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US: Here's where Confederate statues and memorials have been removed

George Floyd updates: Removal of Confederate statues spreads across country

  George Floyd updates: Removal of Confederate statues spreads across country The death of George Floyd has sparked widespread outrage, anti-racist protests and calls for police reform across the United States and around the world.   require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The Minneapolis Police Department fired all four officers after video of the incident surfaced. The officer who prosecutors say pinned Floyd down for nearly nine minutes, Derek Chauvin, has since been charged with second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Across the country, local and state leaders have been listening to protester's calls to reexamine their controversial relics of the past and current policies on policing.

a statue of a man riding a horse: An inspection crew from the Virginia Department of General Services takes measurements as they inspect the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, June 8, 2020, in Richmond, Va. © Steve Helber/AP An inspection crew from the Virginia Department of General Services takes measurements as they inspect the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, June 8, 2020, in Richmond, Va.

In the last two weeks, locations such as Richmond, Virginia, Jacksonville, Florida and Indianapolis, Indiana, have quickly moved to remove Confederate statues and memorials from public places as demonstrators reignited arguments about the pain the statues have caused. Historians and civil rights groups have long said these statues were put in place to emphasize white supremacy over black people during the late 19th century.

These confederate statues have been removed since George Floyd's death

  These confederate statues have been removed since George Floyd's death The death of George Floyd is leading to the removal -- by protesters in some cases and city leaders in others -- of contentious statues that have riled some residents for decades, if not longer. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25 in Minneapolis. While being arrested, Floyd was held down by a Minneapolis police officer's knee for more than eight minutes. He was pronounced dead shortly after.

MORE: Statues of Confederate figures, slave owners come down amid protests

After the weeks of protests from residents following George Floyd's death, leaders have rethought their stances on the statues and approving their removals.

As of Friday morning, at least seven cities have either removed or approved the removal of Confederate monuments. The most controversial of those memorials, the Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Virginia, is caught up in a legal battle.

a screenshot of text: Confederate Statues Taken Down in the U.S. © ABC News Confederate Statues Taken Down in the U.S.

Corporations and other organizations have also announced they were removing Confederate related items. The University of Alabama said it would remove three Confederate plaques from its campus and create a committee to review buildings that bear the names of Confederate members.

Trump Moves to Halt Bid to Drop Confederate Names From Military Bases

  Trump Moves to Halt Bid to Drop Confederate Names From Military Bases President Trump said his administration wouldn’t consider renaming U.S. Army bases that are named for Confederate officers.“My Administration will not even consider the renaming of these Magnificent and Fabled Military Installations,” Mr. Trump said in a series of tweets. “Our history as the Greatest Nation in the World will not be tampered with.

In some cities, protesters have taken matters into their own hands. People have toppled and defaced Confederate statues in Virginia and Alabama during the protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody.

Some protesters have also taken down and defaced statues of Christopher Columbus and other figures linked to colonialism, slavery and racial violence and disparity in their cities.

a man riding a horse: An inspection crew from the Virginia Department of General Services takes measurements as they inspect the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, June 8, 2020, in Richmond, Va. © Steve Helber/AP An inspection crew from the Virginia Department of General Services takes measurements as they inspect the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, June 8, 2020, in Richmond, Va.

At the same time, police offices and cities have worked to increase transparency between law enforcement and prohibit excessive force.

MORE: Cities across US announce police reform following mass protests against brutality

Minneapolis's city council said it has enough votes to disband its police force, despite opposition from its mayor, and New York's State Legislature approved a bill that would repeal a measure that prevented disclosure of information on officers who were disciplined.

Activists predict that more cities and police forces will enact reforms in response to Floyd's death.

Push to Remove Confederate Statues From Capitol Faces Hurdles .
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi removed from the U.S. Capitol portraits of former speakers who served in the Confederacy, but removing statues of Confederate leaders is proving harder, due to disagreements with Republicans and a law that gives each state control over its two statues. Removing the statues, which include likenesses of leaders of the Confederacy as well as prominent figures who backed it, “is a part of fixing and eliminating those vestiges of systemic racism,” said Rep. Bennie Thompson (D., Miss.), one of the lead sponsors of House legislation seeking to remove them.

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