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Politics: Members of hacking group sentenced for stealing millions in cryptocurrency

Man accused of threatening Congress sentenced to 19 months in prison

  Man accused of threatening Congress sentenced to 19 months in prison A 37-year-old Trump supporter was sentenced to 19 months in prison on Monday for threatening to assault and "slaughter" members of Congress shortly after the deadly Jan. 6 attack.Two days after the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, Brendan Hunt of Queens, New York, uploaded a video titled "KILL YOUR SENATORS" onto the video-sharing site BitChute, according to the Department of Justice (DOJ). Hunt was found to be guilty in April.In the video, Hunt toldTwo days after the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, Brendan Hunt of Queens, New York, uploaded a video titled "KILL YOUR SENATORS" onto the video-sharing site BitChute, according to the Department of Justice (DOJ). Hunt was found to be guilty in April.

More than 0 million was stolen in what is likely to be one of the biggest cryptocurrency thefts ever. Hackers exploited a vulnerability in Poly Network, a platform that looks to connect different blockchains so that they can work together. Once the hackers stole the money, they began to send it to various other cryptocurrency addresses. Researchers at security company SlowMist said a total of more than 0 million worth of cryptocurrency was transferred to three addresses. SlowMist said in a tweet that its researchers had "grasped the attacker's mailbox, IP, and device fingerprints" and are

Washington (CNN Business) Hackers have stolen some 0 million in cryptocurrency from the decentralized finance platform Poly Network, in what it says is the largest theft in the industry's history. A vulnerability in Poly Network allowed the thief to make off with the funds, the platform "The money you stole are from tens of thousands of crypto community members you should talk to us to work out a solution." Poly Network urged other members of the cryptocurrency ecosystem to "blacklist" the assets coming from addresses used by the attacker to siphon away the funds — which included a mix

The Justice Department on Tuesday announced the sentencing of the last member of an international hacking group indicted for allegedly stealing millions in cryptocurrency as part of a "SIM hijacking" effort.

a hand holding a coin: Visual representation of bitcoin cryptocurrency © Getty Images Visual representation of bitcoin cryptocurrency

Missouri-based Garrett Endicott, the sixth and final member of a hacking group known as "The Community," was sentenced Monday to 10 months in prison and ordered to pay a fine of over $120,000 for his part in the cryptocurrency scheme.

The scheme, which members of The Community were indicted in connection with in 2019, involved the hackers using "SIM hijacking" to take control of the victim's phone number and rerouting calls and texts to their own devices. This then enabled the group members to individually steal between $50,000 and $9 million in total from victims across the United States through gaining access to email and cryptocurrency accounts on the victims' phones.

A man prosecutors called 'a Nazi sympathizer' was sentenced to 19 months in prison for threatening AOC, Nancy Pelosi, and Chuck Schumer

  A man prosecutors called 'a Nazi sympathizer' was sentenced to 19 months in prison for threatening AOC, Nancy Pelosi, and Chuck Schumer Prosecutors said Brendan Hunt's calls to violence were "chilling" and that he wanted former President Donald Trump to declare martial law.Brendan Hunt, 37, was sentenced for "threatening to assault and murder members of the United States Congress to impede, interfere with and intimidate those members and to retaliate against them on account of their performance of their official duties," the Justice Department said.

Six alleged members of "The Community" were indicted, along with three phone service employees who allegedly helped target subscribers. Six people have been indicted for allegedly being SIM card swappers who stole victims’ identities and their cryptocurrency , and three mobile phone company employees have been indicted for allegedly accepting bribes to help them steal subscribers’ identities. On Thursday, federal prosecutors in the US Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Michigan said that the six alleged hackers are part of a hacking gang called “The Community.”

Google explains how you can avoid viruses and malware on your computer.

Individual victims of the hijacking effort lost between $2,000 and $5 million.

"The actions of these defendants resulted in the loss of millions of dollars to the victims, some of whom lost their entire retirement savings," Acting U.S. Attorney Saima Mohsin for the Eastern District of Michigan said in a statement Tuesday. "This case should serve as a reminder to all of us to protect our personal and financial information from those who seek to steal it."

Endicott was given a light sentence in comparison to other members of The Community who have already stood trial, with Endicott and three others being sentenced in the Eastern District of Michigan.

Florida resident Ricky Handschumacher was sentenced to four years in prison and fined over $7.6 million; Iowa resident Colton Jurisic is serving 42 months in prison and was ordered to pay over $9.5 million; and South Carolina resident Reyad Gafar Abbas was sentenced to two years in prison and fined over $310,000.

Warren urges Yellen to crack down on cryptocurrency

  Warren urges Yellen to crack down on cryptocurrency Warren said "cryptocurrencies currently touch or can ripple through nearly every corner of the financial system."Warren told Yellen in a letter released Tuesday that she should tap the Financial Stability Oversight Council — a panel of top regulators that the Treasury secretary chairs — to "act with urgency.

Hacking Group Behind GozNym Banking Malware Sentenced for Stealing Nearly 0 Million from Thousands of People. Three members of an international organized cybercrime group that was behind a multi- million dollar theft primarily against U.S. businesses and financial institutions have been sentenced to prison, the U.S. Justice Department announced. The criminals used the GozNym banking Trojan to break into more than 4,000 victim computers globally, primarily in the United States and Europe, between 2015 and 2016, and fraudulently steal nearly 0 million from their banking

Prosecutors say that the group allegedly managed to steal cryptocurrency from their victims estimated to be worth ,416,352. Seven attacks were performed to law enforcement's knowledge. While the main members of The Community performed the SIM hijacking attacks, the three former staff members of unnamed In November, a 21-year-old was accused of performing a SIM hijacking attack to steal million in cryptocurrency from a San Francisco resident. While another SIM-swapper was recently sentenced to 10 years in prison for stealing million from his victims, as a novel way of

Irish citizen Conor Freedman was previously sentenced to three years in prison by an Irish court, while Connecticut resident Ryan Stevenson was sentenced to probation, with both ordered to pay some form of restitution.

"The illegal activities of The Community were thwarted as the result of a complex international cryptocurrency and identity theft investigation," Acting Special Agent in Charge James Harris of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations Detroit said in a statement Tuesday.

"As criminal organizations commonly use web-based schemes to further their illicit activities, this demonstrates how vulnerable our personal information can be, and the damage that can ensue when our information falls into the wrong hands," Harris said.

Cryptocurrency schemes have increased as the use of Bitcoin has become more popular. Google in October announced that it had disrupted a scheme by Russian-speaking hackers to target YouTube users in a cryptocurrency scam effort, while cryptocurrency virtual exchanges have been the target of recent sanctions by the Treasury Department due to their use by hackers to facilitate ransomware attack victim payments.

Hillicon Valley — State Dept. employees targets of spyware .
Today is Friday. Welcome to Hillicon Valley, detailing all you need to know about tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. Subscribe here: thehill.com/newsletter-signup.Follow The Hill's cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech team, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@millsrodrigo) and Rebecca Klar (@rebeccaklar_), for more coverage.Ladies and gentlemen the weekend! But before we get there, news broke today that the phones of almost a dozen State Department employees were targeted and hacked by spyware from embattled company NSO Group, which was recently blacklisted by the Commerce Department.

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