US: Native American leaders say Chaco prayers being answered

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CHACO CULTURE NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK, N.M. (AP) — The stillness that enveloped Chaco Canyon was almost deafening, broken only by the sound of a raven's wings batting the air while it circled overhead.

This Nov. 22, 2021 image shows Hopi Vice Chairman Clark Tenakhongva talking about his tribe's connections to Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. Some tribes in the Southwest are celebrating the recent announcement by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland that her agency will begin the process to withdrawal federal land holdings near the park from oil and gas development for 20 years. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press This Nov. 22, 2021 image shows Hopi Vice Chairman Clark Tenakhongva talking about his tribe's connections to Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico. Some tribes in the Southwest are celebrating the recent announcement by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland that her agency will begin the process to withdrawal federal land holdings near the park from oil and gas development for 20 years. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

Then a chorus of leaders from several Native American tribes began to speak, their voices echoing off the nearby sandstone cliffs. They spoke of a deep connection to the canyon — the heart of Chaco Culture National Historic Park — and the importance of ensuring that oil and gas development beyond the park's boundaries does not sever that tie for future generations.

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U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland meets with tribal governors following a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland meets with tribal governors following a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

The Indigenous leaders from the Hopi Tribe in Arizona and several New Mexico pueblos were beyond grateful that the federal government is taking what they believe to be more meaningful steps toward permanent protections for cultural resources in northwestern New Mexico.

U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland listens as Indigenous leaders talk about the need to protect areas beyond the boundaries of Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park for 20 years. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland listens as Indigenous leaders talk about the need to protect areas beyond the boundaries of Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park for 20 years. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

It's a fight they've been waging for years with multiple presidential administrations. They're optimistic the needle is moving now that one of their own — U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland — holds the reins of the federal agency that oversees energy development and tribal affairs.

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Haaland, who is from Laguna Pueblo and is the first Native American to lead a Cabinet agency, joined tribal leaders at Chaco on Monday to celebrate the beginning of a process that aims to withdraw federal land holdings within 10 miles (16 kilometers) of the park boundary, making the area off-limits to oil and gas leasing for 20 years.

New leases on federal land in the area will be halted for the next two years while the withdrawal proposal is considered.

Haaland also committed to taking a broader look at how federal land across the region can be better managed while taking into account environmental effects and cultural preservation.

The perfect weather did not go unnoticed Monday, as tribal leaders talked about their collective prayers being answered.

“It’s a nice day — a beautiful day that our father the sun blessed us with. The creator laid out the groundwork for today,” said Hopi Vice Chairman Clark Tenakhongva.

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A World Heritage site, Chaco is thought to be the center of what was once a hub of Indigenous civilization with many tribes from the Southwest tracing their roots to the high desert outpost.

Within the park, walls of stacked stone jut up from the bottom of the canyon, some perfectly aligned with the seasonal movements of the sun and moon. Circular subterranean rooms called kivas are cut into the desert floor, and archaeologists have found evidence of great roads that stretched across what are now New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado.

Visitors often marvel at the architectural prowess of Chaco’s early residents. But for many Indigenous people in the Southwest, Chaco Canyon holds a more esoteric significance.

FILE - A hiker sits on a ledge above Pueblo Bonito, the largest archeological site at the Chaco Culture National Historical Park, in northwestern New Mexico, Aug. 28, 2021. The U.S. Interior Department says, Monday, Nov. 15,  oil and gas leasing within 10 miles of Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico will be prohibited for the next two years.  (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - A hiker sits on a ledge above Pueblo Bonito, the largest archeological site at the Chaco Culture National Historical Park, in northwestern New Mexico, Aug. 28, 2021. The U.S. Interior Department says, Monday, Nov. 15, oil and gas leasing within 10 miles of Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico will be prohibited for the next two years. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio, File)

The Hopi call it “Yupkoyvi,” simply translated as way beyond the other side of the mountains.

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  Interior head: Chaco protections ‘millennia in the making’ CHACO CULTURE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK, N.M. (AP) — A few big rigs carried oilfield equipment on a winding road near Chaco Culture National Historical Park, cutting through desert badlands and sage. Mobile homes and traditional Navajo dwellings dotted the landscape, with a smattering of natural gas wells visible in the distance. This swath of northwestern New Mexico has been at the center of a decades-long battle over oil and gas development. OnThis swath of northwestern New Mexico has been at the center of a decades-long battle over oil and gas development.

“Whose land do we all occupy? We walk the land of the creator. That’s what was told to us at the beginning — at the bottom of the Grand Canyon,” Tenakhongva said. “Many of us have that connection. Many of us can relate to how important the Grand Canyon is. Ask the Zuni, the Laguna, the Acoma. They made their trip from there to this region. We know the importance of these areas.”

