TOP News

Health & Fitness: The late Geraldine Fitzgerald suffered from the 'most common' form of dementia - signs

Citrus fruits could slash risk of brain decline by 23% - best types to eat

  Citrus fruits could slash risk of brain decline by 23% - best types to eat DIET IS one of the key pillars for maintaining overall physical health. A diet rich in vitamins and minerals can help reduce someone's risk of a range of ailments, including brain decline and associated diseases.It is this fruits which the study suggests could help reduce the risk of dementia by 23 percent. These conclusions were reached after study of over 13,000 participants in a Japanese study.

At the height of her fame, Geraldine Fitzgerald featured in Wuthering Heights (1939), Dark Victory (1939) and, later, Easy Money (1983). The Oscar-nominated performer was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, on November 24, 1913. First appearing in her hometown's Gate Theatre, she moved to New York City in 1938 to delight audiences on Broadway.

Signed by a Warner Bros talent scout, Geraldine read lines for productions such as Shining Victory (1941) and The Gay Sisters (1942) - among many more.

In later life, the Dublin redhead suffered from Alzheimer's disease for more than a decade before her death on July 17, 2005 in Upper East Side, New York.

Beer may ward off dementia staggering study finds - but it matters how much you drink

  Beer may ward off dementia staggering study finds - but it matters how much you drink The study, which involved 25,000 participants, suggests moderate beer consumption confers some protection against brain decline.Australian researchers studied the drinking habits and dementia rates among 25,000 over-60s.

The leading charity, the Alzheimer's Society, points out that Alzheimer's disease is the "most common cause of dementia".

When a person has the disease, the connection between nerve cells in the brain gradually diminishes.

READ MORE: 'Poor hygiene' may be associated with three major cancers

Dementia: Physical symptoms of brain decline can be confused with Parkinson's disease

  Dementia: Physical symptoms of brain decline can be confused with Parkinson's disease The overlapping symptoms of Parkinson's and dementia can lead to confusion and a potential misdiagnosis.Lewy body dementia is a condition associated with abnormal deposits of a protein known as alpha-synuclein in the brain, these deposits affect chemicals in the brain which lead to problems with thinking, movement, and behaviour.

Geraldine Fitzgerald suffered from dementia © Getty Geraldine Fitzgerald suffered from dementia

"This is because proteins build up and form abnormal structures called 'plaques' and 'tangles'," the charity explains.

Interfering with the way brain cells communicate to each other, brain cells eventually die.

As a result, less brain cells equates to more difficulty with memory, for instance, or decision making.

With time, the disease will affect more and more brain cells, leading to more symptoms.

The way you handle daily tasks could 'predict dementia years before diagnosis' - expert

  The way you handle daily tasks could 'predict dementia years before diagnosis' - expert An expert shares the key signs that could "predict" dementia diagnosis years in advance.While there's no magical device that can tell you if and when you'll develop dementia, there are some signs that could ring alarm bells years before you start experiencing the key symptoms.

DON'T MISS: Woman who drank energy drinks daily hospitalised with liver injuryLink [INFORMER] Washing sheets infrequently could raise your risk of 'deadly' conditionsLink [INFORMER] 'Subtle indications' of dementia may show up 18 years before diagnosisLink [INSIGHT]

"There are some common symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, but no one's experience will be exactly the same as anyone else's," the charity adds.

In the beginning, memory issues tend to be limited to difficulties with recalling recent events and learning new information.

Over time, however, memory problems will begin to affect day-to-day life, such as forgetting a friend's name, or struggling to find the right word in conversation.

Issues with thinking, reasoning, language, and perception will develop, which can become challenging to live with.

READ MORE: 'Poor hygiene' may be associated with three major cancers

Dementia: Six sleep disorders that appear in up to 50% of patients with ‘severe dementia'

  Dementia: Six sleep disorders that appear in up to 50% of patients with ‘severe dementia' Evidence has been unclear on whether poor sleep is a cause or an early symptom of cognitive decline.According to the Mayo Clinic, "sleep disturbances may affect up to 25% of people with mild to moderate dementia and 50% of people with severe dementia".

Geraldine Fitzgerald and John Garfield in Nobody Lives Forever © Getty Geraldine Fitzgerald and John Garfield in Nobody Lives Forever

"A person in the earlier stages of Alzheimer's will often have changes in their mood," the Alzheimer's Society says.

"They may become anxious, depressed or more easily annoyed. Many people lose interest in talking to people, or in activities and hobbies."

In the later stages of the brain disease, the person affected might develop delusions, which is when he/she believes things that simply are not true.

For instance, the person affected could begin to believe that a loved one is stealing from him/her.

Merle Oberon and Geraldine Fitzgerald in Wuthering Heights © Getty Merle Oberon and Geraldine Fitzgerald in Wuthering Heights

On average, people with Alzheimer's disease live for eight to 10 years after the first onset of symptoms.

"However, this varies a lot, depending especially on how old the person was when they first developed Alzheimer's," the charity clarifies.

Right now, there are more than 520,000 people in the UK with Alzheimer's disease.

Before the disease affected her, Geraldine Fitzgerald starred in the film OSS, which is showcasing on Monday, December 5 on Film4 at 4.35pm.

Dementia crisis: NHS ‘system failings’ leave tens of thousands without ongoing care available to them .
Leading charities are calling on the Government to 'urgently' publish its 10-year dementia strategy , which was announced in May but is yet to materialise. Around 900,000 people have dementia in the UK with the number expected to rise to 1.6 million by 2050. To be eligible for CHC, patients are assessed by a team of healthcare professionals who look at all their care needs and relate them to what help is needed, how complex the needs are, how intense the needs can be and how unpredictable they are, including any risks to their health if the right care is not provided at the right time.

See also