Politics: Far-left Democrats make Nancy Pelosi delay infrastructure bill again

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says lawmakers could vote on infrastructure next week as they reach agreement on reconciliation

  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says lawmakers could vote on infrastructure next week as they reach agreement on reconciliation "We just have some of the last decisions to be made," Pelosi said Sunday, adding that the bill was "bigger than anything we have ever done."Pelosi, who made the comments during an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union," said Democrats were nearing consensus on how to proceed with the reconciliation bill, the 10-year spending plan that is the cornerstone of President Joe Biden's agenda.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi again backed off from bringing up the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill on the House floor in the face of far-left opposition to voting on the legislation before an agreement is reached on a separate social spending bill.

  Far-left Democrats make Nancy Pelosi delay infrastructure bill again © Provided by Washington Examiner

“As you know by now, the House will postpone the vote on the BIF [bipartisan infrastructure framework],” Pelosi told colleagues in a letter Thursday night. “The good news is that most Members who were not prepared for a yes vote today have expressed their commitment to support the BIF.”

House Democratic leadership had hoped to vote on the infrastructure bill, which has already passed the Senate with bipartisan support, this week before President Joe Biden left for a G-20 summit of leaders of the world’s wealthiest nations and the COP26, a United Nations climate change conference. There was also an Oct. 31 expiration deadline for some highway transportation funding programs that would be funded in the bipartisan bill.

Democrats squabble, scramble to meet self-imposed deadline. Why this week is vital for Biden.

  Democrats squabble, scramble to meet self-imposed deadline. Why this week is vital for Biden. Democrats still differ over what to strip out of Biden's budget bill, which is likely to be much smaller than the initial $3.5 trillion Biden pitched.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., earlier this month, set a new deadline of Oct. 31 for the House to pass a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill and achieve consensus on a bigger budget bill that includes a number of liberal policies like subsidizing child care and fighting climate change.   .

President Joe Biden traveled to Capitol Hill to speak with House Democrats on Thursday to sell a $1.75 trillion spending bill framework, down from an original $3.5 trillion price tag.

PELOSI TRIES TO PUSH PASSAGE OF INFRASTRUCTURE BILL OVER FINISH LINE DESPITE DEMOCRATIC GRUMBLING

Pelosi reportedly told Democrats in a caucus meeting on Thursday that she wanted to pass the infrastructure bill before Biden landed in Rome on Thursday. She told reporters that she wanted to bring the bill up in a “timely fashion” but ignored a question on whether she would bring a bill for a vote on Thursday.

“Let's do it in a timely fashion,” Pelosi told reporters. “Let's not just keep having postponements and leaving any doubt as to when this will happen.”

Weary Dems keep reliving Infrastructure Week

  Weary Dems keep reliving Infrastructure Week It's a nightmare on Capitol Hill for the president's party, as October passes by without a deal.For the second time in less than a month, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her leadership team had to delay a vote on Senate-passed infrastructure bill amid progressive opposition, denying President Joe Biden a much-need win as Democrats’ bigger, $1.75 trillion social spending plan also remains in limbo.

But members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, led by Washington Democratic Rep. Pramilla Jayapal, have long said that they would not vote for the infrastructure bill until the Build Back Better Act spending bill gets a vote in the Senate or that the two bills get back-to-back votes in the House.

Pelosi was unable to convince progressives. In today’s razor-thin majority, she has only three Democratic votes to spare before needing support from House Republicans, who are whipping against the bill.

“I have signaled for days that you simply did not have the votes for the bipartisan bill without the other bill, the Build Beck Better Act, which has 85% of the President's agenda that we really care deeply about,” Jayapal told CNN on Thursday.

Key hurdles to Pelosi and Biden securing support from progressives is that the legislation text, though some of it was released on Thursday, is far from complete; and disagreements among senators about what should be in the legislation remain.

Confrontations, chaos, confusion: How Biden's agenda stalled yet again

  Confrontations, chaos, confusion: How Biden's agenda stalled yet again It started when a top House progressive and the White House chief of staff got on the phone. It ended with sheer Democratic frustration.As Biden prepared for the high-stakes meeting with House Democrats on Thursday, Jayapal made an urgent plea on a call with White House chief of staff Ron Klain: Don’t send the president to pressure liberals to vote Thursday on the Senate’s infrastructure bill without a more progressive social spending bill that’s fully done.

Democrats aim to pass through a special reconciliation process that bypasses the need to gain any Republican support in the Senate, but Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin have been key Democratic holdouts on the bill, and it can’t pass with both of their support.

Instead of the infrastructure bill, the House on Thursday passed a temporary extension of the highway programs funding until Dec. 3.

The situation mirrored that of a month ago when Pelosi had put a vote on the infrastructure bill on the calendar but then delayed it in a late-night vote. Biden came to the Capitol to meet with the House Democratic Caucus the next day, and then members passed an extension of the highway programs until Oct. 31, buying them time to work on the reconciliation bill.

Since then, centrist and progressive Democrats in the House and Senate have engaged in much more productive negotiations, and the progressives have agreed to support the $1.75 trillion framework despite initially demanding a $3.5 trillion package.

“I feel very, very positive. We are so much further than we were three-and-a-half weeks ago,” Jayapal told the press pool Thursday evening.

The moment has come for Biden and Pelosi to close the deal on his sweeping agenda

  The moment has come for Biden and Pelosi to close the deal on his sweeping agenda In the wake of jarring election results in several states on Tuesday, the one thing Democrats appeared to agree on was that they needed action in Congress. © Al Drago/Reuters U.S. President Joe Biden is escorted by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) as he arrives to speak with the House Democratic Caucus to provide an update on the Build Back Better agenda and the bipartisan infrastructure deal at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., October 28, 2021. Democrats needed wins. Democrats, in at least some form, needed to pass President Joe Biden's sweeping agenda.

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The progressives’ firm stance and forced delays have frustrated some Democrats, though.

“It’s very disappointing,” centrist California Rep. Jim Costa told the hill press pool. “Not to trust the president of the United States and the speaker says a lot about the individuals who decided that ... their own agenda was more important than our working together.”

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Tags: News, Congress, Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden, Infrastructure

Original Author: Emily Brooks

Original Location: Far-left Democrats make Nancy Pelosi delay infrastructure bill again

Kevin McCarthy Faces Republican Attacks After Failing to Stop Infrastructure Bill's Passage .
Last week, he said he would "expect few, if any, to vote for it, if it comes to the floor today." On Friday, 13 GOP House members did.The bill wouldn't have passed were it not for the 13 Republicans who voted in favor of the infrastructure plan. That made critics in the GOP question McCarthy's ability to lead the party in the future.

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