Ownership: Man Hacks His Tesla To Pull Out of the Garage Like Magic

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Man Hacks His Tesla To Pull Out of the Garage Like Magic © Provided by Popular Mechanics Man Hacks His Tesla To Pull Out of the Garage Like Magic

While Tesla's self-driving, lane-changing autopilot that functions out on the open road might be its flashiest smart feature, there's plenty of room for that tech to expand to less exciting but equally useful applications. Take this hacked Tesla, for instance, which can emerge from the garage of its own accord with nothing more than a simple voice command.

The hack, put together by Jason Goecke, basically just extends the power of Amazon's voice-controlled speaker the Echo so that Alexa-the AI that lives inside-can exert some control over Goecke's Tesla Model S and force it to roll outside all on its own. It's a party trick that makes run-of-the-mill remote start look like child's play.

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Tesla's API isn't published, so the solution took a bit of hacking to make work, but while it might be a little involved for such a simple trick, the high-level step-by-step seems pretty straightforward. As Goecke describes in a post on Teslarati:

The tech behind this is all based in the cloud. I am using the Amazon Echo's Alex Skill Kit to trigger on a keyword ('ask KITT') and send the resulting event to AWS Lambda. Lambda then executes my code (I built my Lambda function with Apex, which I highly recommend for anyone working with Lambda) where I use the Tesla Golang library I recently published. The Golang code on Lambda then calls the unofficial Tesla API which in turns triggers the car to take action. In this case, to open the garage door via Homelink and drive on out using the Summon capability.

Obviously this is more party trick than practical application. After all, there's no real way to authenticate the command and keeping anyone who has heard the command before from just using it for fun. Still, it's a neat little window into what smart home technology and increasingly smart cars will make possible in the future, for us and for anyone else who might be able to get into the network.

Source: Teslarati via Reddit

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