Politics: All the ex-Trump officials who have publicly vowed not to vote for him in November

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Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a rally at Central Wisconsin Airport on September 17, 2020 in Mosinee, Wisconsin. Scott Olson/Getty Images © Scott Olson/Getty Images President Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a rally at Central Wisconsin Airport on September 17, 2020 in Mosinee, Wisconsin. Scott Olson/Getty Images
  • President Donald Trump has experienced record-setting turnover during his time in office.
  • Many of these former officials have not only gone on to publicly criticize the president, but also create anti-Trump groups and voice their support for Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden.
  • The list of ex-Trump employees who say they will not vote for Trump continues to grow.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump's administration has been rocked by an historic turnover rate, higher than his five predecessors' in their entire first terms, the Brookings Institute found.

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Many of his ex-employees have slid out of the public eye, while others have chosen to launch scathing attacks on the president and publicly disavow him.

Some Republicans not only plan to vote for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, but have also established political coalitions such as The Lincoln Project, Republican Voters Against Trump, 43 Alumni for Joe Biden PAC, and others.

The groups see an opening to sway the votes of independent, undecided, and moderate Republicans. To that end, they have raised millions of dollars, spending that money on campaign ads aimed at ousting Trump from the White House.

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Here is a list of all the former Trump administration officials who have indicated they will not vote for Trump:

a woman looking at the camera: Olivia Troye, Vice President Mike Pence's former homeland security, counterterrorism, and coronavirus adviser Screenshot/Republican Voters Against Trump © Screenshot/Republican Voters Against Trump Olivia Troye, Vice President Mike Pence's former homeland security, counterterrorism, and coronavirus adviser Screenshot/Republican Voters Against Trump

Olivia Troye, former adviser on counterterrorism and homeland security to Vice President Mike Pence: Troye worked for Pence for the past two years until she left her post last month, after most recently serving on his coronavirus task force. In a new campaign ad released Thursday, Troye slammed Trump for his response to the public health crisis and accused the president of saying that the pandemic was a "good thing" because it prevented him from having to shake hands with "disgusting people," who she said were his supporters.

Miles Taylor, former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff: Taylor worked under the Trump administration for two years and later called the experience "terrifying." Many things Trump wanted the department to do were illegal, he alleged. Taylor endorsed Biden saying he's "confident that he won't make the same mistakes as this president" and announced in August the creation of an anti-Trump group called the Republican Political Alliance for Integrity and Reform (REPAIR).

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Josh Venable, former chief of staff for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos: Venable served in his position from the start of Trump's presidency until October 2018. On Thursday, he joined REPAIR to help "outline a more hopeful vision of America's future," according to a statement reported by Politico.

Elizabeth Neumann, former assistant secretary of counterterrorism and threat prevention at DHS: Neumann worked at the DHS for three years before resigning this April, lambasting Trump for "throwing fuel on the fire" of the threat of domestic terrorism. In a campaign ad, she revealed that she is voting for Biden since Americans are "less safe today because of his leadership," referring to Trump.

Anthony Scaramucci wearing a suit and tie: Anthony Scaramucci speaks to reporters during his brief tenure as White House communications director in 2017. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images © JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images Anthony Scaramucci speaks to reporters during his brief tenure as White House communications director in 2017. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Anthony Scaramucci, former White House communications director: Scaramucci had a brief tenure with the Trump administration — less than two weeks in July 2017 — but was featured on Trump's Twitter page long afterward as the president continued to criticize him. Earlier this year, Scaramucci voiced his support for Biden, saying, "Of course I'll campaign for him, we gotta beat Trump."

AOC and Schumer say 'all options are on the table' to stall nomination

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Donald Trump, John R. Bolton are posing for a picture: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as National Security Adviser John Bolton listens during a meeting with President of Romania Klaus Iohannis in the Oval Office of the White House August 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images © Alex Wong/Getty Images U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media as National Security Adviser John Bolton listens during a meeting with President of Romania Klaus Iohannis in the Oval Office of the White House August 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images

John Bolton, former national security adviser: Bolton left the Trump administration in September 2019, after serving for about 16 months. He reinserted himself into the limelight earlier this year by publishing a tell-all memoir, in which he characterized Trump as erratic and unfit for office. He said in an interview with Business Insider that he doesn't plan to vote for Trump or Biden, and will instead write in the name of a conservative Republican.

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