Politics: DOJ issues another subpoena — and thinks J6 Committee has evidence a crime was committed: report

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By Bob Brigham

Cassidy Hutchinson / House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol photo. © provided by RawStory Cassidy Hutchinson / House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol photo.

The Department of Justice has issued a subpoena to obtain documents secured by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol, The New York Times reported Wednesday.

"Federal prosecutors investigating the role that former President Donald J. Trump and his allies played in the events leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol have issued a grand jury subpoena to the National Archives for all the documents the agency provided to a parallel House select committee inquiry," the newspaper reported, saying it had obtained the subpoena. "The subpoena, issued to the National Archives in May, made a sweeping demand for 'all materials, in whatever form' that the archives had given to the Jan. 6 House committee. Those materials included records from the files of Mr. Trump’s top aides, his daily schedule and phone logs and a draft text of the president’s speech that preceded the riot."

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The newspaper reported the subpoena was unrelated to the FBI search of Mar-a-Lago conducted last week.

"Asking the National Archives for any White House documents pertaining to the events surrounding Jan. 6 was one of the first major steps the House panel took in its investigation. And the grand jury subpoena suggests that the Justice Department has not only been following the committee’s lead in pursuing its inquiry, but also that prosecutors believe evidence of a crime may exist in the White House documents the archives turned over to the House panel," the newspaper reported.

The subpoena was signed by veteran federal prosecutor Thomas P. Windom.

"The subpoena was issued to the National Archives around the same time that it became publicly known that the Justice Department was looking beyond the rioters who were present at the Capitol and trying to assess the culpability of people who had helped organize pro-Trump rallies in Washington on Jan. 6," the newspaper reported. "In June, another flurry of subpoenas was issued to state lawmakers and state Republican officials who had taken part in the fake elector scheme. Those subpoenas indicated that the Justice Department was primarily interested in what role pro-Trump lawyers, like Rudolph W. Giuliani and John Eastman, may have played in devising and carrying out the plan."

Read the full report.

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