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Politics: Donor Sues Pro-Trump Group for $2.5 Million for Failing to Prove Voter Fraud

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A North Carolina money manager is suing a pro - Trump group for $ 2 . 5 million after the group failed to show evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election or provide him with updates on their efforts. Fred Eshelman donated the money to True the Vote Inc., a Houston-based organization, which had promised to "investigate, litigate, and expose suspected illegal balloting and fraud in the 2020 general election," according to Bloomberg. Eshelman, who is the founder of Eshelman Ventures LLC, now wants his money back because True the Vote did not provide him with information about their

A donor has sued a pro - Trump group for $ 2 . 5 million over “empty promises” after he says it failed to prove voter fraud in the presidential election. Fred Eshelman sued Houston-based True the Vote Inc., which promised to “investigate, litigate and expose suspected illegal balloting ad fraud in the 2020 general election,” Bloomberg reported. Eshelman, founder of Eshelman Ventures LLC, claimed that he “regularly and repeatedly” asked for updates on the initiative but was met with “vague responses, platitudes, and empty promises.”

A North Carolina money manager is suing a pro-Trump group for $2.5 million after the group failed to show evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election or provide him with updates on their efforts.

a person holding a stop sign: Supporters of President Donald Trump gather outside of the Wyndham Gettysburg hotel prior to a Pennsylvania Senate Majority Policy Committee public hearing Wednesday to discuss 2020 election issues and irregularities with President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani on November 25, 2020 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Giuliani is continuing his push to overturn election results in the courts. There has been no evidence of widespread voter fraud so far. © Samuel Corum/Getty Images Supporters of President Donald Trump gather outside of the Wyndham Gettysburg hotel prior to a Pennsylvania Senate Majority Policy Committee public hearing Wednesday to discuss 2020 election issues and irregularities with President Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani on November 25, 2020 in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Giuliani is continuing his push to overturn election results in the courts. There has been no evidence of widespread voter fraud so far.

Fred Eshelman donated the money to True the Vote Inc., a Houston-based organization, which had promised to "investigate, litigate, and expose suspected illegal balloting and fraud in the 2020 general election," according to Bloomberg.

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A Republican donor filed a federal suit saying he was "duped" after donating $ 2 . 5 million to investigate illegal conduct and fraud in the 2020 election. 26 (UPI) -- A North Carolina businessman and Republican donor filed suit in federal court saying he was duped by a Texas group that claimed they would file lawsuits to uncover election fraud on behalf of President Donald Trump . Fredric N. Eshelman, founder of venture capital firm Eshelman Ventures LLC, said he donated $ 2 . 5 million to Houston-based nonprofit True the Vote Inc. to support the organization's investigations into "illegal

Businessman Fredric Eshelman sues pro - Trump ‘election ethics’ group citing ‘disappointing results’ of effort to expose cheating. A Donald Trump supporter who donated $ 2 . 5 m to help expose and prosecute claims of fraud in the presidential election wants his money back after what he says are “disappointing results”. Fredric Eshelman, a businessman from North Carolina, said he gave the money to True the Vote , a pro - Trump “election ethics” group in Texas that promised to file lawsuits in seven swing states as part of its push to “investigate, litigate, and expose suspected illegal balloting and

Eshelman, who is the founder of Eshelman Ventures LLC, now wants his money back because True the Vote did not provide him with information about their progress and he believes they can't achieve what they claimed.

True the Vote filed four lawsuits following the election on November 3 but has subsequently dropped all of them.

"While we stand by the voters' testimony that was brought forth, barriers to advancing our arguments, coupled with constraints on time, made it necessary for us to pursue a different path," the group announced on its website on November 17.

Their attempt to challenge the election results was called Validate the Vote and was to involve lawsuits in seven swing states. They also planned to collect evidence, lobby Republican legislatures and use "sophisticated data modeling and statistical analysis to identify potential illegal or fraudulent balloting."

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The group offered million back if he didn't sue . Should he get all of his money back? Why or why not? Hell, even Rudy Giuliani could find some if he had a couple of semi-competent primates assisting him. The “reason” that Donald Trump ’s attorneys are not arguing voter fraud in their court cases is BECAUSE THEY CAN’T… such a thing requires EVIDENCE. Of which they have not nearly enough to make a difference in the vote tally even in places where the votes were ridiculously close.

True the Vote , the very grifty tea bagger group founded in Houston, claims they fight voter fraud . But donor Fred Eshelman is suing True the Vote for $ 2 . 5 million because they couldn't deliver the goods on this election. True the Vote , which was founded by Tea Party supporter Catherine Engelbrecht 11 years ago, filed four lawsuits after the November 3 election but has dropped all of them—and in an official statement on November 17, True the Vote announced, "while we stand by the voters ' testimony that was brought forth, barriers to advancing our arguments, coupled with constraints on time, made.

Eshelman wired the group $2 million on November 5 and then sent them a further $500,000 the following week but True the Vote did not provide him with updates on their activities. He claimed he regularly asked for information but was "met with vague responses, platitudes, and empty promises."

As state deadlines for the certification of votes approached, Eshelman reportedly realized the group couldn't achieve what they claimed and so asked for his donation back.

True the Vote offered him $1 million if he agreed not to sue, his complaint alleges. His suit against them has now been filed in District Court in the Southern District of Texas.

It's not clear at this early stage if Eshelman's case will succeed but the veteran businessman appears to have the necessary funds to pursue his complaint. In 2014, he donated $100 million to the School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where he was a student.

Voter-fraud debunking journalist Isaac Saul talks about his viral election thread and why the conspiracy theories put poll workers in danger

  Voter-fraud debunking journalist Isaac Saul talks about his viral election thread and why the conspiracy theories put poll workers in danger Isaac Saul's viral Twitter thread debunks each Trumpworld fake voter fraud claim, one tweet at a time.That same day, the journalist Issac Saul began documenting and debunking as many voter fraud conspiracy theories as possible in an ever-growing thread that he continues to update more than two weeks later.

North Carolina businessman Fred Eshelman, founder of Eshelman Ventures LLC, is suing True the Vote Inc., after he donated $ 2 . 5 million to the group , according to Bloomberg and The Hill. The suit filed in Houston federal court says True the Vote claimed it would be filing lawsuits in swing states, collecting In the weeks since Joe Biden was announced as the winner, the Trump administration and its supporters have repeated still unproven claims of voter fraud . Officials at state and federal levels have denied any evidence of voter fraud exists and a majority of cases filed by the Trump campaign

Several conservative groups have made fundraising pitches based on unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud in the presidential election, including President Donald Trump's campaign.

There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud or irregularities during the 2020 election despite the Trump campaign's ongoing and largely unsuccessful litigation efforts.

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Opinions | Trump’s voter fraud yarn is unraveling. But it can still help the GOP. .
Republicans can use today’s rhetoric to thwart tomorrow’s turnout. As the month wore on, Republican leaders gradually acknowledged reality: that Trump lost and has no legitimate recourse. Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.) congratulated President-elect Joe Biden and encouraged Trump to “accept the outcome of the election.” Sen. Bill Cassidy (La.) tweeted, “President Trump’s legal team has not presented evidence of the massive fraud which would have had to be present to overturn the election. I voted for President Trump but Joe Biden won.” In an interview published this week, Attorney General William P.

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