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Home & Garden: What Is Bone Meal and How Can I Use It in My Garden?

The Many Mighty Benefits of Bone Broth, From Better Sleep to Tighter Skin

  The Many Mighty Benefits of Bone Broth, From Better Sleep to Tighter Skin It's relatively simple to make at home.Bone broth (or bone stock) is a savory liquid made by simmering animal bones and connective tissues in water for six to 24 hours. Its flavor and health benefits are the result of this slow simmer. Over a period of several hours, the nutrients and proteins in the bones and connective tissue transfer to the water, creating a tasty, nutrient-dense broth. Often seasoned with herbs and veggie scraps, bone broth can be used as a base for soups or consumed on its own.

what is bone meal - raking the soil amendment into a garden © Provided by Bob Vila what is bone meal - raking the soil amendment into a garden Photo: istockphoto.com

The #1 Supplement To Help Prevent Osteoporosis Later in Life, New Study Finds

  The #1 Supplement To Help Prevent Osteoporosis Later in Life, New Study Finds New research suggests that taking calcium supplements at a younger age may help prevent osteoporosis when you're older.The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion also notes that osteoporosis is a disease that affects around 10 million people in the United States who are 50 years old or older. Beyond that, over 43 million people are at risk of osteoporosis due to low bone mass. While that might be cause for concern, a report has found that taking calcium supplements when you're younger may help to prevent osteoporosis when you are older.

Bone meal is sometimes sold as a livestock feed additive or a supplement for people. However, in the gardening world, it’s most often used as the phosphorus-contributing element in organic fertilizers.

Bone meal also may be marketed on its own as a plant food, touted to encourage rapid root growth in spring-flowering bulbs. Unfortunately, due to its less-than-beneficial effect on mycorrhizal fungi, the disadvantages of bone meal fertilizer may outweigh the advantages. Before we get to that, though, just what is bone meal?

Copycat Olive Garden Breadstick Recipe

  Copycat Olive Garden Breadstick Recipe This Copycat Olive Garden Breadstick Recipe lets you easily make the best part of an Olive Garden meal at home! I'm a big bread lover and when I visit Olive Garden my very favorite things to eat are the salad and the BREADSTICKS! They are sooooo yummy. If you're also a fan of those yummyContinue Reading © Provided by Thrifty Jinxy Disclosure Affiliate

What Is Bone Meal?

Organic bone meal simply is the ground bones of livestock or, in fish bone meal, fish. Generally, those bones will have been cleaned of fat and steamed before being ground. This process can remove trace elements such as magnesium and zinc originally present in bone meal, leaving mostly phosphorus and calcium, as well as some nitrogen.

Reasons to Use Bone Meal in the Garden

Whether bone meal for plants is beneficial depends on whether your soil really needs it. Some plants show signs that they need the phosphorus or calcium that bone meal provides, but conducting a soil test is always the surest way to know.

Bone meal supplies phosphorus to promote root growth and flowering.

what is bone meal side view of soil with roots growing deep © Provided by Bob Vila what is bone meal side view of soil with roots growing deep Photo: istockphoto.com

Olive Garden Alfredo Sauce

  Olive Garden Alfredo Sauce Make the creamiest and most full of flavor Alfredo sauce just like the Olive Garden does. The post Olive Garden Alfredo Sauce appeared first on CopyKat Recipes.

Phosphorus, the middle number in garden fertilizer ratios, has long been considered essential for promoting both root growth and flowering in plants. So, bone meal for roses may be a good idea if bushes exhibit the American Rose Society’s list of phosphorus deficiency symptoms: “Older foliage drops without turning yellow. Leaves are dull gray-green in color. Buds slow to develop; leaf edges of older leaves may cup down.” In other plants, look for unnaturally dark older leaves tinged with violet and unnaturally small new leaves.

However, except for some depleted agricultural fields, most land in the U.S. is not deficient in phosphorus. Adding more may simply contribute to polluting runoff. Therefore, you’ll want to test your soil first to make sure that it really is low in phosphorus and to determine its pH. Highly alkaline or highly acidic soils often bind phosphorus rather than making use of it.

