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Politics: McConnell responds to backlash over remark about Black voters

McConnell says Biden speech was 'incoherent, incorrect and beneath his office'

  McConnell says Biden speech was 'incoherent, incorrect and beneath his office' Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on Wednesday offered a blistering rebuke of President Biden's speech in Georgia, in which the president pushed for voting rights and changing the legislative filibuster, saying that it was "abandoning rational persuasion for pure demagoguery.""Look, I've known, liked and personally respected Joe Biden for many years. I did not recognize the man at the podium yesterday. The president's rant,"Look, I've known, liked and personally respected Joe Biden for many years. I did not recognize the man at the podium yesterday. ... The president's rant, rant, yesterday was incoherent, incorrect and beneath his office," McConnell said from the Senate floor.

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell has provoked anger after he appeared to imply that African Americans were not Americans in remarks about Black voters . Speaking to reporters after Republicans once again blocked the Democrats’ voting rights legislation, McConnell said: “The concern is misplaced, because if you look at the statistics, African American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans.” Studies suggest that voting restrictions disproportionately obstruct people of colour. Several Democrats called out the comments, which quickly went viral online, with

Being Black doesn’t make you less of an American, no matter what this craven man thinks.” Pastor and activist Talbert Swan quipped that he “can’t qwhite put my finger on” what distinction McConnell might be drawing, tweeting: “I wonder what’s the difference he sees between ‘African-American voters ’ And Malcolm Kenyatta, a Democratic Senate candidate in Pennsylvania, argued that McConnell ’s words were not a slip of the tongue but were instead an accurate reflection of the Republican party’s mindset toward Black voters . “Mitch McConnell ’s comments suggesting African Americans aren’t fully

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell defended his record on civil rights Friday in response to fury on the left after a comment earlier this week about Black voters, with the Kentucky Republican calling the subsequent backlash "offensive and outrageous."

  McConnell responds to backlash over remark about Black voters © Provided by NBC News

McConnell addressed the controversy at a news conference in Kentucky, calling the criticism an “outrageous mischaracterization of my record as a result of leaving one word out inadvertently the other day, which I just now have supplied to you, is deeply offensive.”

The Senate GOP leader sparked an uproar Wednesday while explaining his opposition to Democrats' voting rights legislation.

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US Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell has faced a backlash after footage of him saying that black Americans vote "in just as high a percentage as Americans" went viral. Video: Reuters. Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell has sparked outrage by appearing to refer to African Americans and Americans as two separate groups in comments about Black voters that have since gone viral. The Kentucky Republican was speaking after Republican senators once again blocked Democrats’ voting rights legislation on Capitol Hill on Wednesday evening.

Senate Republican Mitch McConnell suggested black voters aren't Americans during a press conference on Wednesday. McConnell was responding to Latino Rebels correspondent Pablo Manriquez about voters access protections. “Well, the concern is misplaced, because if you look at the statistics, African-American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans,” the Republican leader remarked . The republican's comments immediately stirred up controversy.

"If you look at the statistics, African American voters are voting in just as high a percentage as Americans,” McConnell said at the time, implying that Black voters are not Americans.

On Friday, he said he "inadvertently omitted the word 'almost,’” but then after the news conference ended, he returned to the microphones to correct himself one more time. "The omitted word is 'all,' not 'almost,'" he said. "Sorry."

Following Wednesday's remark, "MitchPlease" began trending on Twitter, with several Democratic lawmakers using the hashtag. Among them was Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, who tweeted a picture of himself in front of the White House and wrote, "African Americans ARE Americans. #MitchPlease."

Charles Booker, a Kentucky Democrat seeking to unseat GOP Sen. Rand Paul in November, tweeted a clip of McConnell's comments and added: "I need you to understand that this is who Mitch McConnell is. Being Black doesn’t make you less of an American, no matter what this craven man thinks."

McConnell on Friday called such criticism "hurtful and offensive, and I think some of the critics know it's totally nonsense."

"I was there for Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' speech, in the audience," and was also present "when President [Lyndon] Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in the Capitol in 1965," McConnell said.

"I have had African American speech writers, schedulers, office managers over the years," he added.

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