Motorcycles: How To Permanently Repair A Flat Tubeless Motorcycle Tire

How to Find Exact Replacements for Your Car's Worn-Out Tires

  How to Find Exact Replacements for Your Car's Worn-Out Tires You’ve spent a few years and thousands of miles with your car, and you’ve finally approached that big moment: The original tires that came on your car are now worn out. The first questions that c ome to mind are, “What should I buy?" and "Do I stick with the same tires, or try a different model or brand?” Research Research New Used New & Used Make (e.g. Mazda) Model (e.g. CX-5) Research by Consumer Reports shows most car owners buy—or attempt to buy—the same tire that came on their vehicle, either solely for convenience, or to preserve or get back that new-car feel.

  How To Permanently Repair A Flat Tubeless Motorcycle Tire © Motorcyclist

If a new tire isn't in the budget, a plug/patch repair performed from the inside of the tire is the next best thing.

Not all tire manufacturers condone plugging a tire, but those that do insist on a plug/patch repair performed from the inside of the tire. It’s the only form of puncture repair that’s considered permanent because it fully fills the wound and seals the tire from the inside. Use only patch kits sized for motorcycle tires, like this Stop & Go system. Now, here’s how to use it.

Mark the puncture, remove the offending item, and then dismount the tire. Yes, you have to remove the tire! Be aware that punctures on the edge of the tread or in the sidewall cannot be repaired. The same goes for holes larger than 7mm in diameter.© Motorcyclist Mark the puncture, remove the offending item, and then dismount the tire. Yes, you have to remove the tire! Be aware that punctures on the edge of the tread or in the sidewall cannot be repaired. The same goes for holes larger than 7mm in diameter.

Step 1

Essential car insurance for auto body repairs

  Essential car insurance for auto body repairs Essential car insurance for auto body repairsIf you've dented your bumper, developed deep paint scratches or otherwise damaged your car, you may be surprised to discover that the cost to repair auto body mishaps can range between $50 to $1,500, and more.

Mark the puncture, remove the offending item, and then dismount the tire. Yes, you have to remove the tire! Be aware that punctures on the edge of the tread or in the sidewall cannot be repaired. The same goes for holes larger than 7mm in diameter.

Carefully inspect the tread and inner liner for damage, which most often occurs from being run underinflated. Any bubbling or signs of delamination are cause for tire replacement. This inspection is the critical part of the repair that can only performed with the tire removed.© Motorcyclist Carefully inspect the tread and inner liner for damage, which most often occurs from being run underinflated. Any bubbling or signs of delamination are cause for tire replacement. This inspection is the critical part of the repair that can only performed with the tire removed.

Step 2

Carefully inspect the tread and inner liner for damage, which most often occurs from being run underinflated. Any bubbling or signs of delamination are cause for tire replacement. This inspection is the critical part of the repair that can only performed with the tire removed.

A Four-Seat Ural Motorcycle Is Cooler Than Your Minivan

  A Four-Seat Ural Motorcycle Is Cooler Than Your Minivan ​Don't ever give up the adventure. ​Yes, some ball-and-chain significant other forces your hand! The rugrats have finally neutered your masculinity! It's time to begin the long, slow oblivion into death and Dockers Relaxed-Fit khakis-say goodbye to all that two-wheeled adventure! It's time to succumb to a Raymond Carver short story!

Prepare the repair site by buffing the inner liner of the tire to expose fresh rubber. Buff an area slightly larger than the patch portion of your plug/patch. Then ream the hole to clear it of debris.© Motorcyclist Prepare the repair site by buffing the inner liner of the tire to expose fresh rubber. Buff an area slightly larger than the patch portion of your plug/patch. Then ream the hole to clear it of debris.

Step 3

Prepare the repair site by buffing the inner liner of the tire to expose fresh rubber. Buff an area slightly larger than the patch portion of your plug/patch. Then ream the hole to clear it of debris.

Apply rubber cement to the repair site and allow it to dry for several minutes. Remove the covering from the patch head and push the quill through the hole from the inside. Pull it flush with the inner liner.© Motorcyclist Apply rubber cement to the repair site and allow it to dry for several minutes. Remove the covering from the patch head and push the quill through the hole from the inside. Pull it flush with the inner liner.

Step 4

Apply rubber cement to the repair site and allow it to dry for several minutes. Remove the covering from the patch head and push the quill through the hole from the inside. Pull it flush with the inner liner.

Cut the quill flush with the tread and then carefully press the patch into place. Use your thumbs to force air out from under the patch by pressing from the center of the patch toward the perimeter.© Motorcyclist Cut the quill flush with the tread and then carefully press the patch into place. Use your thumbs to force air out from under the patch by pressing from the center of the patch toward the perimeter.

Step 5

Motorcycle gear—it’s between you and the road

  Motorcycle gear—it’s between you and the road Motorcycle gear—it’s between you and the roadLive to Ride: My New Life on the Road

Cut the quill flush with the tread and then carefully press the patch into place. Use your thumbs to force air out from under the patch by pressing from the center of the patch toward the perimeter.

Reinstall the tire and inflate it to the recommended pressure. Inspect the repair for air-tightness with soapy water or saliva. Recheck the repair after the first few miles of riding, and keep an eye on the repair throughout the life of the tire.© Motorcyclist Reinstall the tire and inflate it to the recommended pressure. Inspect the repair for air-tightness with soapy water or saliva. Recheck the repair after the first few miles of riding, and keep an eye on the repair throughout the life of the tire.

Step 6

Reinstall the tire and inflate it to the recommended pressure. Inspect the repair for air-tightness with soapy water or saliva. Recheck the repair after the first few miles of riding, and keep an eye on the repair throughout the life of the tire.

Bad Craigslist Motorcycle Deals and How To Avoid Them .
Bad Craigslist Motorcycle Deals and How To Avoid ThemIt was only recently that I was guiding a friend of mine through his first motorcycle purchase. He wasn’t working with a lot of money, and he made it clear to me that financing a new or used bike would unfortunately be out of the question. With that in mind, I turned him onto the wonders of craigslist, but after a short while browsing the classifieds, his blank stare solidified my perception that he had only become more perplexed. “How do I know what a good price is...for anything?” I pointed out a listing that I had noticed as he scrolled down the page.

See also