Crime: Police still searching for 'person of interest' in Brooklyn subway shooting: What we know

Brooklyn subway shooting is not being investigated as terrorism 'at this time.' Here's why.

  Brooklyn subway shooting is not being investigated as terrorism 'at this time.' Here's why. The Brooklyn subway attack renews questions about why crimes like mass shootings aren't immediately categorized as terrorism.But New York officials on Tuesday said they weren't investigating the shooting as terrorism "at this time," renewing questions about why crimes like mass shootings aren't always or immediately categorized as terrorism and how legal definitions don't completely capture the way crimes are experienced by communities.

NEW YORK — Police were still searching Wednesday for a "person of interest" they say left a key to a U-Haul van at the scene of a chaotic shooting attack in a Brooklyn subway during morning rush hour that left dozens injured.

Officials with the New York City Police Department identified Frank James, 62, but stopped short of saying the man was a suspect in the shooting Tuesday morning.

Around two dozen people were injured, but none fatally, in the shooting on a Manhattan-bound train arriving at a Sunset Park subway station, said Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell on Tuesday.

Person of interest identified in Brooklyn subway train attack that injured about 2 dozen people

  Person of interest identified in Brooklyn subway train attack that injured about 2 dozen people Police identified Frank James, 62, with addresses in Wisconsin and Philadelphia, as a person of interest in Tuesday's chaotic New York City shooting.But authorities stopped short of saying the man they identified, Frank James, 62, was considered a suspect. Police said he was not in custody as of Tuesday night and no charges were filed.

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The shooter donned a gas mask before setting off two smoke canisters and opening fire while still on the train, Sewell said. The gunman fired 33 times with a Glock 17 9mm semi-handgun, which was also found in the subway, said Chief of Detectives James Essig said. At least 10 people were shot and at least 19 others were taken to hospitals for injuries ranging from smoke inhalation to shrapnel wounds.

Police work at the scene of a subway shooting in Brooklyn April 12, 2022 where at least ten people were shot during the morning rush hour. © Seth Harrison, The Journal News-USA TODAY NETWORK Police work at the scene of a subway shooting in Brooklyn April 12, 2022 where at least ten people were shot during the morning rush hour.

MORE ON THE BROOKLYN SUBWAY SHOOTING: Person of interest identified in Brooklyn subway train attack that injured about 2 dozen people

Police focus on van renter in Brooklyn subway shooting probe

  Police focus on van renter in Brooklyn subway shooting probe NEW YORK (AP) — A gunman wearing a gas mask set off smoke grenades and fired a barrage of bullets inside a rush-hour subway train in Brooklyn, wounding at least 10 people Tuesday, authorities said. Police were trying to track down the renter of a van possibly connected to the violence. Chief of Detectives James Essig said investigators weren't sure whether the man, identified as Frank R. James, 62, had any link to the subway attack. AuthoritiesChief of Detectives James Essig said investigators weren't sure whether the man, identified as Frank R. James, 62, had any link to the subway attack.

HOW THE SHOOTING UNFOLDED: Photos, videos show chaos of Brooklyn subway attack

Police looking into YouTube videos, threats of violence appearing to be tied to person of interest

Two non-detonated smoke grenades, a hatchet, gasoline and the key to a U-Haul van were also found on the train, Essig said. Investigators believe James rented the van in Philadelphia and police found it later Tuesday in Brooklyn, Essig said.

Brooklyn subway attack shocks neighborhood, a hub for working-class immigrants: 'Nothing like this happens here'

  Brooklyn subway attack shocks neighborhood, a hub for working-class immigrants: 'Nothing like this happens here' Local, working-class residents in Sunset Park were left "in a state of shock" Tuesday following the Brooklyn subway shooting during rush hour.Moreno, 57, lived in the diverse Brooklyn neighborhood for 17 years before moving to Bensonhurst and said it had always been a quiet area until Tuesday, when multiple people were shot and several "undetonated devices" were found at the station.

Mayor Eric Adams said Wednesday morning on MSNBC that no additional information has come out connecting James to New York City. James has ties to both Wisconsin and Philadelphia, authorities said.

WHERE IS SUNSET PARK: Subway attack shocks Sunset Park, a hub for working-class immigrants: 'Nothing like this happens here'

Sewell also said police are investigating a number of social media posts appearing to come from James where he mentioned homelessness and Adams. The mayor's security detail would be tightened out of an "abundance of caution," she said.

