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Politics: Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks

Appeals court rejects Turkey's attempt to dismiss suit in attack on DC protesters

  Appeals court rejects Turkey's attempt to dismiss suit in attack on DC protesters A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. rejected an attempt by the government of Turkey to dismiss a lawsuit by protesters who were violently attacked by Turkish security officers in May 2017 during a visit by - and within view of - Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in the nation's capital.A three-judge panel of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday unanimously decided to allow the lawsuit on behalf of the victims to move forward, affirming the district court's decision from February of last year that Turkey is not entitled to immunity under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act.

A tie vote by a federal appeals court Friday left intact a Trump-era ban on "bump stock" devices that modify semi-automatic rifles to fire more rapidly.

Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks © The Hill Bump stock ban remains intact after appeals court deadlocks

The 8-8 vote by the Cincinnati-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit affirmed the ruling of a lower court judge who upheld the federal ban in 2019.

The Trump administration outlawed the devices after a gunman in Las Vegas in 2017 used the rapid-fire accessory to kill 58 people and wound hundreds in the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.

The court sided with the administration's argument that the ban falls within the scope of authority Congress gave federal agencies to regulate machine guns.

It was not clear if the challengers, led by the group Gun Owners of America, would seek relief in the Supreme Court and their lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Supreme Court last year declined to take up a separate legal effort by gun rights advocates to overturn the bump stock ban.

Appeals court ruling against Trump Jan. 6 case tees up likely Supreme Court test .
An appeals court ruling this week that dealt another blow to former President Trump's efforts to shield White House records from the House Jan. 6 Select Committee has laid the ground for a Supreme Court test on the former presidents' authority to invoke executive privilege. Trump is likely to ask the Supreme Court to review the D.C. Circuit decision that found he had failed to put forth a valid argument for why the judiciary should interfere with the executive branch's decision to cooperate with a congressional investigation.

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