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US: Meet USS America: The US Navy Aircraft Carrier The Navy Couldn’t Sink

Crew evacuated as fire breaks out on Russia's only aircraft carrier

  Crew evacuated as fire breaks out on Russia's only aircraft carrier The ill-fated Admiral Kuznetsov was docked in the Zvyozdochka shipyard in Murmansk for repairs when the blaze started on the vessel which has been beset with problems. The fire erupted in the cabins on the port side of the flagship of the Russian navy, which also caught fire in 2019.A source told Russia's TASS news agency: 'There was a fire on board the Admiral Kuznetsov, which is in the dry dock of the Zvyozdochka shipyard.

USS America © Provided by 1945 USS America USS America: The Unsinkable Aircraft Carrier? It was 110 years ago this past April 15 that the unsinkable RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and in less than three hours sank into the frigid waters of the North Atlantic. Several World War II warships earned the distinction of being “unsinkable” as well – most notably the United States Navy’s USS Nevada (BB-36), the battleship that served in two World Wars, survived the attack on Pearl Harbor, and wasn’t even sunk by a nuclear blast! (Subscribe to Our YouTube Channel Here. Check out More 19FortyFive Videos Here) Then there was the USS America (CVA/CV-66), one of three Kitty Hawk-class supercarriers built for the United States Navy in the 1960s. The conventionally powered warship was built at the Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Virginia, and initially commissioned as an attack aircraft carrier. After being commissioned in 1965, she spent most of her career in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, but did make three Pacific deployments during the Vietnam War. In 1975, America was designated as a multi-purpose aircraft carrier CV-66, and in that role, she took part in combat operations in the Persian Gulf during Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Among her later deployments were with the nuclear-powered Nimitz-class carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) as part of Operation Uphold Democracy, the military September 1994 intervention to remove the military regime installed by the 1991 Haitian coup d’état that overthrew the elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Both flattops were deployed with a large contingent of U.S. Army helicopters but no air wings.

A year later, USS America was deployed as part of Operation Deny Flight and Operation Deliberate Force, in association with the UN and NATO, and also took part in missions in support of Operation Southern Watch over Iraq. She then made a port-of-call visit to Valletta, Malta in January 1996, becoming the first U.S. Navy carrier to visit the historical port in nearly a quarter of a century.

Taiwan scrambles jets, readies missile defenses as Chinese military vessels near island, defense ministry says

  Taiwan scrambles jets, readies missile defenses as Chinese military vessels near island, defense ministry says The Taiwanese Defense Ministry said aircraft were sent to respond after detection systems found nearly a dozen Chinese planes and other naval vessels were nearing the island.The Ministry of National Defense for the Taiwan government, officially identified as the Republic of China, said its forces detected over a dozen vehicles operated by China’s military near its island at approximately 6 a.m. Saturday.

Career Cut Short

USS America was originally scheduled to undergo a Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) in 1996 for subsequent retirement in 2010, but with the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the supercarrier fell victim to budget cuts. Her career was cut short, and she was subsequently decommissioned in a ceremony at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia on August 9, 1996.

There had been calls to see her preserved as a museum ship, but she was in bad shape and given the state of the warship, USS America was instead used as a naval target during a classified SinkEx in 2005.

Then-Vice Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John B. Nathman explained, “America will make one final and vital contribution to our national defense, this time as a live-fire test and evaluation platform. America’s legacy will serve as a footprint in the design of future carriers – ships that will protect the sons, daughters, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of America veterans. We will conduct a variety of comprehensive tests above and below the waterline collecting data for use by naval architects and engineers in creating the nation’s future carrier fleet. It is essential we make those ships as highly survivable as possible. When that mission is complete, the America will slip quietly beneath the sea. I know America has a very special place in your hearts, not only for the name, but also for your service aboard her. I ask that you understand why we selected this ship for this one last crucial mission and make note of the critical nature of her final service.” She was the first large aircraft carrier since Operation Crossroads in 1946 to be expended in a weapons test, and she remains the only supercarrier to have been sunk – but it wasn’t exactly easy. She was moved to a position about 250 miles (400 km) southeast of Cape Hattera. Over the course of four weeks beginning in late April 2005, the U.S. Navy tested America with underwater explosives, which were designed to simulate underwater attacks, and monitor from afar via devices placed on the vessel.

