Politics: Bipartisan stablecoin legislation pushed back until after congressional recess

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Bipartisan legislation for establishing regulations on certain forms of cryptocurrency known as stablecoins has been pushed back until after Congress returns from its August recess.

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) announced on Wednesday that the House Committee on Financial Services would delay its release of legislation establishing regulations for managing stablecoins, a form of cryptocurrency that determines its value in relation to the U.S. dollar or other currencies, until after the August recess.

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"Although the Ranking Member, Secretary Yellen, and I have made considerable progress towards an agreement on the legislation, we are unfortunately not there yet, and will therefore continue our negotiations over the August recess," said Waters, the chairwoman of the Financial Services Committee, in a statement. "It's critical that we continue moving the ball forward on this so we can have a regulatory framework that protects consumers while allowing for responsible innovation. I look forward to coming to an agreement in the near future and marking up bipartisan legislation when we return from recess."

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The committee was expected to advance a bipartisan bill focused on creating guardrails for stablecoins on Wednesday. These include requirements that stablecoin issuers maintain 100% reserves and not lend stablecoins to customers, according to Bloomberg. The rules would also determine the types of assets that can back stablecoins and bar commercial companies from issuing stablecoins.

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Crypto assets have gained additional attention in recent months from lawmakers after multiple cryptocurrencies dropped in value in May, causing a crypto winter in the marketplace.

The regulations would follow the European Union's newly passed rules regarding the "Wild West" crypto market. These rules forced cryptocurrency companies to get a license and implement customer safeguards in order to sell digital tokens in Europe.

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Tags: Cryptocurrency, News, Maxine Waters, House Financial Services Committee

Original Author: Christopher Hutton

Original Location: Bipartisan stablecoin legislation pushed back until after congressional recess

Bipartisan debate is alive in Washington – outside of the Capitol .
We believe the Senate and House can take their own steps to incentivize debate. First, the Senate should return to old norms for considering legislation. Filibusters, which date back to America’s earliest days, grew more common in the 19th and 20th centuries, prompting the Senate to adopt rules to end debate by “invoking cloture,” which now requires 60 votes. While cloture votes were rare for most of our history, the assumption in the Senate now is that virtually all legislation will require a cloture vote, giving Senate minorities enormous power to block action.

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