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US: What we know about Frank James, suspect in the Brooklyn subway shooting

Brooklyn subway shooting is not being investigated as terrorism 'at this time.' Here's why.

  Brooklyn subway shooting is not being investigated as terrorism 'at this time.' Here's why. The Brooklyn subway attack renews questions about why crimes like mass shootings aren't immediately categorized as terrorism.But New York officials on Tuesday said they weren't investigating the shooting as terrorism "at this time," renewing questions about why crimes like mass shootings aren't always or immediately categorized as terrorism and how legal definitions don't completely capture the way crimes are experienced by communities.

More information was emerging Wednesday about a series of videos made by the man police say is now a suspect in the Brooklyn subway shooting that left about two dozen people injured.

Frank R. James, 62, was initially a "person of interest in the case." The New York City Police Department on Wednesday confirmed James was now a suspect and that no arrests had been made.

James has ties to Wisconsin and Philadelphia, authorities said. No additional information has been found connecting James to New York City, Mayor Eric Adams told MSNBC on Wednesday morning.

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Person of interest identified in Brooklyn subway train attack that injured about 2 dozen people

  Person of interest identified in Brooklyn subway train attack that injured about 2 dozen people Police identified Frank James, 62, with addresses in Wisconsin and Philadelphia, as a person of interest in Tuesday's chaotic New York City shooting.But authorities stopped short of saying the man they identified, Frank James, 62, was considered a suspect. Police said he was not in custody as of Tuesday night and no charges were filed.

A law enforcement official who was not authorized to comment publicly told USA TODAY that authorities were reviewing several social media pages, including YouTube videos appearing to feature James ranting and threatening violence.

This image provided by the New York City Police Department shows a Crime Stoppers bulletin displaying photos of Frank R. James, who has been identified by police as the renter of a U-Haul van possibly connected to the Brooklyn subway shooting, in New York, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. New York Mayor Eric Adams said Wednesday, April 13, that officials were now seeking James as a suspect. © NYPD Handout via AP This image provided by the New York City Police Department shows a Crime Stoppers bulletin displaying photos of Frank R. James, who has been identified by police as the renter of a U-Haul van possibly connected to the Brooklyn subway shooting, in New York, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. New York Mayor Eric Adams said Wednesday, April 13, that officials were now seeking James as a suspect.

LIVE UPDATES: Man initially named 'person of interest' in Brooklyn subway shooting is now a suspect

Police focus on van renter in Brooklyn subway shooting probe

  Police focus on van renter in Brooklyn subway shooting probe NEW YORK (AP) — A gunman wearing a gas mask set off smoke grenades and fired a barrage of bullets inside a rush-hour subway train in Brooklyn, wounding at least 10 people Tuesday, authorities said. Police were trying to track down the renter of a van possibly connected to the violence. Chief of Detectives James Essig said investigators weren't sure whether the man, identified as Frank R. James, 62, had any link to the subway attack. AuthoritiesChief of Detectives James Essig said investigators weren't sure whether the man, identified as Frank R. James, 62, had any link to the subway attack.

One such video focuses on the mass shooting at the Molson Coors Beverage Company in Milwaukee on Feb. 26, 2020. In the incident, a 52-year-old electrician fatally shot five co-workers and killed himself.

In a video uploaded to YouTube the following day, James discusses the shooting, saying it happened "in my town" at the brewery plant and talked over images of the gunman and the plant. James also paused to play news coverage of the shooting and later said he related to some of the gunman's workplace experiences.

Other videos touch on themes of violence, systemic racism and Black superiority. In one video posted the day before the attack, the man said he wanted to harm people. "I can say I wanted to kill people. I wanted to watch people die."

Videos police are reviewing include clips from New York's subway trains. In February, a video mentioned the city's subway safety plan. The man says the plan "is doomed for failure" and refers to himself as a "victim" of the mayor’s mental health program. A January video – called "Dear Mr. Mayor" – is somewhat critical of Adams’ plan to end gun violence.

Police still searching for 'person of interest' in Brooklyn subway shooting: What we know

  Police still searching for 'person of interest' in Brooklyn subway shooting: What we know New York police were searching for a person of interest they identified as Frank James, who they say left a key to a van at a Brooklyn subway station.Officials with the New York City Police Department identified Frank James, 62, but stopped short of saying the man was a suspect in the shooting Tuesday morning.

'Nothing like this happens here': Attack shocks Sunset Park, a hub for working-class immigrants

HOW THE SHOOTING UNFOLDED: Videos, photos show chaos of subway attack

In the attack Tuesday, police say the shooter donned a gas mask before setting off two smoke canisters and opening fire while still on the train. He fired 33 times with a Glock 17 9mm semi-handgun, which was also found in the subway. At least 10 people were shot and 19 others taken to hospitals for injuries ranging from smoke inhalation to shrapnel wounds.

Police found two non-detonated smoke grenades, a hatchet, gasoline and the key to a U-Haul van on the train.

Investigators believe James rented the van in Philadelphia and police found it later Tuesday in Brooklyn, Chief of Detectives James Essig said.

James has a residential address in Philadelphia, said Brian O’Hearn, spokesperson for Philadelphia Police Public Affairs. O’Hearn would not provide the exact location, due to departmental policy.

James' apparent address was leaked to the public, he said, and Philadelphia officers were dealing with angry individuals confronting James' mother and other relatives at the location.

Riders return to New York subways – some nervous, some undeterred, many wanting more security

  Riders return to New York subways – some nervous, some undeterred, many wanting more security Subway riders hoped for increased security Wednesday after a gunman injured dozens in a chaotic rush hour shooting in Brooklyn.Some riders at Sunset Park said they were grateful for a bigger police presence a day after the shooting that injured dozens – and they hoped it would continue.

Keilah Miller, who lived across from James in a Milwaukee duplex, said she was filled with fear to see her neighbor’s photograph being circulated in connection with the New York subway attack.

Miller, a receptionist and early childhood education teacher, told USA TODAY that James lived in an adjacent apartment for about six to eight months. She described him as "angry, loud and alone."

"I always heard a lot of yelling, but I never saw anyone else go into the apartment but him," Miller said Wednesday.

The first time she spoke to him was during the winter when she left her key in the door, she said. "I hear this banging on the door, and he’s there saying, 'Don’t do that!' That was the only time we spoke. It was weird. He was just not approachable."

When she learned of James’ connection to the New York attack, Miller said she immediately "packed a bag and left."

"I’m scared to go back home until someone says the place is clear," Miller said, adding that she has been staying with a friend.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: What we know about Frank James, suspect in the Brooklyn subway shooting

After bullets flew, NYC subway workers kept their cool .
NEW YORK (AP) — When smoke bombs and bullets were unleashed on a subway full of morning commuters as it crawled toward a stop in Brooklyn, the train's driver, David Artis, couldn't hear the shots. His first indication something was wrong was when passengers crowded near the door to his operator's compartment to report chaos, one car back. Artis said after a moment of shock, his thoughts quickly shifted from, “Oh my God!” to concern for his passengers. He leaned on his emergency training.“Then it kicked in. Get them out,” he said Friday after he and fellow transit workers were honored by the mayor for their response to Tuesday's shooting.

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