While she lacked the armor of past battleships, the supercarrier was significantly larger in size, and was equipped with a double-layered hull. In addition, her internal compartmentalization was far better than the World War II battle wagons. The carrier was simply able to absorb more damage than older warships. The tests helped the U.S. Navy determine how a modern supercarrier would stand up to attack, and what was learned was used to aid in the design of future carriers including the then still-in-development Gerald R. Ford-class.

Why The Incredible XB-70 Valkyrie Was A Tragic Failure

  Why The Incredible XB-70 Valkyrie Was A Tragic Failure The stunning North American XB-70 Valkyrie was a Mach 3 marvel, but its research program was one that ultimately ended in tragedy.It first flew in September 1964, and was set to replace the venerable Boeing B-52 Stratofortress. The B-52 had served the USAF well, but something a bit more advanced was soon needed, and something that was faster too. However, before the first aircraft had even flown, things conspired against the XB-70. The threat of Soviet surface-to-air missiles, or SAMS, meant that even the XB-70s speed could not keep it safe. Then, when a low-level role was ultimately considered, the XB-70 was only marginally better in that role than the B-52.

While not truly “unsinkable,” it was good to know that the America wouldn’t go down so easily – unlike a certain Russia cruiser that recently was so easily sunk in the Black Sea.

Bonus Photo Essay: Meet the Gerald R. Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier

Ford-Class © Provided by 1945 Ford-Class

From 2017 – The aircraft carrier Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) pulls into Naval Station Norfolk for the first time. The first-of-class ship – the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years – spent several days conducting builder’s sea trails, a comprehensive test of many of the ship’s key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Matt Hildreth courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries/Released)

Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier © Provided by 1945 Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier

Ford-Class. Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier USS Ford.

Aircraft Carrier USS Nimitz © Provided by 1945 Aircraft Carrier USS Nimitz

(Mar. 12, 2022) Sailors aboard USS Nimitz (CVN 68) assemble on the flight deck and form a human ‘100’ to commemorate the centennial of the aircraft carrier. On March 20, 1922 the former USS Jupiter (Collier #3) recommissioned as the USS Langley (CV 1), the U. S. Navy’s first aircraft carrier. One hundred years later, Nimitz and Ford-class aircraft carriers are the cornerstone of the Navy’s ability to maintain sea control and project power ashore. Nimitz is the first in its class and the oldest commissioned aircraft carrier afloat., carrying with it a legacy of innovation, evolution and dominance. Nimitz is underway in the 3rd Fleet Area of Operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Elliot Schaudt)

History Has Spoken: USS Missouri Was the Greatest Battleship Ever

  History Has Spoken: USS Missouri Was the Greatest Battleship Ever From Tokyo Bay to the Persian Gulf – USS Missouri Was There – The United States of America officially may have entered the Second World War when President Franklin Roosevelt addressed the United States Congress on December 8, 1941, and asked for a declaration of war on the Empire of Japan – yet it had really begun […]BB-63 was laid down in January 1941 when the clouds of war were on the horizon. The U.S. Navy sought to have a new class of battleships that improved upon the earlier South Dakota -class.

Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier © Provided by 1945 Ford-Class Aircraft Carrier

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 8, 2017) – Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Sailors man the rails as the ship departs Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding for builder’s sea trials off the coast. The first- of-class ship—the first new U.S. aircraft carrier design in 40 years—will spend several days conducting builder’s sea trials, a comprehensive test of many of the ship’s key systems and technologies. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Christopher Delano).

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Now a Senior Editor for 19FortyFive, Peter Suciu is a Michigan-based writer who has contributed to more than four dozen magazines, newspapers and websites. He regularly writes about military hardware, and is the author of several books on military headgear including A Gallery of Military Headdress, which is available on Amazon.com. Peter is also a Contributing Writer for Forbes.

North American F-86 Sabre: Let Us Give You a Tour

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Meet USS America: The US Navy Aircraft Carrier The Navy Couldn’t Sink .
USS America: The Unsinkable Aircraft Carrier? It was 110 years ago this past April 15 that the unsinkable RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and in less than three hours sank into the frigid waters of the North Atlantic. Several World War II warships earned the distinction of being “unsinkable” as well – most notably the United States Navy’s USS Nevada (BB-36), […]There had been calls to see her preserved as a museum ship, but she was in bad shape and given the state of the warship, USS America was instead used as a naval target during a classified SinkEx in 2005.

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