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Politics: Worse than it looks: Dozens of Republicans went out of their way to vote against same-sex marriage bill

Senate passes landmark bill protecting same-sex marriage nationwide. It's expected to pass the House and be signed into law by Biden

  Senate passes landmark bill protecting same-sex marriage nationwide. It's expected to pass the House and be signed into law by Biden The bill is headed to the House, which is expected to pass it, and then to President Joe Biden's desk.With a 61-36 vote, the bill is headed to the House, which is expected to pass it as soon as next week, and then to President Joe Biden's desk.

The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday passed the Respect for Marriage Act a second time, approving even stronger religious liberty protections after the legislation was changed in the Senate. But this time was different – this time Republicans really showed up, in even bigger numbers, to vote no.

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And it’s worse than it looks.

The bill once again did pass, and will now be signed into law by President Joe Biden.

But how we got here does not bode well for the future of civil rights.

READ MORE: Watch: ‘Biblical Conservative’ Republican Likens Bestiality and Polygamy to Same-Sex Marriage in Angry Speech Against Bill

Senate votes 61-36 to codify rights to same-sex, interracial marriages

  Senate votes 61-36 to codify rights to same-sex, interracial marriages WASHINGTON – The Senate voted overwhelmingly Thursday to confirm the nationwide legality of same-sex and interracial marriage Tuesday — with 12 Republicans joining all Democrats in assent. The 61-36 vote followed House passage of the bill in July with almost a quarter of lower-chamber Republicans voting in support. The bill must now go back to the House for final approval, which is likely to come next week. President Biden intends to sign the law, which was motivated by fear that the Supreme Court could one day reverse itself and invalidate such marriages. A bipartisan group of legislators pitched the bill after the Supreme Court in June overturned Roe v.

On July 19, the bill passed the House 267-157, with 47 Republicans voting yes and all 157 no votes also coming from Republicans.

On Thursday the bill passed in a 258-169 vote, with just 39 Republicans voting yes and all 169 no votes again coming from Republicans.

Just looking at the overall vote totals, comparing the vote in July to the vote on Thursday, it’s easy to think eight Republicans (47 minus 39) switched their yes vote to no.

It’s a bit more complicated.

And it’s the no votes that are striking. Because in reality, this time a lot more Republicans voted no.

READ MORE: Watch: Speaker Pelosi Excitedly Announces House Passage of Same-Sex Marriage Protection Bill – 169 Republicans Vote No

Eight Republicans who did not vote in July showed up this time to vote no. Only one who did not vote in July voted yes on Thursday.

Who are the 12 Republican Senators who voted for the Respect for Marriage Act?

  Who are the 12 Republican Senators who voted for the Respect for Marriage Act? The new legislation would provide federal protection for same-sex marriage, which was previously secured only on account of a Supreme Court ruling. The Senate Republicans who voted in favour of the Respect for Marriage Act were Sens. Susan Collins (Maine), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Rob Portman (Ohio), Thom Tillis (N.C.), Mitt Romney (Utah), Roy Blunt (Mo.), Cynthia Lummis (Wyo.), Richard Burr (N.C.), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Dan Sullivan (Alaska), Joni Ernst (Iowa) and Todd Young (Ind.).

Another six Republicans switched their vote from yes in July to no on Thursday.

Two who voted yes in July did not vote on Thursday.

One switched from no to yes.

One switched from yes to present.

One who voted no in July is now deceased.

Republicans on the House floor on Thursday made their message clear.

Republicans like Rep. Vicky Hartzler of Missouri, a former anti-LGBTQ activist who worked for an organization created to block same-sex marriage. She literally cried own the floor begging her colleagues to vote no. And Rep. Bob Good of Virginia, who said practically everything wrong in society can be traced back to same-sex marriage.

Here’s the breakdown. (If they are not listed they voted no.)

Here’s how we get to eight fewer yes votes:

Bentz Republican Oregon Yes to No

Mast Republican Florida Yes to No

Meuser Republican Pennsylvania Yes to No

Here are the GOP senators who voted against the same-sex marriage bill

  Here are the GOP senators who voted against the same-sex marriage bill Senators passed the Respect for Marriage Act on Tuesday, a landmark piece of legislation that protects same-sex and interracial marriages, placing the bill one step closer to becoming law. The bill passed in a 61-36 vote with 49 Democrats and 12 Republicans voting in favor of the bill. Lawmakers took up the bill after the…The bill passed in a 61-36 vote with 49 Democrats and 12 Republicans voting in favor of the bill.

Perry Republican Pennsylvania Yes to No

What Congress’s same-sex marriage bill actually does

  What Congress’s same-sex marriage bill actually does Washington Post Live Anchor Leigh Ann Caldwell, Democratic pollster Cornell Belcher and Editor and CEO of The Dispatch Stephen Hayes join the Meet The Press NOW roundtable to discuss the Georgia runoff, Trump's dinner with Nick Fuentes and Ye and the implications on the 2024 GOP presidential field.

Salazar Republican Florida Yes to No

Van Drew Republican New Jersey Yes to No

Owens Republican Utah Yes to Present

Kinzinger Republican Illinois Yes to Did Not Vote

Zeldin Republican New York Yes to Did Not Vote

Herrera Beutler Republican Washington No to Yes

Here’s how we get a lot more no votes:

Babin Republican Texas Did Not Vote to No

Burchett Republican Tennessee Did Not Vote to No

Diaz-Balart Republican Florida Did Not Vote to No

Finstad Republican Minnesota Did Not Vote to No

Hartzler Republican Missouri Did Not Vote to No

Lucas Republican Oklahoma Did Not Vote to No

McKinley Republican West Virginia Did Not Vote to No

Miller (WV) Republican West Virginia Did Not Vote to No

Gallagher Republican Wisconsin No to Did Not Vote

Sempolinski Republican New York New Member to No

Yakym Republican Indiana New Member to No

Brady Republican Texas No to Did Not Vote

Walorski Republican Indiana No to deceased

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