Politics: Biden clean-energy plan would spend $2 trillion over four years

2020 Is Our Last, Best Chance to Save the Planet

  2020 Is Our Last, Best Chance to Save the Planet The world was ready to tackle climate change. Then 2020 happenedIn early April, as COVID-19 spread across the U.S. and doctors urgently warned that New York City might soon run out of ventilators and hospital beds, President Donald Trump gathered CEOs from some of the country’s biggest oil and gas companies for a closed-door meeting in the White House Cabinet Room. The industry faced its biggest disruption in decades, and Trump wanted to help the companies secure their place at the center of the 21st century American economy.

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Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks about U.S. economy at a metal works plant in Dunmore, Pennsylvania © Reuters/Tom Brenner FILE PHOTO: Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks about U.S. economy at a metal works plant in Dunmore, Pennsylvania

WILMINGTON, Del. (Reuters) - Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Tuesday will lay out an ambitious climate plan that would seek to spend $2 trillion in his first term as president investing in clean-energy infrastructure while vowing to cut carbon emissions from electrical power to zero in 15 years.

The plan, which Biden will detail at a campaign event in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware, signifies a more aggressive approach on climate policy than he adopted during the Democratic presidential primary – a nod to progressives within the party who have been clamoring for swift action.

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  Fact check: Pence and Trump campaign take Biden's policing comments out of context In public comments and in advertising, President Donald Trump and his allies have tried to cast Democratic opponent Joe Biden as an anti-police radical. © Spencer Platt/Getty Images North America/Getty Images DUNMORE, PENNSYLVANIA - JULY 09: The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks at McGregor Industries on July 09, 2020 in Dunmore, Pennsylvania. The former vice president, who grew up in nearby Scranton, toured a metal works plant in Dunmore in northeastern Pennsylvania and spoke about his economic recovery plan.

Biden frequently refers to climate change as “an existential threat” and had faced pressure from the left to adopt more expansive policies.

His revised climate plan would require the country to be producing 100% clean electricity by 2035, moving up his original target date by 15 years – a timeline borrowed from former presidential candidates Jay Inslee and Elizabeth Warren.

Biden also would spend more money more quickly, calling for $2 trillion in new spending over four years, according to a copy of the plan released by his campaign. He had originally suggested spending $1.7 trillion over a decade.

The plan would seek to boost the U.S. auto industry through incentives for manufacturers to produce zero-emission electric vehicles. And it would look to build 1.5 million new energy-efficient homes and public-housing units.

Biden proposes plan to reach 100% clean electricity by 2035

  Biden proposes plan to reach 100% clean electricity by 2035 Former vice president Joe Biden released a plan on Tuesday that calls for a carbon-free power system by 2035 and proposed $2 trillion in green energy spending. The campaign described the proposal, which would move the nation rapidly toward a quick reduction of its reliance on fossil fuels, as a jobs and infrastructure plan, building upon and incorporating his initial climate policy, by "scaling up and accelerating our investments to meet the moment we are in: an economic crisis," according to one campaign adviser.

Biden has argued his climate plan will create millions of new jobs, an effort in part to win over skeptical union workers in the oil and gas industries. “It’s a false choice to suggest we have to pick between our economy and the planet,” Biden said at an online fundraiser on Monday.

His plan also has a large environmental justice emphasis and would direct 40% of clean-energy spending toward disadvantaged communities in the shadows of refineries and power plants.

Campaign advisers on Tuesday said the plan is a component of Biden’s overall economic recovery package, which, they said, would represent the largest mobilization of public investment since World War Two.

They acknowledged that the climate plan was an effort to seize the issue from President Donald Trump, who Biden will face in the Nov. 3 election. Trump has frequently advocated for massive infrastructure legislation but has failed to send any kind of outline to the U.S. Congress.

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden campaign adopts carbon-free power by 2035 in $2T environment plan | Trump administration has been underestimating costs of carbon pollution, government watchdog finds | Trump to move forward with rollback of bedrock environmental

  OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden campaign adopts carbon-free power by 2035 in $2T environment plan | Trump administration has been underestimating costs of carbon pollution, government watchdog finds | Trump to move forward with rollback of bedrock environmental HAPPY TUESDAY! Welcome to Overnight Energy, The Hill's roundup of the latest energy and environment news. Please send tips and comments to Rebecca Beitsch at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter: @rebeccabeitsch. Reach Rachel Frazin at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin.CLICK HERE to subscribe to our newsletter.PLAN ON IT: Former Vice President Joe Biden will aim to make electricity generation carbon free by 2035 as part of a $2 trillion climate and infrastructure plan should he win the White House in November.The plan, unveiled Tuesday, comes as an addition to the Democratic candidate's existing climate plan, which calls for a $1.

The Trump campaign in a statement said Biden had "fully caved in to the extreme left" with his energy plan and asked how Americans would afford it.

Many of Biden’s proposals could be done through executive orders, aides said. But the large-scale outlays would require congressional approval.

Congress has authorized $3 trillion in spending this year already to mitigate the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, but Biden aides said the economy will likely require another large stimulus early next year.

(Additional reporting and writing by James Oliphant; Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Alistair Bell)


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Biden plans, addressing issues from climate to elder care, near $10 trillion price tag .
Joe Biden, through his presidential campaign, is proposing over $8 trillion in new spending on a variety of programs – an ever-increasing tally that rises to around $10 trillion based on some estimates. © Provided by FOX News Reaction from 'The Liberal Invasion of Red State America' author Kristin Tate. The hefty price tag counts several of his most expensive plans, including a $2 trillion climate plan and a $775 billion program for universal preschool, and expanded child care and in-home elder care that was announced on Tuesday.

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