Politics: De Blasio trashes ‘opportunistic’ alliance between NYC mayoral candidates Andrew Yang and Kathryn Garcia

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Mayor de Blasio Monday derided as “opportunistic” the 11th-hour alliance between NYC mayoral candidates Andrew Yang and Kathryn Garcia.

With just hours to go before polls open Tuesday, de Blasio noted that the ranked-choice voting system is designed to help supporters of two candidates who broadly share “similar views and a similar vision” to vote for both of them.

Hizzoner said the Garcia/Yang alliance appears to be more like a political marriage of convenience.

“This one strikes me as an odd couple situation and a little more opportunistic,” de Blasio said. “These are two people who don’t seem to share a lot of positions.”

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a person standing in front of a graffiti covered wall: New York City mayoral candidates Andrew Yang (left) and Kathryn Garcia (right) © Brittainy Newman New York City mayoral candidates Andrew Yang (left) and Kathryn Garcia (right)

New York City mayoral candidates Andrew Yang (left) and Kathryn Garcia (right) (Brittainy Newman/)

De Blasio, who hasn’t made an endorsement, refused to comment on frontrunner Eric Adams’ increasingly strident attacks on the two rivals.

The Brooklyn borough president has accused Garcia and Yang of joining forces to prevent a Black candidate from winning the crowded race.

Adams and his surrogates have denounced the pact as voter suppression and compared it to policies design to prevent Black people from voting.

“African Americans are very clear about voter suppression,” Adams said on CNN Monday. “We know about the poll tax and we know about the fight we’ve had historically.”

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Eric Adams standing in front of a crowd: New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams © Provided by New York Daily News New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams (Theodore Parisienne/)

De Blasio said he didn’t think Adams meant to call his rivals racist and insisted he wanted to focus on urging New Yorkers to vote.

Eight major candidates are running for the Democratic nomination, including progressive lawyer Maya Wiley, Adams, Yang and Garcia. Polls say Adams is narrowly leading the pack but many voters remain undecided.

The mayor warned New Yorkers that it could be days or even weeks before they will know the winner of the crowded primary that will be decided using the newfangled voting system.

Bill de Blasio in a suit using a computer: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio © Provided by New York Daily News New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office/)

The initial count of first-place ballots won’t be finished till next week at the earliest, since mail-in ballots may be received until June 29. After that, if no one wins a majority as expected, elections officials will start allocating voters’ No. 2 and lower picks.

“We will just have to exercise a little patience, which is not something New Yorkers are known for,” de Blasio said.

Check out our special section for the latest news on the critical 2021 elections in NYC. And to have the essential news and analysis sent to your inbox, sign up for our Campaign Diaries newsletter.

Opinion: Seven things to know about NYC mayoral race .
Errol Louis writes that the fiercely contested Democratic primary for mayor of New York City is the most consequential election in years. The most pressing issues of this race will likely resonate beyond the city and have the potential of setting the agenda of the Democratic Party.The race offers a window into issues of crime, race, social justice and economic inequality that will resonate well beyond the confines of the city and could end up setting the agenda of a Democratic Party seeking to satisfy and expand its restive, politically potent urban base. Furthermore, winning the Democratic primary normally spells victory in November given the city's political makeup.

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