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Politics: Chuck Schumer Plans to Show Joe Manchin, Kyrsten Sinema Why to Change Filibuster Rules

Manchin floats modest Senate rules changes

  Manchin floats modest Senate rules changes Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) on Tuesday night floated smaller changes to the Senate rules that would stop short of the filibuster reforms being pushed for by many of his Democratic colleagues.Manchin, coming out of a meeting with Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and other Democrats involved in the negotiations, didn't pledge to vote for any specific rules reforms but appeared open to smaller changes."I think the filibuster needs to stay in place, any way shape or form that we can do it," Manchin said, asked about keeping the current rule that requires most legislation to get 60 votes to advance through the Senate.

Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) publicly refusing to end the filibuster . He added they are having “constant discussions” and pushing to get the two senators on board. “We’re actively discussing potential changes in the rules that hopefully can get all 50 of us there. Do I want to dilute people and think it’s easy or almost there? No. It’s an uphill fight, but we’re constantly at it,” he continued. “ Manchin and Sinema are still talking to us, all of us, on a very regular and tense basis, and we are going to keep fighting and pushing in hopes that we can get this done.

Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer called out centrists Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema by name last night, after Joe Biden urged Democrats to change the filibuster to clear the way for a voting rights bill. “I don’t want to delude your listeners, this is an uphill fight,” Schumer said at an event with Manchin indicated yesterday that he still wants bipartisan support for any rule changes , which seems virtually impossible given Republicans’ unified opposition to filibuster reform. And given the 50-50 split in the Senate, Schumer cannot move forward unless he has the support of every Democratic senator.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has outlined his plans to advance voting rights legislation, possibly setting up a showdown over the chamber's filibuster.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a memorial service for former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. The same day he laid out his plans to bring up voting rights legislation that could set up a change to the Senate filibuster. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a memorial service for former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Wednesday. The same day he laid out his plans to bring up voting rights legislation that could set up a change to the Senate filibuster.

A memo sent by Schumer to Senate Democrats Wednesday lays out how he plans to sidestep procedures that have been used by Republicans to block consideration of voting rights legislation. The Senate requires 60 votes to initiate debate on most bills, which has been a stumbling block for Democrats as they've sought to advance voting rights legislation in the evenly divided chamber.

Kyrsten Sinema’s opposition to filibuster reform rests on a myth

  Kyrsten Sinema’s opposition to filibuster reform rests on a myth Senate rules are fostering obstruction — not bipartisanship.As Norm Ornstein, a political scientist at the American Enterprise Institute, has emphasized, however, the belief that the filibuster fuels bipartisanship is one of many myths about the rule. The filibuster requires most bills to get 60 votes in order to proceed in the Senate, but it’s often used as a tool to obstruct legislation, not foster it.

Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer called out centrists Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema for opposing filibuster reform. “I don’t want to delude your listeners, this is an uphill fight,” Schumer said last night, at an event with the liberal think tank Center for American Progress. “Because Manchin and Sinema do not believe in changing the rules .” Joe Biden will attend Senate Democrats’ caucus lunch tomorrow to discuss voting rights and filibuster reform. The news comes one day after the president called on Senate Democrats to change chamber rules to allow voting rights bills to advance.

Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer says fellow Democrats are telling Sen. Joe Manchin their own seats and party majority are at risk if the Senate doesn't change its filibuster rules so they can pass voting rights legislation. Schumer revealed the appeals to party and self interest Wednesday hours Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) in an effort to get her behind changes to the filibuster . Both have been holding out and standing by their opposition to ending it. 'This is too important to just concede,' Schumer told MSNBC's ' Morning Joe .' 'We are working there are constant meetings and not just

Schumer plans to get around the 60-vote requirement by considering the legislation as a "message," according to the memo, obtained by The Hill. Although the bill will still need to clear the 60-vote threshold before it can pass, Schumer said the maneuver will at least overcome the GOP's lockstep opposition and allow the Senate to begin debate. Schumer's office did not respond to a request for comment from Newsweek Wednesday evening.

"With this procedure, we will finally have an opportunity to debate voting rights legislation – something that Republicans have thus far denied," Schumer said in the memo.

Democrats have been seeking to pass two bills: the John Lewis Voting Rights Act and the Freedom to Vote Act, of which proponents say are needed to counter restrictive measures passed or being considered by GOP-led legislatures following the 2020 election.

