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World: Zelenskyy urges Russian conscripts to 'sabotage' military operations and offers protections to those who surrender: 'It is better to surrender to Ukrainian captivity than to be killed by the strikes of our weapons'

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Ukrainian President Volodyrmyr Zelenskyy seen on March 10, 2022. Office of the President of Ukraine © Office of the President of Ukraine Ukrainian President Volodyrmyr Zelenskyy seen on March 10, 2022. Office of the President of Ukraine
  • Russian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is seeking aid from Russian conscripts.
  • He's urged them to "sabotage" Russian forces and report intel to Ukrainian forces.
  • Zelenskyy also urged Russians to surrender and guaranteed their safety.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is moving to overtake Russia from the inside out.

Russia's seven-month effort to conquer its neighbor, Ukraine, has recently been marked by a partial military mobilization, the country's first since World War II, NBC News reported.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin's mobilization effort impacts 300,000 reservists — many of whom are going to great lengths to avoid being drafted. Some have even headed to the border, despite facing up to 10 years in prison for desertion.

In a video address late on Friday Ukraine time, Zelenskyy said he seeks to "sabotage" Russia's unprovoked efforts to conquer the country.

"If you get into the Russian army, then sabotage any enemy activity, interfere with any Russian operations, give us all important information about the occupiers: their bases, headquarters, ammunition depots," Zelenskyy said, addressing Russsian conscripts.

The mobilization effort comes after Ukrainian forces reclaimed much of Kharkiv, pushing Russian troops to hide amongst locals or retreat.

Russian troops are reportedly demoralized as their numbers wane.  The Pentagon estimates Russian forces have faced anywhere between 70,000 and 80,000 casualties. Many Russians have grown to condemn the war as protests — and more than 1,000 arrests — ensue across the country.

In a Saturday address, Zelenskyy urged Russian forces to surrender, guaranteeing their safety.

"It is better to surrender to Ukrainian captivity than to be killed by the strikes of our weapons, absolutely fair strikes, as Ukraine defends itself in this war. We defend the brightest — we defend our lives, our children, our freedom," he said, according to his website.

"Russian commanders do not care about the lives of Russians — they just need to replenish the empty spaces left by the dead, wounded, those who fled or the Russian soldiers that were captured," the Ukrainian President added.

British and US officials argue that Putin's latest war efforts — including the mobilization effort and threatening the use of nuclear weapons — could mean his invasion is not going as planned.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Russia smuggling Ukrainian grain to help pay for Putin's war .
BEIRUT (AP) — When the bulk cargo ship Laodicea docked in Lebanon last summer, Ukrainian diplomats said the vessel was carrying grain stolen by Russia and urged Lebanese officials to impound the ship. Moscow called the allegation “false and baseless,” and Lebanon’s prosecutor general sided with the Kremlin and declared that the 10,000 tons of barley and wheat flour wasn’t stolen and allowed the ship to unload. But an investigation by TheMoscow called the allegation “false and baseless,” and Lebanon’s prosecutor general sided with the Kremlin and declared that the 10,000 tons of barley and wheat flour wasn’t stolen and allowed the ship to unload.

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