Politics: Still bullish on bipartisanship and filibuster, Biden sees infrastructure bill moving ahead on Monday

Biden to call for 'a new coalition' to defend voting rights

  Biden to call for 'a new coalition' to defend voting rights During his speech in Philadelphia on Tuesday, the president will say GOP election bills are "grounded in autocracy, undemocratic."And the president will call for a “new coalition” of advocates, activists, students, faith leaders, labor leaders, and business executives “to overcome this un-American trend and meet the moment” through “turnout and voter education.

The bipartisan infrastructure deal senators brokered with President Joe Biden is hanging precariously ahead of a crucial Wednesday test vote as senators struggle over how to pay for nearly trillion in public works spending. Tensions were rising Tuesday as Republicans prepared to block the vote, mounting a filibuster over what they see as a rushed and misguided process. With Biden preparing to hit the road to rally support for his big infrastructure ideas — including some .5 trillion in a follow up bill — restless Democrats say it’s time to at least start debate on this first phase of his proposals.

Biden still believes bipartisanship can work, but says "the well has been so poisoned" over the past 4 years. From CNN's Jason Hoffman. President Biden , once again pointing to his history of compromise while working in the Senate and as vice president, said he still believes bipartisanship can produce results in Congress, but conceded that the But what is a filibuster , and why do Democrats want to change it? The short version of the story is that Democrats want to reinterpret Senate rules so they can use just 50 votes to pass things like the voting rights bill or Biden 's massive infrastructure package.

With much of his voting rights agenda stalled in Congress, the coronavirus pandemic entering a dangerous, politicized new phase and the fate of a much-needed plan to address the nation’s crumbling infrastructure still in doubt, President Biden on Wednesday stood by his support of the Senate filibuster.

Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: President Biden at a CNN town hall in Cincinnati on Wednesday night. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images) © Provided by Yahoo! News President Biden at a CNN town hall in Cincinnati on Wednesday night. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

“What I don’t want to do is get wrapped up around whether this is all about the filibuster,” Biden said during a CNN town hall in Cincinnati, when asked by host Don Lemon why he continues to support a procedure he has called “a Jim Crow relic.”

Biden's silence on filibuster strains Democrats' patience

  Biden's silence on filibuster strains Democrats' patience President Biden gave an impassioned speech this week on democracy and protecting the right to vote, but Democratic strategists and activists say it's something he failed to mention - namely filibuster reform - that could cost him."This is really the first place that Biden risks losing the base," said one top Democratic strategist."It's no accident that it's the issue of voting rights. I think Black voters feel like 'we did the hard work and"This is really the first place that Biden risks losing the base," said one top Democratic strategist.

The bipartisan infrastructure deal senators brokered with President Joe Biden is hanging precariously ahead of a crucial Wednesday test vote as senators struggle over how to pay for nearly trillion in public works spending. Tensions were rising as Republicans prepared to mount a filibuster over what they see as a rushed and misguided process. With Biden preparing to hit the road to rally support for his big infrastructure ideas — including some .5 trillion in a follow-up bill — restless Democrats say it’s time to at least start debate on this first phase of his proposals.

The bipartisan infrastructure deal senators brokered with President Joe Biden is hanging precariously ahead of a crucial Wednesday test vote as they struggle over how to pay for nearly trillion in public works spending. Tensions were rising as Republicans prepared to mount a filibuster over what they With Biden preparing to hit the road to rally support for his big infrastructure ideas — including some .5 trillion in a follow-up bill — restless Democrats say it's time to at least start debate on this first phase of his proposals. “It is not a fish or cut bait moment,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer

Biden added that abolishing the filibuster — which prevents legislation from moving forward in the absence of 60 votes — would “throw the entire Congress into chaos and nothing will get done.”

The president defended his belief that a bipartisan approach in Washington remained a viable way to run the government as well as to help repair the deep divisions between Americans.

“I spent a lot of time as a senator and vice president and I’m going to say something outrageous: I don’t think you’ll find any Republican I ever worked with who said I broke my word,” Biden told a skeptical audience member who inquired whether it was worth trying to work across the aisle with Republicans who have largely sought to block his agenda.

Biden assured the audience that his decades-long tenure as a senator had given him absolute faith in the ability for Democrats to forge constructive compromises with Republicans. The president cited Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, who he said privately gave him his word that a deal to move the bipartisan infrastructure deal was within reach.

Biden says he doesn't want voting rights 'wrapped up' in filibuster debate

  Biden says he doesn't want voting rights 'wrapped up' in filibuster debate President Biden on Wednesday pushed back on calls from some progressives to do away with the filibuster or making an exception for voting rights legislation, even as he called efforts by Republican state legislatures to restrict ballot access "Jim Crow on steroids.""I've been saying for a long, long time the abuse of the filibuster is pretty overwhelming," Biden said at a CNN town hall in Ohio, reiterating his belief that the Senate should return to the talking filibuster that requires a lawmaker to stand on the floor to block legislation. "I would go back to that where you have to maintain the floor," Biden said.

