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Politics: College Student Group Un-PAC Organizes Nationwide Hunger Strike in Defense of Voting Rights

Biden to amp up the pressure on the Senate to change filibuster rules for voting rights during Atlanta speech

  Biden to amp up the pressure on the Senate to change filibuster rules for voting rights during Atlanta speech President Joe Biden is traveling to Atlanta on Tuesday to deliver a major speech on voting rights, looking to turn up the heat on reluctant senators as Democrats face pressure to pass two pieces of pending legislation opposed by nearly all Republicans on Capitol Hill. © DREW ANGERER/POOL/AFP via Getty Images US President Joe Biden speaks at the US Capitol on January 6, 2022, to mark the anniversary of the attack on the Capitol in Washington, DC. - Thousands of supporters of then-president Donald Trump stormed the Capitol on January 6, 2021, in a bid to prevent the certification of Biden's election victory.

A liberal college student group is threatening to go on hunger strike if Democratic voting reforms do not pass Congress before Jan. 17, the Washington Examiner reported on Tuesday. The group , Un - PAC , is a nonpartisan political action committee focused on passing the expansive Freedom to Vote Act. ''And election day would be a federal holiday.'' With growing concerns that Democrats are sidelining the legislation, the group is mobilizing '' nationwide hunger - striking '' to pressure the party. Un - PAC previously underwent a 15-day strike in December, which ended with President Joe Biden

A liberal college student group is threatening to go on a hunger strike if Democratic voting reforms do not pass Congress before Jan. 17, the Washington Examiner reported on Tuesday. The group , Un - PAC , is a nonpartisan political action committee focused on passing the expansive Freedom to Vote Act. ''And election day would be a federal holiday.'' With growing concerns that Democrats are sidelining the legislation, the group is mobilizing '' nationwide hunger - striking '' to pressure the party. Un - PAC previously underwent a 15-day strike in December, which ended with President Joe Biden

The college student-run advocacy group Un-PAC is planning to restart its Washington, D.C., hunger strike on Thursday in support of voting rights legislation getting passed.

As the battle to pass voting rights legislation heats up, the advocacy group Un-PAC plans to once again take up a hunger strike in an effort to urge President Joe Biden and Congress to get the Freedom to Vote Act passed. Here, Un-PAC co-founder and national organizing director Joseline Garcia speaks to hunger strike participants outside of the White House during the group's previous demonstration. © Leigh Vogel/Getty As the battle to pass voting rights legislation heats up, the advocacy group Un-PAC plans to once again take up a hunger strike in an effort to urge President Joe Biden and Congress to get the Freedom to Vote Act passed. Here, Un-PAC co-founder and national organizing director Joseline Garcia speaks to hunger strike participants outside of the White House during the group's previous demonstration.

The hunger strike is being rebooted in an effort to get Congress to pass the Freedom to Vote Act by Jan. 17, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The act would work to roll back a slate of restrictive voter laws passed in a number of states by thwarting voter suppression and ending partisan gerrymandering,

Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle

  Analysis: Joe Biden puts it all on the line in voting rights battle It took a year for Joe Biden to make an irrevocable bet that puts the credibility of his presidency on the line. If his bid now to change Senate rules to pass voting rights legislation fails, he'll lose more than just the bills he sees as vital to saving democracy. His drained political capital could spell the end of the entire domestic, legislative phase of his administration. © Patrick Semansky/AP President Joe Biden speaks in support of changing the Senate filibuster rules that have stalled voting rights legislation, at Atlanta University Center Consortium, on the grounds of Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, Tuesday, Jan.

College students in Arizona are reportedly considering going on a second hunger strike in a desperate push to make Congress pass the leftist “Freedom to Vote Act.” A student at Arizona State (which I also attend) told Fox News in an interview that her organization , Un - PAC , is considering Although the goal of Un - PAC is to have students nationwide participate in the movement, the passion in Arizona arguably stems from disdain toward Sinema. Sinema supports progressive election reforms, but she is against scrapping the filibuster so Democrats can ram through the legislation with under 60

“ Nationwide hunger - striking , more than likely,” she noted. The Un - PAC students are advocating for the Freedom to Vote Act, which aims to take money out of politics, establish more lenient voting rules and make Election Day a federal holiday. Un - PAC ’s previous hunger strike began at the Arizona Capitol, but the group later traveled to Washington, D.C. to get President Biden’s attention. They ended the campaign after Biden announced that he would prioritize passage of the Freedom to Vote Act.

While President Joe Biden has urged Congress to pass the Freedom to Vote Act as soon as possible, the GOP's use of the filibuster, a longstanding debate aimed at delaying a vote on legislation, will likely make that prospect an uphill battle. This remains the case even as the bill sees strong support from Democratic senators, as well as pressure from the president to abolish the filibuster.

As a result, Un-PAC is moving forward with a hunger strike that took to the streets of Washington, D.C., at the beginning of December. Members of the group met with conservative Democratic Senator Kyrsten Sinema, and they ended their hunger strike when Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer pledged that a vote on the act would come by Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a sentiment that was echoed by Biden.