A law enforcement official who was not authorized to comment publicly told USA TODAY authorities were reviewing several social media pages, including YouTube videos appearing to feature James discussing a variety of issues from Black rights and slavery to the recent mass shooting in Sacramento and the confirmation of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court.

The videos touch on themes of violence, systemic racism and Black superiority. One video posted the day before the attack, the man in the videos said he wanted to harm people. “I can say I wanted to kill people. I wanted to watch people die."

NYC subway shooting updates: Suspect in custody, faces terror charges

  NYC subway shooting updates: Suspect in custody, faces terror charges Frank James, 62, was wanted for the attempted murder of 10 people. "We got him," New York City Mayor Eric Adams announced at a Wednesday news conference.

Other videos police are reviewing include clips from New York's subway trains. In a February, a video mentioned the city's subway safety plan. The man says the plan “is doomed for failure” and refers to himself as a “victim” of the mayor’s mental health program. A January video — called “Dear Mr. Mayor” — is somewhat critical of Adams’ plan to end gun violence, which has become an early focus of the Democrat's first term in office.

IS IT TERRORISM? Brooklyn subway shooting is not being investigated as terrorism 'at this time.' Here's why.

Eric Adams: City will look into new technologies, including metal detectors, for subways

Adams said during an appearance on MSNBC on Wednesday morning the city was exploring all "legal" technologies to keep the subways safe and detect any potential weapons entering the system.

Asked about the possibility of adding metal detectors, Adams said it was a possibility but that the detectors would not be like the ones common at airports, rather less invasive technologies that riders may not even notice.

Adams said a safe and reliable subway system was essential for New York City. "It's the lifeblood of our city. It's the great equalizer," he said on MSNBC.

Cities around US ramp up subway police patrols, Brooklyn neighborhood on edge

The attack sparked fears in riders taking the nation's subway system. Police in other major U.S. cities increased their presence in public transit as a result.

Police search for motive in Brooklyn subway suspect's videos

  Police search for motive in Brooklyn subway suspect's videos NEW YORK (AP) — Frank James posted dozens of videos ranting about race, violence and his struggles with mental illness. One stands out for its relative calm: A silent shot of a packed New York City subway car in which he raises his finger to point out passengers, one by one. Even as police arrested James on Wednesday in the Brooklyn subway shooting that wounded 10 people, they were still searching for a motive from a flood of details about the 62-year-old Black man’s life. An erratic work history. Arrests for a string of mostly low-level crimes. A storage locker with more ammo.

The BART system around the San Francisco Bay Area, SEPTA in Philadelphia and Washington's Metro were among the major public transit systems adding police officers or on a high alert after the attack.

In Sunset Park, residents were shocked their working-class, predominately immigrant neighborhood became the center of a violent attack Tuesday.

"Violence on the subway isn't new to our area, but seeing so many people so terrified and so many people saying they saw people covered in blood, it's crazy," said Rogelio Miranda, a cashier at a supermarket near the Brooklyn subway stop.

“Nothing like this happens here,” said Rosario Moreno, who lived in Sunset Park for 17 years. “I feel lost and scared."

Sunset Park was once predominantly home to Scandinavian immigrants until people from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic began arriving before 1970, followed later by Mexicans and more Central Americans.

Chinese immigrants looking to settle and start businesses outside of the city's crowded Chinatown began settling in the area during the late 1980s. They often told newcomers from China taking the trains from Manhattan to get out at the "blue sky stop," a reference to Sunset Park, where the subway lines emerged from tunnels into the open air.

Contributing: Kevin McCoy, Gabriela Miranda, Swapna Venugopal and N'dea Yancey-Bragg, USA TODAY; Eduardo Cuevas, Rockland/Westchester Journal News

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Police still searching for 'person of interest' in Brooklyn subway shooting: What we know

After bullets flew, NYC subway workers kept their cool .
NEW YORK (AP) — When smoke bombs and bullets were unleashed on a subway full of morning commuters as it crawled toward a stop in Brooklyn, the train's driver, David Artis, couldn't hear the shots. His first indication something was wrong was when passengers crowded near the door to his operator's compartment to report chaos, one car back. Artis said after a moment of shock, his thoughts quickly shifted from, “Oh my God!” to concern for his passengers. He leaned on his emergency training.“Then it kicked in. Get them out,” he said Friday after he and fellow transit workers were honored by the mayor for their response to Tuesday's shooting.

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