TOP News

Politics: Texas Adds No New Districts Where Blacks, Latinos Over 50 Percent of Population

Latino groups sue over Texas redistricting

  Latino groups sue over Texas redistricting Several Latino groups and individuals filed a lawsuit challenging redistricting maps drawn by the Texas Legislature, saying they dilute Hispanic voting rights.The lawsuit was filed Monday afternoon as the Texas Legislature was nearing completion of U.S. House maps that shore up Republicans and do not add additional Latino majority districts, even though Latinos account for more than half of the state’s growth.

Texas' newly divided map added no new districts where Black or Latino voters make up more than 50 percent of the population, despite people of color accounting for more than nine of 10 new residents in the state in the past decade, the Associated Press reported.

Texas’ newly-divided map added no new districts where Black or Latino voters make up more than 50 percent of the population, despite people of color accounting for more than nine of 10 new residents of the state in the past decade. The State Capitol is seen in Austin, Texas, on June 1, 2021. © Eric Gay/AP Photo Texas’ newly-divided map added no new districts where Black or Latino voters make up more than 50 percent of the population, despite people of color accounting for more than nine of 10 new residents of the state in the past decade. The State Capitol is seen in Austin, Texas, on June 1, 2021.

The new map was approved late Monday by Texas Republicans despite opposition from Democrats, who decried the speed of the redistricting process, the lack of time for public input and the decrease in so-called minority opportunity districts.

GOP eyes Youngkin performance with Latinos ahead of 2022

  GOP eyes Youngkin performance with Latinos ahead of 2022 Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin's campaign is seeking to attract Latino and Hispanic voters ahead of the upcoming election, providing both a test case and a look ahead of the GOP's strategy with the critical voting bloc ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. Youngkin has zeroed in on issues that Republicans say play well with Latino and Hispanic voters: education, the economy and combating crime."Latinos and HispanicsYoungkin has zeroed in on issues that Republicans say play well with Latino and Hispanic voters: education, the economy and combating crime.

The new map, authored by Republican state Senator Joan Huffman, reduces the number of opportunity districts for Latino voters from eight to seven, even though the Latino population drove much of Texas' growth since the last census.

"What we are doing in passing this congressional map is a disservice to the people of Texas," Democratic state Representative Rafael Anchia said to the chamber shortly ahead of the final vote on the map.

Huffman told other lawmakers that the district lines were "drawn blind to race" and that her legal team made sure the plan for the map was in line with the Voting Rights Act. Governor Greg Abbott is expected to give final approval to the map changes, AP reported.

For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.

Texas GOP consolidates power in new congressional maps as Senate again fails to act on voting rights

  Texas GOP consolidates power in new congressional maps as Senate again fails to act on voting rights With Texas Republicans bolstering their congressional majorities in new maps they approved this week, Senate Republicans in Washington, DC, on Wednesday blocked yet another voting rights bill that would crack down on those kinds of gerrymanders. © Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images The Texas State Capitol is seen on the first day of the 87th Legislative Special Session on July 8, 2021 in Austin. The maps that Texas state legislators approved this week under the once-a-decade redistricting process would consolidate the power of White voters and eliminate political competition in the state's rapidly changing suburbs.

Civil rights groups, including the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, sued before Republican lawmakers were even done Monday. The lawsuit alleges that Republican mapmakers diluted the political strength of minority voters by not drawing any new districts where Latino residents hold a majority, despite Latinos making up half of Texas' 4 million new residents over the last decade.

Abbott's office did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Republicans have said they followed the law in defending the maps, which protect their slipping grip on Texas by pulling more GOP-leaning voters into suburban districts where Democrats have made inroads in recent years.

Texas has been routinely dragged into court for decades over voting maps, and in 2017, a federal court found that a Republican-drawn map was drawn to intentionally discriminate against minority voters. But two years later, that same court said there was insufficient reason to take the extraordinary step of putting Texas back under federal supervision before changing voting laws or maps.

'I became what I didn't see': Latinx and Hispanic influencers speak up about representation

  'I became what I didn't see': Latinx and Hispanic influencers speak up about representation Black and Asian Latinx influencers are speaking up the lack of representation for those who look like them. They challenge what Latinos look like.On one side, Fernandez-Kim wasn't Korean enough and on the other, they were "too Asian to be Hispanic.

The maps that overhaul how Texas' nearly 30 million residents are sorted into political districts—and who is elected to represent them—bookends a highly charged year in the state over voting rights. Democratic lawmakers twice walked out on an elections bill that tightened the state's already strict voting rules, which they called a brazen attempt to disenfranchise minorities and other Democratic-leaning voters.

The Texas GOP control both chambers of the Legislature, giving them nearly complete control of the mapmaking process. The state has had to defend their maps in court after every redistricting process since the Voting Rights Act took effect in 1965, but this will be the first since a U.S. Supreme Court ruling said Texas and other states with a history of racial discrimination no longer need to have the Justice Department scrutinize the maps before they are approved.

However, drawing maps to engineer a political advantage is not unconstitutional. The proposal would also make an estimated two dozen of the state's 38 congressional districts safe Republican districts, with an opportunity to pick up at least one additional newly redrawn Democratic stronghold on the border with Mexico, according to an analysis by AP of data from last year's election collected by the Texas Legislative Council. Currently, Republicans hold 23 of the state's 36 seats.

Latino voters: 'Do we have your attention now?'

  Latino voters: 'Do we have your attention now?' Sustained engagement that expands the Latino electorate within and beyond battleground states should be a priority. The campaigns and parties that decide to start this work early are the ones that will see support from Latinos at the ballot box. Like everyone else, our votes must be earned, and engagement with our community must be constant, not seasonal.Ultimately, this is not a gilded revelation of political advice for any particular side - it is common sense. It is not rocket science. All it requires is that campaigns see us and that they make an effort.

Following negotiations between Texas House members and state senators, the Houston-area districts of U.S. Representative Sheila Jackson Lee, a Democrat who is serving her 14th term, and U.S. Representative Al Green, a neighboring Democrat, were restored, unpairing the two and drawing Jackson Lee's home back into her district.

Texas lawmakers also approved redrawn maps for their own districts, with Republicans following a similar plan that does not increase minority opportunity districts and would keep their party in power in the state House and Senate.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is expected to sign off on the new state redistricting map that adds no new opportunity districts for Black or Latino voters. Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas, on June 8, 2021. Eric Gay/AP Photo © Eric Gay/AP Photo Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is expected to sign off on the new state redistricting map that adds no new opportunity districts for Black or Latino voters. Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas, on June 8, 2021. Eric Gay/AP Photo

Related Articles

  • Can People Fired for Refusing COVID Vaccine Still Get Unemployment?
  • Makayla Noble Update As Almost $180,000 Raised for Paralyzed Texas Cheerleader
  • Texas Lt. Gov. Wants Biden to Ask Trump to 'Negotiate With Mexico for Him' Amid Border Crisis
  • Some College Towns Plan to Contest Census Results, Saying They Were Undercounted
  • Eric Trump Calls Out Joe Biden for Spending Time Away From White House
  • Texas Given Deadline for SCOTUS Response as High Court Mulls Taking Up Abortion Law Case

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Democrat Hala Ayala seeks to be Virginia's first Latina, female lieutenant governor .
Afro Latina Democrat Hala Ayala wants to make history as the first female, Latina lieutenant governor in Virginia in the upcoming, high-stakes elections.The Democrat says in the ad that “a little help” and “hard work” took her from the minimum wage gas station job she worked while pregnant and without health care to her middle-class life and career as a state legislator.

See also