Protecting voting rights isn’t enough to save democracy

  Protecting voting rights isn’t enough to save democracy Election law expert Richard L. Hasen on the problem of election subversion — and what can be done to stop it.The rejection of the legitimacy of the 2020 election by many Republicans has fueled widespread, state-level voter suppression campaigns and a growing effort to subvert America’s election system.

Arizona college students threatened to go on a second hunger strike if Congress doesn’t pass the Democrat-led voting legislation by Jan. The article goes on to state the following: She said the next hunger strike will be “a lot bigger” than the 15-day one organized in December. “ Nationwide hunger - striking , more than likely,” Winbury said. The group traveled to Washington, DC back in December, but the protest ended when Biden pledged to prioritize the Freedom to Vote Act’s passage.

“ Nationwide hunger - striking , more than likely,” she noted. The bill repeatedly stalled in Congress in 2021 and doesn’t appear to have the support needed to pass by the students ’ deadline. Democrats have argued the legislation would protect access to voting , while Republicans have said it would open elections to fraud. “The bill, if it were enacted, would implement same day and automatic voter registration in all 50 states, as well as mandated polling locations on every college campus,” Un - PAC co-founder Shana Gallagher told Fox News Digital.

However, as the battle to abolish the filibuster and pass the Freedom to Vote Act heats up, Un-PAC declared that they would once again take up their hunger strike.

"Protecting our democracy is NOT a partisan issue, and ALL of our voting rights are under attack by dark money and a broken, outdated voting system," Un-PAC stated on its website. "Conservatives, independents, moderates, liberals, and progressives are coming together to plead for federal intervention. President Biden and the US Senate must prioritize saving our democracy and passing the Freedom To Vote Act this year."

This concern for getting the act passed seems to be paralleled by many liberals across the country, including some Democratic politicians. Notably, voting rights activist and former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams chose to skip a speech on the subject that was given by President Biden on Tuesday.

King family to rally in Arizona for voting bills for MLK Day

  King family to rally in Arizona for voting bills for MLK Day PHOENIX (AP) — As the nation prepares to mark the birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., some members of his family are spending it in conservative-leaning Arizona to mobilize support for languishing federal voting rights legislation. Martin Luther King III; his wife, Arndrea Waters King; and their daughter Yolanda Renee King, 13, will take part Saturday in an on-the-ground campaign for voting rights in Phoenix. They will march with local activists and supporters from Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, a predominantly Black church, and speak about the importance of “no celebration without legislation.

“ Nationwide hunger - striking , more than likely,” she noted. The Un - PAC students are advocating for the Freedom to Vote Act, which aims to take money out of politics, establish more lenient voting rules and make Election Day a federal holiday. Democrats have argued the legislation would protect access to voting , while Republicans have said it would open elections to fraud. “The bill, if it were enacted, would implement same day and automatic voter registration in all 50 states, as well as mandated polling locations on every college campus,” Un - PAC co-founder Shana Gallagher told Fox

A number of voting rights activism groups also boycotted the speech, with one coalition in Georgia calling the president's speech an unnecessary "photo op."

As some Democrats begin to show their frustration with the roadblocks seen by the bill, Un-PAC's hunger strike looks primed to get underway, and it could be for the long haul. An Un-PAC spokesperson told Newsweek that the group's hunger strike will be "indefinite" until the Freedom to Vote Act is passed.

Additionally, the group provided Newsweek with a message that it had for senators: "The overwhelming majority of Americans agree that we should get dark money out of politics, ban partisan gerrymandering, and protect our freedom to vote, and we cannot let the broken filibuster, which was not a part of the original Constitution and has been changed over 160 times in US history, stand in the way of that."

"We are restarting our Hunger Strike for Democracy to plead that our Senators share our sense of urgency and pass the Freedom To Vote Act, before it's too late. Our futures hang in the balance of their decision, and our Senators have a responsibility to represent their constituents and pass this legislation, rather than be skewed by the broken, partisan divide in the US Senate," the statement continued.

A filibuster almost derailed MLK day, too

  A filibuster almost derailed MLK day, too As the US grapples, again and again, with voting rights and civil rights, the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday has again become political. © Horace Cort/AP Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shakes his fist during a speech in Selma, Ala., Feb. 12, 1965. King was engaged in a battle with Sheriff Jim Clark over voting rights and voter registration in Selma. (AP Photo/Horace Cort) Heirs to King argued Americans should not celebrate the national holiday without passage of a new federal voting rights standard that is stalled in the Senate.

Hunger strikes have often been used by activist groups in the past to generate awareness on a variety of issues, and Un-PAC does not appear to be alone.

At least two dozen Black pastors began a hunger strike on Monday, The Independent reported, in a similar effort to urge Congress to pass voting rights legislation by the end of the month.

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Voting rights fight shifts back to statehouses as Senate Democrats fail to advance national protections .
Just weeks from the first primaries of the 2022 midterm elections, the fight over voting rights is unfolding again at the state level -- with Republicans in several swing states proposing new measures that would make it harder to vote. © Justin Sullivan/Getty Images North America/Getty Images A view of voting booths at the Santa Clara County registrar of voters office on October 13, 2020 in San Jose, California.

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