Technology: Debris of a SpaceX capsule found in a farm in Australia

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  Des débris d’une capsule SpaceX retrouvés dans une ferme en Australie © Copyright 2022, the Obs

when he went to examine debris found in the field of a Jindabyne farm (new southern galls) in the South of Australia, Brad Tucker, an astrophysicist from the National University of Australia, first believed that he was responding to yet another persuaded people - wrongly - to have discovered space debris. But arriving there, the scientist quickly understood that this time, he was in the face of a spatial discovery. The Australian space agency confirmed that these debris came from a SpaceX capsule, reports the Australian media ABC this Wednesday, August 3.

The most imposing debris is a three -meter high object planted vertically in the ground, which can look from a distance to a calcined tree but is in fact made up of light composite materials, including woven carbon fibers, remembers Brad Tucker, Quoted by the " Guardian ". "It was almost like an extraterrestrial obelisk," he explains.

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The scientist hypothesizes that this object, entered the earthly atmosphere around 7 a.m. on July 9, belonged to a capsule of the flight SpaceX Crew-1 of Elon Musk , which left the earth in November 2020. This element of the cargo capsule developed by SpaceX to supply the International Space Station (ISS) is necessary for takeoff but stands out before the return of the capsule on earth.

"It is very rare to see this kind of debris, because they usually do not land on earth but in the ocean," said Brad Tucker. Jock Wallace, a farmer who discovered one of these debris, rejoices that he did not just fall on his house.

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another large neighboring piece reported by a neighbor presented a serial number, which identified the origin of the objects.

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Several experts from the Australian space agency made the trip on Saturday to examine the elements, before a spokesperson confirms that "the debris comes from a SpaceX mission" and the agency "opened a dialogue with Our colleagues in the United States, and with other Commonwealth members and local authorities. ”

The debris, three in number, are the largest pieces found in Australia since 1979.

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Experts expect other debris to be discovered soon. For the time being, they remain in their place of discovery but the director of the Institute of Space of the National University of Australia, Cassanda Steer, recalled that according to international space law, they will have to be returned to the States -Unis and SpaceX if the company claims them.

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