Oilfield trucks drive along the road that leads toward Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Some Navajo allottees posted signs in opposition to a recent announcement by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland that the Biden administration wants to prohibit oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park for 20 years as a way to protect cultural sites in the region. Those in opposition say their livelihoods depend on development. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press Oilfield trucks drive along the road that leads toward Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Some Navajo allottees posted signs in opposition to a recent announcement by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland that the Biden administration wants to prohibit oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park for 20 years as a way to protect cultural sites in the region. Those in opposition say their livelihoods depend on development. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

Pueblo leaders also talked about areas near Zuni Pueblo in western New Mexico and Bears Ears National Monument in Utah that are tied to Chaco civilization.

Laguna Gov. Martin Kowemy Jr. said Chaco is a vital part of who his people are.

“Pueblo people can all relate through song, prayer and pilgrimage,” he said. “Now more than ever, connections to our peoples’ identities are a source of strength in difficult times. We must ensure these connections will not be severed, but remain intact for future generations.”

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Numerous signs are seen placed along the road leading to Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico ahead of a visit by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Some Navajo allottee owners are concerned about a proposal to prohibit oil and gas development on federal land holdings within 10 miles of the park, saying it would have significant financial consequences for them. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press Numerous signs are seen placed along the road leading to Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico ahead of a visit by U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Some Navajo allottee owners are concerned about a proposal to prohibit oil and gas development on federal land holdings within 10 miles of the park, saying it would have significant financial consequences for them. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo said the beliefs, songs, ceremonies and other traditions that have defined generations of Pueblo people originated at Chaco.

Navajo Council Delegate Daniel Tso talks about pollution concerns from oil and gas development near Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Tso said a decision the week before, by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development near the park for 20 years, was a © Provided by Associated Press Navajo Council Delegate Daniel Tso talks about pollution concerns from oil and gas development near Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Tso said a decision the week before, by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development near the park for 20 years, was a "giant step" toward permanent protections for culturally significant sites. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

“Our fight to protect this sacred place is rooted in what our elders teach us and what we know as descendants of those who settled here,” Vallo said. “That is our responsibility — to maintain our connection, our deep-felt obligation and protective stewardship of this sacred place.”

U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland addresses a crowd during a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park's boundaries for 20 years. Some Indigenous leaders were elated with the action, saying it marks a step toward permanent protection of the area outside the park. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland addresses a crowd during a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park's boundaries for 20 years. Some Indigenous leaders were elated with the action, saying it marks a step toward permanent protection of the area outside the park. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

Both the Obama and Trump administrations also put on hold leases adjacent to the park through agency actions, but some tribes, archaeologists and environmentalists have been pushing for permanent protections.

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U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland prepares to answer questions following a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park's boundaries for 20 years. Some Indigenous leaders were elated with the action, saying it marks a step toward permanent protection of the area outside the park. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan) © Provided by Associated Press U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland prepares to answer questions following a celebration at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in northwestern New Mexico on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021. Haaland called the day momentous, referring to recent action taken by the Biden administration to begin the process of withdrawing federal land from oil and gas development within a 10-mile radius of the park's boundaries for 20 years. Some Indigenous leaders were elated with the action, saying it marks a step toward permanent protection of the area outside the park. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)

Congressional legislation is pending, but there has been disagreement over just how big the buffer should be.

The Navajo Nation oversees much of the land that makes up the jurisdictional checkerboard surrounding the national park. Some belong to individual Navajos who were allotted land by the federal government generations ago.

Navajo leaders support preserving parts of the area but have said individual allottees stand to lose an important income source if the land is made off-limits to development. Millions of dollars in royalties are at stake for tribal members who are grappling with poverty and high unemployment rates.

Haaland’s agency has vowed to consult with tribes over the next two years as the withdrawal proposal is considered, but top Navajo leaders already are suggesting they’re being ignored. Noticeably absent from Monday's celebration were the highest elected leaders of the tribe’s legislative and executive branches.

Navajo Nation Council Delegate Daniel Tso has been among a minority within tribal government speaking out against development in the region. He said communities east of Chaco are “under siege” from increased drilling.

He told the story of one resident who wipes dust from his kitchen table only to have it dirty again the next day due to the oilfield traffic. He said the consequences are having negative effects on residents' spirits and thus their ability to remain resilient.

“Yes, we want the landscape protected, we want better air quality, we want to protect the water aquifer, we want to protect the sacred,” he said. “The undisturbed landscape holds much sacredness. It brings peace of mind, it brings a settled heart and it gives good spiritual strength.”

No matter what side they're on, many Navajos feel their voices aren't being heard.

Haaland on Monday invited everyone to participate in the listening sessions that will be held as part of the process, which she has dubbed “Honoring Chaco."

Environmentalists say the region is a prime example of the problems of tribal consultation and that Haaland's effort could mark a shift toward more tribal involvement in future decision-making when it comes to identifying and protecting cultural resources.

“By creating a new collaborative process with ‘Honoring Chaco’ we have the ability to ameliorate broken promises and to right the wrongs of consultation just being a check-the-box exercise,” said Rebecca Sobel with the group WildEarth Guardians. “Hopefully it will be the beginning of a new relationship.”

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