US: What we know about the victims in Colorado Springs: 'Master of Silly Business,' a 'good listener'

5 dead, 25 injured in shooting at LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs: Live updates

  5 dead, 25 injured in shooting at LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs: Live updates Occurred on October 1, 2022 / Springfield, Tennessee, USA: "We drove up to a deer in the road not moving. I got out of the car and petted the deer before it moved."

One victim was a self-described “Master of Silly Business,” a bartender at the night club, another was known for a "heavy hand" pouring drinks to friendly patrons and doling out life advice.

Both were transplants to Colorado from other states.

Family and friends of victims of a mass shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs began to identify and mourn loved ones lost in the tragedy this week. Authorities have not officially confirmed the names of the five people killed and 25 hurt when a gunman opened fire at Club Q just before midnight Saturday, but information is starting to emerge.

Police say LGBTQ club shooter used 'long rifle' and acted alone: What we know about the attacker and Colorado gun laws

  Police say LGBTQ club shooter used 'long rifle' and acted alone: What we know about the attacker and Colorado gun laws El Paso County District Attorney Michael Allen said investigators were looking into whether the attack should be prosecuted as a hate crime. But charges against the suspect “will likely include first-degree murder,” he said.Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning. The shooting rekindled memories of the 2016 massacre at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, that killed 49 people. Colorado has experienced several mass killings, including at Columbine High School in 1999, a movie theater in suburban Denver in 2012, and at a Boulder supermarket last year.

This undated photo provided by Jeff Aston, shows his son Daniel Aston. Daniel Aston was one of five people killed when a gunman opened fire in a nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Nov. 19, 2022. © Courtesy of Jeff Aston via AP This undated photo provided by Jeff Aston, shows his son Daniel Aston. Daniel Aston was one of five people killed when a gunman opened fire in a nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Nov. 19, 2022.

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Here's what we know:

Daniel Davis Aston, 28

Aston was identified by his mother in an interview with the Associated Press. Sabrina Aston said her son grew up in Tulsa and moved to Colorado Springs two years ago.

Aston, a transgender man, was a well-known bartender and entertainer at Club Q, the site of the massacre.

“It’s just a nightmare that you can’t wake up from,” Sabrina Aston said.

His mother told a reporter he had a penchant for entertaining at a young age. He attended Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, and became president of its LGBTQ club.

Colorado Springs community mourns Club Q shooting victims: 'We all feel shock and grief'

  Colorado Springs community mourns Club Q shooting victims: 'We all feel shock and grief' Mourners left flowers and signs in a memorial to the victims after a gunman opened fire in the Colorado Springs, Colorado, club, killing 5 Saturday.Couples holding hands and parents with babies bundled in fleece blankets shuffled along where a makeshift memorial of cellophane-wrapped flowers and handwritten notes had been steadily growing outside the gay and lesbian club since early Sunday.

“We are in shock, we cried for a little bit, but then you go through this phase where you are just kind of numb, and I’m sure it will hit us again,” she said. “I keep thinking it’s a mistake, they made a mistake, and that he is really alive.”

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Derrick Rump, 38

Rump was a bartender at Club Q. His Facebook account listed attending Kutztown Area Senior High School in his native Berks County, Pennsylvania.

The Colorado Springs Gazette reported that Rump was a co-owner of Club-Q.

'WHEN WILL IT STOP?' LGBTQ community, Pulse survivors react to Club Q shooting in Colorado Springs

Anthony Jaramillo, a friend of Rump, told CBS News he was a staple at the bar and often visited friends home in Pennsylvania.

"Loving, supportive, with a heavy hand in his drink pouring, and just a really good listener and would not be afraid to tell you when you were wrong instead of telling you what you wanted to hear and that was really valuable," Jaramillo said.

Mothers, friends, performers among dead at Colorado gay club

  Mothers, friends, performers among dead at Colorado gay club A loving boyfriend. A 28-year-old bartender who loved to perform. A mother visiting from a small town who enjoyed hunting. These are among the victims of the rampage at an LGBTQ club in Colorado Springs that left five people dead and 17 others with gunshot wounds. Club regulars and newcomers — gay and straight, transgender and cisgender — flocked to Club Q over the weekend to dance, enjoy a comedy show or work behind the bar. What began as a typical Saturday evening of dancing and drinking at the preeminent LGBTQ establishment in the conservative-leaning Colorado city south of Denver ended in tragedy when a gunman entered and began spraying bullets before he was tackled and sub

Aaron Ward, a neighbor of Rump, heard news of his death on Monday morning. As Rump often worked late shifts at Club Q, Ward had few interactions with Rump, but remembers him for his kindness.

“I was worried because I hadn’t seen his car in two days,” Ward said. “Someone came over a couple days ago and said they found his phone at the club and they couldn’t find him anywhere... Any time I talked to him or saw him, he was always very nice, very kind, very respectful. What little I knew of him, he was a great guy.”

Contributing: James Bartolo, The Pueblo Chieftain.

You can reach Nick Penzenstadler at [email protected]

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: What we know about the victims in Colorado Springs: 'Master of Silly Business,' a 'good listener'

Club Q suspect and mother accused of verbally attacking airplane passengers with racial slurs months before the Colorado shooting .
"Even my friend was like, we won't be surprised, like, if he's a mass shooter. And it was scary to think that," one passenger told KDVR.In June, President Joe Biden signed into law the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act — the most significant piece of gun legislation to pass in decades. Part of the bill included $750 million in federal funding for states to implement intervention programs such as gun restraining orders, more colloquially known as "red flag laws.

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