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US: Oklahoma Judge Blocks Law Banning Abortion at 6 Weeks, Upholds Restrictions on Pill Abortion

The Messy Post-Roe Legal Future Awaiting America

  The Messy Post-Roe Legal Future Awaiting America There’s no clean end to this story.For decades, the anti-abortion movement has argued that Roe and its progeny must be overturned because the legal rules they created—such as the undue-burden standard, viability as a dividing line, and the contours of the health and life exceptions—resulted in inconsistency and were unworkable for the courts. According to this argument, the legal standards are too imprecise, difficult to apply, and unmoored from the Constitution’s text, leading different courts to reach different conclusions. As Justice Antonin Scalia once complained in his dissent in Planned Parenthood v.

An Oklahoma judge temporarily blocked two new abortion laws from taking effect in November, including one that bans the procedure after six weeks of pregnancy, but upheld three others.

While District Judge Cindy Truong blocked two anti-abortion laws, she allowed three others that restrict medication-induced abortions and require doctors who perform abortions to be board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology to move forward, according to the Associated Press. Pictured are anti-abortion activists who try to block the signs of pro-choice activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during the 2018 March for Life January 19, 2018, in Washington, DC. © Alex Wong/Getty Images While District Judge Cindy Truong blocked two anti-abortion laws, she allowed three others that restrict medication-induced abortions and require doctors who perform abortions to be board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology to move forward, according to the Associated Press. Pictured are anti-abortion activists who try to block the signs of pro-choice activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during the 2018 March for Life January 19, 2018, in Washington, DC.

While District Judge Cindy Truong blocked two anti-abortion laws, she allowed three others that restrict medication-induced abortions and require doctors who perform abortions to be board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology to move forward, according to the Associated Press.

DOJ and Texas face off in court over restrictive abortion law

  DOJ and Texas face off in court over restrictive abortion law Lawyers from the Justice Department and the state of Texas faced off in court Friday over a lawsuit challenging the state's restrictive abortion law. It was the first court hearing on the matter and presents the first opportunity for a judge to get abortion rights fully restored in Texas, at least temporarily.

Rabia Muqaddam, a staff attorney for the New York-based Center for Reproductive Rights, which challenged the five new Oklahoma laws said the laws would severely limit access to abortion services.

"The OB-GYN requirement will immediately disqualify more than half of the doctors providing abortions in the state," said Muqaddam. "Every day that law remains in effect, we're talking about really catastrophic fallout."

Restrictions included in the pill abortion bill include requirements such as admitting privileges and ultrasounds that have previously been struck down by the Oklahoma Supreme Court, AP reported.

Clinics in Oklahoma have already been inundated with patients from Texas where abortions have been illegal since September 1 if medical professionals detect a fetal heartbeat.

Arizona law criminalizing abortions sought for genetic abnormalities put on hold by judge

  Arizona law criminalizing abortions sought for genetic abnormalities put on hold by judge The judge's order means people who become pregnant can continue to have abortions due to diagnoses like Down syndrome or cystic fibrosis.The judge's order means people who become pregnant can continue to receive abortions because of diagnoses like Down syndrome or cystic fibrosis, and doctors can provide those services without fearing penalties including prison time. Other provisions of the law were allowed to take effect, however.

In August, 11 women from the state received abortion services at Trust Women clinic in Oklahoma City, but the number increased to 110 in September, according to Rebecca Tong, co-executive director of Trust Women.

Other states like Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana and New Mexico are also reporting similar increases, according to AP.

State Sen. Julie Daniels, a Republican who sponsored the majority of the anti-abortion bills in Oklahoma, said the laws are to make abortions safer but ultimately, she hopes to save the lives of fetuses.

"My goal has always been to save the life of the unborn child and return these decisions to the states where they rightfully belong," Daniels said.

According to a 2019 Associated Press analysis of state and federal data, at least 276,000 women received abortions outside of their home states between 2012 and 2017.

As legislation that limits abortion access continues to pass, the numbers are expected to continue rising.

Abortion, guns, religion: Supreme Court returns to a docket full of explosive cases

  Abortion, guns, religion: Supreme Court returns to a docket full of explosive cases The Supreme Court begins a new term Oct. 4 that may be one of its most significant in years, with major cases pending on abortion, guns and religion.After a busier-than-expected summer break, when the nation's highest court toppled President Joe Biden's eviction moratorium and let stand for now a Texas ban on abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, the court will once again hear in-person oral arguments and hand down formal opinions as it starts another nine-month term.

"Oklahoma clinics were already inundated with patients from both Texas and Oklahoma, and if these laws take effect, many Oklahoma abortion providers won't be able to provide care," said Dr. Alan Braid, the owner of Tulsa Women's Reproductive Clinic, in a statement. Braid was the first doctor to be sued under the new Texas law. "Where will all these patients go? Politicians are trying to trap them, and they are succeeding. But we will not stop fighting these restrictions."

The Center for Reproductive Rights plans to appeal the judge's ruling to the Oklahoma Supreme Court after a formal agreement is reached with the state's attorney's general office, Muqaddam told AP.

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Supreme Court signals willingness to allow Kentucky attorney general to defend state's abortion law .
The case comes to the high court as advocates on both sides of the abortion debate are questioning the court's commitment to its Roe v. Wade decision.Most of the justices Tuesday appeared to be leaning toward allowing Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron to defend a 2018 law banning dilation and evacuation abortions, a procedure commonly performed in the second trimester of pregnancy.

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