President Joe Biden 's pledge to restore a tradition of bipartisan deal-making in Washington is facing an early test as a divided Congress weighs his ambitious pandemic relief plan. Reid acknowledged that getting rid of the filibuster -- or any moves to go around Republicans -- would undercut Biden 's political brand. But the Nevada Democrat argued that his former colleague will likely have to choose between being an icon of bipartisanship and a President with a lengthy list of accomplishments.

The bipartisan infrastructure deal senators brokered with President Joe Biden is hanging precariously ahead of a crucial Wednesday test vote as they struggle over how to pay for nearly trillion in public works spending. Tensions were rising as Republicans prepared to mount a filibuster over what they With Biden preparing to hit the road to rally support for his big infrastructure ideas — including some .5 trillion in a follow-up bill — restless Democrats say it's time to at least start debate on this first phase of his proposals. “It is not a fish or cut bait moment,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer

A procedural test vote on the aforementioned infrastructure framework failed earlier Wednesday due to GOP resistance. Biden, however, dismissed the failure as “irrelevant” during the town hall.

“I come from a tradition in the Senate, you shake your hand, that’s it. You keep your word,” said Biden. “And I’ve found Rob Portman does that. I’ve found ... your governor is a good man. You shake his hand, it’s done.”


Video: Senate Democrats take their case for voting bill to Georgia (Associated Press)

Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: Biden in Cincinnati on Wednesday. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images) © Provided by Yahoo! News Biden in Cincinnati on Wednesday. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

Biden said that he’s confident that the Senate will pass a motion to proceed on debate of the bill by Monday, noting that it’s entirely possible and that Democrats may still have to offer further concessions on contentious issues.

He also revealed that several Republicans have confided in him that they’ve agreed with his point of view but voted along party lines out of fear of losing their jobs.

'The glue that is holding us all together': Joe Biden rides herd on Democrats ahead of tough 2022 election cycle

  'The glue that is holding us all together': Joe Biden rides herd on Democrats ahead of tough 2022 election cycle Biden has been a driving force as the Democratic National Committee gears up for the 2022 elections in which control of Congress is at stake.But behind the scenes, the chief executive is playing another role: Democratic Party leader.

The "Build Back Better" infrastructure proposal that White House aides are putting together would be segmented into two separate parts -- one focused on infrastructure and clean energy, and a second focused on what's being termed the "care economy" with a focus zeroed in on key domestic The President plans to pursue bipartisan support, according to his advisers. He's already held multiple bipartisan Oval Office meetings on the issue. During a meeting with labor leaders in February, Biden repeatedly stressed that he thought there was a path for bipartisanship on the issue, according to an

“The well has been so poisoned over the last four years and even now, there is still this lingering effort,” he explained, in a less-than-veiled criticism of the former administration. Biden was also critical of the divisions that have been exacerbated by those who cling to conspiracy theories peddled by former President Donald Trump as well as the fringe group QAnon that the 2020 election was decided by fraud.

“I don’t care if you think I’m Satan reincarnated, the fact is you can’t look at that television and say nothing happened on the 6th. You can’t listen to people who say this is a peaceful march,” Biden said of the riot at the Capitol carried out by Trump’s supporters, adding, “I think we’re beginning to see sort of the venom leak out of a lot of it. We’ve got to get beyond this.”

For all his talk of bipartisanship, however, Biden remained critical of Republicans when discussing their framing of Democrats' contentious relationship with law enforcement. Many in the GOP have seized on rising crime rates across the country, perhaps imperiling legislative negotiations over police reform, and painting Democrats as anti-police.

Joe Biden has a change of heart regarding the filibuster ... again

  Joe Biden has a change of heart regarding the filibuster ... again Mark it down as another flip-flop: President Joe Biden came out against abolishing the legislative filibuster on Wednesday night after previously suggesting he would support leftist efforts to get rid of it. © Provided by Washington Examiner When asked whether the filibuster was his priority over voting access, Biden said during a televised townhall: “No, it’s not. There’s no reason to protect it other than you’re going to throw the whole Congress into chaos, and nothing will get done.” That sounds like a pretty important reason, Joe!Biden is, of course, correct.

“They’re lying!” Biden exclaimed when asked about that notion, adding that what was needed instead of defunding law enforcement was changing the behavior of officers.

Yet, in quintessential Biden fashion, the president projected optimism throughout his town hall for the idea that a nationwide reconciliation between the two parties would eventually triumph.

“I have faith in the American people that we’ll get to the right place,” Biden said.

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Biden’s fight to de-Trumpify the courts, explained .
Biden is the president liberal court watchers have been waiting for, but he may be five years too late.A longtime member and former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Biden oversaw hundreds of judicial confirmations. He chaired the 1987 hearing that successfully convinced the Senate to reject Judge Robert Bork’s nomination to the Supreme Court; then presided over a far less successful hearing that preceded Justice Clarence Thomas’s confirmation in 1991.

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