Manchin and Sinema Must Face 'Consequences' for Stalling Voting Rights, Democratic Rep Says

  Manchin and Sinema Must Face 'Consequences' for Stalling Voting Rights, Democratic Rep Says Representative Adriano Espaillat said "much must be done to push these two senators to line up and be in lock-step with our leadership."This week, Manchin and Sinema reiterated their support for the Senate filibuster—a rule that Biden and other Democrats want to change in order to pass voting rights bills—delivering a major setback for the president's agenda. The filibuster requires lawmakers in the Senate to reach a 60-vote threshold to advance legislation. The Democratic majority only holds 50 seats in the chamber.

Schumer accused Republicans of warping supermajority requirements and of 'weaponization' of rules meant to protect the rights of the minority. The GOP has been filibustering Democratic-backed election reform legislation. Some Democrats are pushing for a 'carve-out' for legislation dealing with the vote. He did not mention that two influential Democrats, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema have remained opposed to changes in the chamber's filibuster rules . Both back a compromise election reform package that Republicans are filibustering . Democrats tried to bring their legislation

Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) outlined changes to the Senate’s filibuster rules that he would support, but remained steadfast in his opposition to getting rid of the filibuster entirely in comments to congressional reporters on Tuesday. Manchin ’s comments come as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (N.Y.) reiterated his commitment to hold another vote as early Still, Senate Democrats need Manchin ’s and Sinema ’s support to change the rules without Republican support, something Manchin said he still does not back at the moment. Schumer promises that he will push for rules changes before the Jan.

However, Democratic Senators Joe Manchin, of West Virginia, and Kyrsten Sinema, of Arizona, have opposed changing the filibuster, warning their fellow Democrats they could regret the move if and when Republicans retake the chamber.

Schumer said in the memo that starting a floor debate "sets up a process in which Senators can finally make clear to the American people where they stand on protecting our democracy and preserving the right of every eligible American to cast a ballot," according to The Washington Post.

During an appearance on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Schumer said he still hadn't won over the two moderates. But he added that "this is too important to concede," and that other Senate Democrats have continued to press the holdouts, arguing the country's democracy is at stake.

"Do I want to delude people? Do I want people to think we're almost there? No. It's an uphill fight," he said.

Senate Democrats call special caucus meeting ahead of filibuster fight

  Senate Democrats call special caucus meeting ahead of filibuster fight Senate Democrats are convening a special, in-person caucus meeting on Tuesday as they brace for a fight on voting rights and the filibuster to come to a head.Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) has called the meeting for 5 p.m. on Tuesday, a source confirmed to The Hill. Unlike most of the caucus meetings in the wake of the rise of the omicron coronavirus variant, the meeting will be in person. The meeting comes as the Senate is expected to formally start debate on Tuesday on voting legislation that combines the Freedom to Vote Act, which would overhaul federal elections and campaign finance laws, and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which strengthens and

Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, have tried to warn their party off changes to the Senate rules , arguing that if and when Republicans take majority control of the chamber they can then use the lower voting threshold to advance bills Democrats strongly oppose. Mike Lee of Utah, argued on Monday that ending the filibuster would turn the Senate into a “Lord of the Flies"-style institution where majority rules , no matter what. “It is absurd and dangerous to the institution itself,” said Lee in a statement. He said Schumer and his “disastrous plan ” must be stopped.

Manchin's office did not respond to a request for comment from Newsweek Wednesday evening.

Sinema's office responded with an email reiterating her "strong support" for both pieces of voting rights legislation. But Sinema again raised concerns that removing the filibuster could mean a future GOP-controlled Senate could easily enact voting restrictions.

The GOP's lockstep opposition has renewed calls to rework or end the filibuster. Notably, President Joe Biden said in a speech in Atlanta on Tuesday that the Senate should "stand against voter suppression" and end the filibuster.

Schumer has previously said the Senate will debate rule changes by Jan. 17, Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

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Sinema censured by Arizona Democrats for blocking voting rights legislation .
The Arizona Democratic Party's executive board announced Saturday that it formally censured Arizona Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema for voting to maintain the Senate's filibuster rules, effectively blocking Democrats' voting legislation that is a key priority for the party. © Senate TV The symbolic gesture Saturday from Arizona Democrats adds to the mounting pressure Sinema is facing from those in her state who helped her flip a Senate seat in 2018. Sinema -- who started her political career as a progressive -- has been a target on the left during Biden's administration for her stances. Sinema and Sen.

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