' lowering cholesterol and blood sugarLink [INFORMER]Dr Mosley shares the 15p snack that can lower 'bad' cholesterol by 23% - 'Delicious'Link [INFORMER]Vitamin B12: The sign of low levels to spot in your feet when they're 'under a blanket'Link [INFORMER]

Adults need to get 10 micrograms of the sunshine vitamin on a daily basis.

Heart disease and vitamin D

Senior Dietitian Victoria Taylor from British Heart Foundation (BFH) also explained that there might be a link between heart disease and the vitamin.

The simple activity shown to reduce risk of heart problems - 'less than 5 minutes' needed

  The simple activity shown to reduce risk of heart problems - 'less than 5 minutes' needed HEART disease kills thousands of Britons each year but over time scientists are learning more about how to improve heart health using lifestyle changes.One of these changes could be to introduce resistance exercises to your routine, suggests one study.

She said: "It has also been suggested that low levels of vitamin D could be linked to chronic diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and heart and circulatory disease."

However, previous research on this topic wasn't as conclusive.

READ MORE: Vitamin B12: The sign of low levels to spot in your feet when they're 'under a blanket'Link

Adults need to get 10 micrograms of the sunshine vitamin on a daily basis. © GETTY Adults need to get 10 micrograms of the sunshine vitamin on a daily basis.

Taylor said: "A 2015 Scottish study, part funded by the BHF, showed that although having low levels of vitamin D is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the low vitamin D is a result of lifestyle factors that increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, rather than the cause of increased risk."

However, now researchers found the mechanisms between vitamin D and inflammation, which is considered to be a driver for heart disease.

Dr Ang Zhou, lead researcher, said: "Inflammation is your body's way of protecting your tissues if you've been injured or have an infection.

"High levels of C-reactive protein are generated by the liver in response to inflammation, so when your body is experiencing chronic inflammation, it also shows higher levels of C-reactive protein.

Dementia: How to reduce your risk of the brain disease

  Dementia: How to reduce your risk of the brain disease WHEN we think about dementia risk, often old age is thought about as the time when this becomes relevant. However, this is not the case. It is what someone does before they reach old age that defines their risk of developing the condition.However, as there are no new treatments or a cure, researchers are also looking into how dementia can be prevented through changes earlier on in life.

The sources of vitamin D. © Express.co.uk The sources of vitamin D.

"This study examined vitamin D and C-reactive proteins and found a one-way relationship between low levels of vitamin D and high levels of C-reactive protein, expressed as inflammation.

"Boosting vitamin D in people with deficiencies may reduce chronic inflammation, helping them to avoid a number of related diseases."

These findings could have major implications for medical experts. However, there's a need for more research to understand the role of vitamin D and health conditions further.

Another thing to remember is that while most people can get vitamin D from the sunshine, there are also people who might be unable to get enough this way.

The NHS warns that these groups might be at a risk of deficiency:

  • Those who are not often outdoors (for example, if they're frail or housebound)
  • Those who are in an institution like a care home
  • Those who usually wear clothes that cover up most of their skin when outdoors.
  • The good news is that there are also other sources of vitamin D like food and supplements.

How artificial intelligence can help treat heart attacks in women .
HEART attacks when the flow of blood to the brain suddenly stops. A potentially fatal cardiovascular event, a heart attack is normally caused by a blood clot which occurs after a build-up of risk factors. One of these risk factors is gender, and gender is the focus one study into how these cardiovascular events can be treated.The aim of the models is to influence treatment plans so that a second heart attack can be prevented. Primary author of the study Florian Wenzl said: ""The study shows that established risk models which guide current patient management are less accurate in females and favor the undertreatment of female patients.

See also