13 Foods To Eat After Breaking A Bone To Help With Healing

  13 Foods To Eat After Breaking A Bone To Help With Healing Breaking a bone is no fun. But did you know there are foods you can eat to help your bones heal?Many people experience broken bones during their lifetime. Statistics show that 50% of all Americans will break a bone by the age of 65 (per WebMD). For those with weaker bones due to osteoporosis, there is an increased risk of fractures, including bones in the hips, forearms, and wrists, explains the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Although some broken bones are obvious, minor fractures may not be as apparent. Some symptoms of bone fractures include pain, swelling, tenderness, bruising, and being unable to move as usual (via the Cleveland Clinic).

Bone meal supplies calcium for strong plant cells.

Bone meal for tomatoes sometimes is recommended to gardeners whose plants have produced fruits with blossom end rot attributed to calcium deficiency. That deficiency prevents the tomato fruits’ cell walls from developing properly, causing sunken dark spots on their undersides. Bone meal might help in cases where the rot actually is due to a lack of calcium in the soil.

In many cases, however, the problem lies instead with the plants not taking up available calcium properly due to overwatering or underwatering. Again, a soil test should help determine whether plants actually need more calcium or just a more consistent watering schedule. Other signs of calcium deficiency include crinkled leaves with unnaturally dark veins accompanied by chlorosis (yellowing between veins), brown spots on leaf edges, and shriveling plant tips.

RELATED: Plant Food vs. Fertilizer: What's the Difference?

Reasons Not to Use Bone Meal in the Garden

Even organic fertilizers can do more harm than good if they aren’t actually necessary. So protect the environment and your own budget by avoiding the overfeeding of garden beds, even with bone meal.

Southwest Sheet Pan Meal

  Southwest Sheet Pan Meal This colorful southwest sheet pan meal is a healthy, easy, and tasty dish to add to your meal rotation. It is a healthy and delicious weeknight meal, that makes great leftovers! One-pan meals are my go-to when I don’t know what to make for dinner, and this southwest sheet pan meal is my all-time favorite. It is colorful, delicious, easy to make, and so versatile. I can meal prep this and eat it a different way all week. Southwest sheet pan meal is wonderfully spiced and made with colorful veggies. It can be a taco filling, nourishing bowl, salad topper, or even add an egg or top for breakfast.

Too much phosphorus suppresses plants’ own natural phosphorus-gathering propensities.

According to Linda Chalker-Scott, an extension horticulturist at Washington State University, plants in low-phosphorus ground make acids that interact with mycorrhizal fungi to naturally draw phosphorus from the soil. “If phosphorus levels are too high, however, the roots do not exude the organic acids and mycorrhizal connections do not form,” she writes. “This forces the plant to put more resources into root growth to compensate for the lack of mycorrhizae. So in a sense phosphorus will increase root growth—but at an added cost to the plant.”

She goes on to emphasize, “Phosphorus, from bone meal or other sources, does not ‘stimulate’ plant growth; it is only a mineral, not a plant growth regulator.”

Bone meal attracts pets and pests.

what is bone meal racoon in garden near flowers © Provided by Bob Vila what is bone meal racoon in garden near flowers Photo: istockphoto.com

Bone Spurs Explained: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

  Bone Spurs Explained: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments Bone spurs are common, especially among older adults, and many cause no pain or problems. If you have one, here's what you need to know.According to the Cleveland Clinic, bone spurs are mostly seen in adults older than 60 years, but they can be found in younger people as well. Bone spurs can be formed on any bone, typically close to a joint. However, most bone spurs are found on bones of the spine, shoulder, fingers and other parts of the hand, hip, knee, heel, big toe, ankle, and other parts of the foot.

The odor of bones naturally will attract a variety of animals, including dogs, raccoons, and skunks. Those animals may then dig up your bulbs or young plants in their attempts to get at the meal.

