Crime: 10-Year-Old Uvalde Shooting Victim is Last to Leave Hospital, Following Two Months of Treatment

Abbott spent hours at fundraiser after Uvalde shooting

  Abbott spent hours at fundraiser after Uvalde shooting AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has said that he stopped at a campaign fundraiser following the deadly school shooting in Uvalde and “let people know” he couldn't stay, but a newspaper reports that he was there for nearly three hours. The Dallas Morning News reported Thursday that campaign finance reports and flight-tracking records show that Abbott arrived in Huntsville at 4:52 p.m. on May 24 — hours after the shooting at Robb Elementary School — and then was driven about 2 miles (3 kilometers) to a local supporter's house. He didn't leave the city till 7:47 p.m. An 18-year-old shooter entered the school at 11:33 a.m. that day but it was not till 12:50 p.m.

GoFundMe Mayah Zamora © Provided by People GoFundMe Mayah Zamora

A 10-year-old girl has been released from a hospital in San Antonio, Texas making her the last Robb Elementary School shooting survivor to leave the hospital since the incident more than two months ago in Uvalde.

University Health tweeted a touching video of the moment Mayah Zamora left the hospital on Friday, to the applause and cheers of medical staff who chanted "Mayah! Mayah! Mayah!"

Staff was then shown following Mayah to her car, waving goodbye as she and her family drove away from the hospital.

A follow-up post from the hospital featured four photos of Mayah, wearing a brace on her left arm, giving out roses to medical staff and smiling from inside her family's vehicle as she left.

Uvalde elementary school principal moving to district administrative post

  Uvalde elementary school principal moving to district administrative post Robb Elementary School Principal Mandy Gutierrez has accepted a position as assistant director of special education, the district's superintendent announced. Mandy Gutierrez has accepted a position as assistant director of special education, Hal Harrell, the superintendent of the Uvalde Unified Consolidated Independent School District, said in an update to the school community on Friday.

RELATED: Uvalde Victim's Google Doodle Shared, Along with Note: "I Want People to Be Happy"

"Today was a happy day at University Hospital! Our final patient from the Uvalde shooting, 10 year-old Mayah Zamora, was discharged!" the hospital tweeted. "She passed out roses and left in style thanks to @HEB. She is our hero and we can't wait to see all she accomplishes in the future! #MayahStrong"

Town near Uvalde revokes NRA-aligned group's use of city space for fundraiser

  Town near Uvalde revokes NRA-aligned group's use of city space for fundraiser The city council in Hondo, about 40 miles west of Uvalde, Texas, said it revoked permission for the organization's use of the space where they planned to host a meeting. At the special council meeting in Hondo on Monday evening, Jazmin Cazares, older sister to Jackie Cazares, who was killed at Robb Elementary School, said the planned event was "a slap in the face" to her community about 40 miles west of Hondo. She read the names and ages of every Uvalde mass shooting victim -- 19 students and two teachers -- to close her speech.

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A GoFundMe was set up to support Mayah's "long road to recovery," and has thus far raised close to $110,000 toward the family's $150,000 goal.

"Mayah's family would like to give its most heartfelt gratitude to everyone who has donated," read a June 10 update on the fundraiser. "Mayah has a very long road to recovery, and we're going to be with her the entire way."

RELATED: 'We're in a Nightmare': Stories of Anguish and Love from Uvalde

CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images A memorial for the victims of the Robb Elementary School shooting. © Provided by People CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images A memorial for the victims of the Robb Elementary School shooting.

"This long road includes numerous surgeries Mayah had undergone, future surgeries she may require, future hospital and doctor's visits, mental health/trauma treatment, amongst many other things," the family added.

Top gun CEOs testifying on Capitol Hill, blame 'erosion of personal responsibility'

  Top gun CEOs testifying on Capitol Hill, blame 'erosion of personal responsibility' Leading gun manufacturing executives are testifying Wednesday before a House panel investigating the role of the firearms industry in the nation's rates of gun violence The hearing, beginning at 10 a.m. ET and helmed by House Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney, a New York Democrat, featured two top CEOs ahead of the consideration of legislation that would target the sale of semiautomatic weapons, a move that many gun rights supporters and Republicans oppose as unconstitutional.

They concluded in the June 10 update, "Mayah's family is by her side as she receives medical care in San Antonio, about an hour and a half away from Uvalde. This family has left their home to tend to their daughter, this is emotionally, physically and financially taxing. Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated."

RELATED VIDEO: Uvalde Families Plead for Congress to Strengthen Gun Laws: "I Will Never Forget What I Saw That Day"

On May 24, an 18-year-old gunman entered Robb Elementary School through an open back door and began firing more than 100 rounds inside two fourth-grade classrooms. A total of 21 people were killed, including two teachers and 19 children.

The response to the shooting has been scrutinized intensely since the incident, resulting in the resignation of the city's mayor. Many parents of victims have also shared how they feel that officers didn't do enough.

A 77-page document released last month, compiled by a Texas House Investigative Committee, said there was "an overall lackadaisical approach" from law enforcement at the scene.

"There is no one to whom we can attribute malice or ill motives," the report said. "Instead, we found systemic failures and egregious poor decision-making. We recognize that the impact of this tragedy is felt most profoundly by the people of Uvalde in ways we cannot fully comprehend."

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