Although bone meal isn’t usually considered toxic, the University of Rochester Medical Center warns that it is “high in lead” and “may also have high mercury levels.” So you don’t want your dog or your neighbor’s dog attempting to eat it. If you live in an area with a high population of pets or wildlife pests, it’s a good idea to choose an alternative organic phosphorus source such as colloidal soft rock phosphate.

Super Specific Memes About How Much People Love Slapping Bags

  Super Specific Memes About How Much People Love Slapping Bags If there's one thing you gotta do when you visit the grocery store or Home Depot, it's slapping those large bags lying around in the bulk section. It's just a rule, you have to do it. Slapping bags is a pretty universal compulsion. Back at the fish market in Cape Cod, we would do it with the massive bags of diver scallops, and sometimes I even find myself slapping bags of kitty litter. The urge to "slap the bag" even works for the bags of wine we guzzle as broke b*tches just trying to have a little fun. It's only natural that the ubiquity of these compulsions would eventually get the relatable meme treatment.

When and How to Apply Bone Meal Fertilizer

According to the organic fertilizer company Espoma, you should apply bone meal at the time you set out your plants or bulbs “at a rate of 10 pounds per 100 square feet, raking it well into the soil.” In subsequent years, you can use it once in spring and once again in autumn. For shrubs and trees, give 1 pound each to smaller specimens, 2 pounds each to larger ones. For potted plants, mix in no more than a heaping tablespoon per pot.

However, as was previously mentioned, you should apply phosphorus fertilizers only to soils that show a deficiency of the mineral and cease applying them once that deficiency has been corrected.

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Plants That Benefit From Bone Meal Fertilizer

what is bone meal tulips and daffodils in garden © Provided by Bob Vila what is bone meal tulips and daffodils in garden Photo: istockphoto.com

Below is a list of plants for which bone meal traditionally has been recommended. Keep in mind, however, that phosphorus fertilizers can be harmful to a few phosphorus-sensitive species—mostly Australian varieties—such as banksias, grevilleas, and hakeas, as well as proteas. If you plan to grow any of these plants, check to determine whether they are among the sensitive types before you attempt to fertilize them.

Traditionally, bone meal has been recommended when planting or feeding the following plants. Gardeners may add it if the soil is deficient in phosphorus:

  • Crocus
  • Daffodil
  • Hyacinth
  • Rose
  • Tomato
  • Tulip

FAQs About Bone Meal for Plants

If you prefer just the bare bones about bone meal, consult the questions and answers below. If you would prefer a little more meat on those bones, you may want to peruse the article above too.

Q. Can bone meal be used on all plants?

No, it can’t. Avoid applying bone meal to plants that are especially sensitive to phosphorus, such as plants in the genera Protea, Banksia, and Grevillea.

Q. How do I tell if my plants need more phosphorus?

Signs of phosphorus deficiency include unnaturally dark older leaves sometimes tinged with blue or violet and unnaturally small new leaves.

Q. Is bone meal fertilizer toxic?

Although bone meal generally isn’t considered toxic, it reportedly contains high levels of lead and possibly of mercury.

Q. Can bone meal burn plants?

No, bone meal doesn’t burn plants in the way high-nitrogen fertilizers sometimes do.

Q. Will bone meal pollute water sources?

Yes, excessive amounts of phosphorus can cause polluting runoff. Avoid using phosphorus fertilizers in your garden unless they are necessary.

Q. Can bone meal be used in hydroponics?

Yes, liquid bone meal is often used to provide phosphorus to plants grown hydroponically.

RELATED: Give Your Garden a Boost With This Guide to Soil Amendments

Super Specific Memes About How Much People Love Slapping Bags .
If there's one thing you gotta do when you visit the grocery store or Home Depot, it's slapping those large bags lying around in the bulk section. It's just a rule, you have to do it. Slapping bags is a pretty universal compulsion. Back at the fish market in Cape Cod, we would do it with the massive bags of diver scallops, and sometimes I even find myself slapping bags of kitty litter. The urge to "slap the bag" even works for the bags of wine we guzzle as broke b*tches just trying to have a little fun. It's only natural that the ubiquity of these compulsions would eventually get the relatable meme treatment.

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